Publications by authors named "G Olivier"

196 Publications

Pathogenic variants in cause autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

J Med Genet 2020 Aug 17. Epub 2020 Aug 17.

Institute for Neurosciences of Montpellier, University of Montpellier, Montpellier, France

Background: Inherited retinal disorders are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of conditions and a major cause of visual impairment. Common disease subtypes include vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Despite the identification of over 90 genes associated with RP, conventional genetic testing fails to detect a molecular diagnosis in about one third of patients with RP.

Methods: Exome sequencing was carried out for identifying the disease-causing gene in a family with autosomal dominant RP. Gene panel testing and exome sequencing were performed in 596 RP and VMD families to identified additional variants. In vivo analysis in the medaka fish system by knockdown assays was performed to screen possible pathogenic role.

Results: Exome sequencing of a family with RP revealed a splice variant in . Subsequently, the same variant was identified in individuals from two families with either RP or VMD. A retrospective study of patients with RP or VMD revealed eight additional families with different missense or nonsense variants in . In addition, the clinical diagnosis of the retinopathy-associated variant, originally described as benign concentric annular macular dystrophy, was also revised to RP with early macular involvement. Using morpholino-mediated ablation of and its paralog in medaka fish, we confirmed a phenotype consistent with that observed in the families, including a decreased length of rod and cone photoreceptor outer segments.

Conclusion: This study discusses a previously unreported association between monoallelic or biallelic variants and RP. Notably, similar observations have been reported for .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jmedgenet-2020-107150DOI Listing
August 2020

Long-term results of laparoscopic cytoreductive surgery and HIPEC for the curative treatment of low-grade pseudomyxoma peritonei and multicystic mesothelioma.

Surg Endosc 2020 Nov 2;34(11):4916-4923. Epub 2019 Dec 2.

Department of Surgical Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Pierre-Bénite, Lyon, France.

Background: Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) provide long-term survival for low-grade pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) and multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma (MM). Feasibility of laparoscopic CRS-HIPEC has been reported for selected patients but data regarding long-term outcomes are missing to assess the oncological interest. This study aimed to report long-term outcomes for low-grade PMP and MM treated by laparoscopic approach.

Methods: From a prospectively maintained CRS-HIPEC database, all patients who underwent laparoscopic CRS-HIPEC with curative intent were analyzed. Selection criteria for laparoscopic approach were low-grade PMP or MM, with pathological confirmation prior to CRS-HIPEC, ASA 2, age < 75 years, no extrap-eritoneal disease, Peritoneal Cancer Index (PCI) < 10, and a limited history of abdominal surgery.

Results: Between March 2009 and June 2017, 43 patients were scheduled for laparoscopic CRS and HIPEC. Laparoscopic CRS and HIPEC was completed (LSC) in 32 patients and 11 patients were converted to open surgery (CONV). Median age was 44.5 years (17.13-71.4) in the LSC group and 54.9 years (22.5-70.5) in the CONV group (p = 0.086). Median BMI was not different between groups, 21.2 and 23.9 for LSC and CONV groups, respectively (p = 0.267). There were 21 and 11 patients in the LSC group, and 8 and 3 in the CONV group, with PMP and MM, respectively (p = 0.794). Median PCI was 2.5 (0-9) and 7 (1-15) in the LSC and CONV groups, respectively (p = 0.004). There was no difference in the completeness of cytoreduction score (p = 0.256). After a median follow-up of 31.6 months (95% CI 19.3-36.4), 2 patients in the LSC group and 2 patients in the CONV group presented with peritoneal recurrence.

Conclusion: For selected patients with low aggressive peritoneal disease, laparoscopic CRS-HIPEC provides interesting long-term outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00464-019-07280-1DOI Listing
November 2020

Dopamine replacement improves motor learning of an upper extremity task in people with Parkinson disease.

Behav Brain Res 2020 01 14;377:112213. Epub 2019 Sep 14.

Department of Physical Therapy and Athletic Training, University of Utah, 520 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, UT, 84108, USA; Department of Biological and Health Systems Engineering, Arizona State University, 501 E Tyler Mall, MC 9709, Tempe, AZ, 85287, USA.

Background: Dopamine replacement medication has positive effects on existing motor skills for people with Parkinson disease (PD), but may have detrimental effects on the learning of motor skills necessary for effective rehabilitation according to the dopamine overdose hypothesis.

Objectives: This study aimed to determine whether dopamine replacement medication (i.e. levodopa) affects: learning of a novel upper extremity task, decrements in skill following withdrawal of practice, the rate of learning, and the transfer of movement skill to untrained upper extremity tasks compared to training "off" medication, in people with PD.

Methods: Participants with mild-moderate PD (Hoehn and Yahr stage 2) were randomized to train "on" (n = 12) or "off" (n = 11) levodopa medication. Participants practiced 10 blocks of five trials of a functional motor task with their non-dominant upper extremity over three consecutive days (acquisition period), followed by a single block of five trials two and nine days later. Participants were also assessed "on" levodopa with two transfer tasks (the nine-hole peg test and a functional dexterity task) prior to any practice and nine days after the end of the acquisition period.

Results: Participants who practiced "on" levodopa medication learned the upper extremity task to a greater extent that those who practiced "off" medication, as determined by retained performance two days after practice. Skill decrement and skill transfer were not significantly different between groups. Rate of learning was unable to be modelled in this sample.

Conclusions: Levodopa medication improved the learning of an upper extremity task in people with mild-moderate PD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2019.112213DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7398159PMC
January 2020

Adaptation of CytoProcessor for cervical cancer screening of challenging slides.

Diagn Cytopathol 2019 Sep 20;47(9):890-897. Epub 2019 May 20.

Research Division, DATEXIM, Caen, France.

Background: Current automated cervical cytology screening systems require purchase of a dedicated preparation machine and use of a specific staining protocol. CytoProcessor (DATEXIM, Caen, France) is a new automated system, designed to integrate seamlessly into the laboratory's existing workflow. We previously demonstrated the superior performance of CytoProcessor for diagnosis of ThinPrep slides compared to the ThinPrep Imaging System (HOLOGIC, Marlborough, MA). Next, we analyzed whether CytoProcessor technology can be adapted for use on Novaprep slides.

Methods: Using artificial intelligence, we developed a new algorithm in CytoProcessor for the analysis of slides prepared using the NOVAPREP Processor System NPS50 (Novacyt, Vélizy-Villacoublay, France). A representative population of 309 cases was selected from the routine workflow in a public hospital. We compared the diagnoses made using CytoProcessor or conventional screening with a microscope. All discordances were resolved by a consensus committee.

Results: The performance of CytoProcessor in terms of diagnostic accuracy on Novaprep slides was very similar to that observed previously on ThinPrep slides. Compared to conventional screening, CytoProcessor slightly improves diagnostic sensitivity while maintaining a statistically equivalent specificity. Diagnosis was reached 1.6 times faster with CytoProcessor compared to using a microscope.

Conclusion: CytoProcessor is a robust automated cervical cytology screening system that can be used successfully with samples having very different characteristics. As previously shown, CytoProcessor confers significant gains in processing time and diagnostic precision. CytoProcessor is accessible through a secured internet connection, making remote diagnosis of Papanicolaou tests possible.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/dc.24213DOI Listing
September 2019

Comparing Comprehension of a Long Text Read in Print Book and on Kindle: Where in the Text and When in the Story?

Front Psychol 2019 15;10:38. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Laboratoire de Neurosciences Cognitives (UMR 7192), CNRS and Aix-Marseille Université, Marseille, France.

Digital reading devices such as Kindle differ from paper books with respect to the kinesthetic and tactile feedback provided to the reader, but the role of these features in reading is rarely studied empirically. This experiment compares reading of a long text on Kindle DX and in print. Fifty participants (24 years old) read a 28 page (∼1 h reading time) long mystery story on Kindle or in a print pocket book and completed several tests measuring various levels of reading comprehension: engagement, recall, capacities to locate events in the text and reconstructing the plot of the story. Results showed that on most tests subjects performed identically whatever the reading medium. However, on measures related to chronology and temporality, those who had read in the print pocket book, performed better than those who had read on a Kindle. It is concluded that, basically comprehension was similar with both media, but, because kinesthetic feedback is less informative with a Kindle, readers were not as efficient to locate events in the space of the text and hence in the temporality of the story. We suggest that, to get a correct spatial representation of the text and consequently a coherent temporal organization of the story, readers would be reliant on the sensorimotor cues which are afforded by the manipulation of the book.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00038DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6384527PMC
February 2019

Predicting Motor Sequence Learning in People With Parkinson Disease.

J Neurol Phys Ther 2019 01;43(1):33-41

Physical Therapy and Athletic Training (G.N.O., S.S.P., K.R.L., C.S.W., S.Y.S., L.E.D.), Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation (K.R.L., L.E.D.), University of Utah, Salt Lake City; Faculty of Health Sciences, the University of Sydney, Australia (S.S.P.); Physical Therapy, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Fayetteville (C.S.W.); and Biological and Health Systems Engineering, Arizona State University, Phoenix (S.Y.S.).

Background And Purpose: Skill acquisition (ie, performance changes during practice) occurs in a nonlinear fashion. Despite this, motor learning is typically measured by comparing discrete timepoints. Thus, typical measures of motor learning do not detect skill acquisition characteristics that may be clinically meaningful. Reliable prediction of motor skill learning in people with Parkinson disease (PD) would allow therapists to more effectively individualize practice doses to fit specific patients' needs. The purposes of this study were to (a) characterize postural skill acquisition in people with PD, and identify factors (such as acquisition rate and practice dose to plateau) that predict learning, and (b) investigate whether levodopa medication (L-dopa) status during practice impacted learning.

Methods: Twenty-seven adults with PD practiced a postural motor task over 3 days, followed by 2 retention tests. Participants were randomized to practice either ON or OFF L-dopa. Data for repeating and random sequences were each analyzed using nonlinear curve-fitting and mixed-effects regressions. Learning was defined as pretest minus retention test performance.

Results: Participants with less physical impairment demonstrated less learning on the repeating and random sequence tasks compared with participants with more impairment. Participants who improved faster during practice demonstrated less learning on the repeating sequence task compared with participants who improved more slowly. Reaching plateau during practice was not related to learning. L-dopa did not impair learning.

Discussion And Conclusions: Participants' skill acquisition characteristics were related to learning a postural motor task. Patient-specific factors, such as the rate of skill acquisition, level of physical function, and medication status, may influence how postural motor practice is delivered during balance rehabilitation.Video Abstract available for more insights from the authors (see the Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, available at: http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A250).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NPT.0000000000000251DOI Listing
January 2019

Dopamine Replacement Medication Does Not Influence Implicit Learning of a Stepping Task in People With Parkinson's Disease.

Neurorehabil Neural Repair 2018 12 9;32(12):1031-1042. Epub 2018 Nov 9.

2 University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.

Introduction: Treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) with exogenous dopamine (ie, levodopa) may positively affect motor symptoms, but may negatively affect other functions such as the learning of motor skills necessary for rehabilitation. This study aimed to determine whether levodopa medication affects general and sequence-specific learning of a stepping task and the transfer of movement skill to untrained balance tasks in people with PD.

Methods: Participants with PD were randomized to practice "on" (n = 14) or "off" (n = 13) levodopa medication. Participants practiced 6 blocks of 6 trials of 24 steps of a stepping task over an acquisition period of 3 consecutive days, followed by single retention blocks of 6 trials 2 and 9 days later. Participants were also assessed on untrained balance (ie, transfer) tasks "on" levodopa before practice and following late retention.

Results: There were no between-group differences in general learning, sequence-specific learning, or transfer of skill to untrained balance tasks ( P > .05). Both groups demonstrated general and sequence-specific learning ( P < .001) and trends for improvement in untrained tasks ( P < .001 to P = .26) following practice. Detailed analysis of early acquisition revealed no difference between medication groups.

Conclusion: People with PD improved performance on the stepping task with practice. The between-group effect sizes were small, suggesting that levodopa medication status ("on" versus "off") during practice did not significantly affect general or sequence-specific learning of the task or components of early acquisition. The practice dose required to optimally result in functional improvements in untrained balance tasks, including reductions in falls, remains to be determined.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1545968318809922DOI Listing
December 2018

An African loss-of-function CACNA1C variant p.T1787M associated with a risk of ventricular fibrillation.

Sci Rep 2018 10 2;8(1):14619. Epub 2018 Oct 2.

University of Bern, Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Bern, Switzerland.

Calcium regulation plays a central role in cardiac function. Several variants in the calcium channel Ca1.2 have been implicated in arrhythmic syndromes. We screened patients with Brugada syndrome, short QT syndrome, early repolarisation syndrome, and idiopathic ventricular fibrillation to determine the frequency and pathogenicity of Ca1.2 variants. Ca1.2 related genes, CACNA1C, CACNB2 and CACNA2D1, were screened in 65 probands. Missense variants were introduced in the Ca1.2 alpha subunit plasmid by mutagenesis to assess their pathogenicity using patch clamp approaches. Six missense variants were identified in CACNA1C in five individuals. Five of them, A1648T, A1689T, G1795R, R1973Q, C1992F, showed no major alterations of the channel function. The sixth C-terminal variant, Caα-T1787M, present mostly in the African population, was identified in two patients with resuscitated cardiac arrest. The first patient originated from Cameroon and the second was an inhabitant of La Reunion Island with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation originating from Purkinje tissues. Patch-clamp analysis revealed that Caα-T1787M reduces the calcium and barium currents by increasing the auto-inhibition mediated by the C-terminal part and increases the voltage-dependent inhibition. We identified a loss-of-function variant, Caα-T1787M, present in 0.8% of the African population, as a new risk factor for ventricular arrhythmia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-32867-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6168548PMC
October 2018

Sewage sludge as a soil amendment in a Larix decidua plantation: Effects on tree growth and floristic diversity.

Sci Total Environ 2018 Apr 27;621:291-301. Epub 2017 Nov 27.

Laboratoire Chrono-Environnement, UMR CNRS 6249, University of Franche-Comté, F-25030 Besançon, France. Electronic address:

Sewage sludge application in forest plantations is an interesting complementary alternative practice to sewage sludge reutilization and recycling, with a significant and sustainable net effect in climate change mitigation. However, to optimize it a detailed knowledge of its effects on ecosystem components such as plants, soil, water and fauna is needed. We investigated the effects of sewage sludge application on soil, tree growth and floristic diversity in a ten-year-old plantation of European larch (Larix decidua Mill.). Our one-hectare study site, located at Mélisey, Haute-Saône, France (47°753' Lat., 6°580' Long.), was subdivided into six plots. Three plots, alternating with three control plots (no sewage sludge application), were amended in June 2008 with 0.4tDWha obtained from a municipal urban wastewater treatment plant in Mélisey. Within each plot, one subplot was delimited and sludge was again manually applied at 3t of DWha in July 2009 and March 2010 to the soil surface of the amended subplots without incorporation. The results showed no effect on radial and height growth of European larch amended with 0.4tDWha. While a significant temporary increase in pH, macro-element contents (N, P and Ca) and the trace metal (Cu and Zn) concentration in the soil was observed, it had no significant effect on needles and sporocarp contents. The number of species in the amended subplots with 3tDWhayear increased by 80% compared to the control. However, the relative species abundance present only in amended subplots remains <1, except for Hypericum humifusum.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.11.283DOI Listing
April 2018

A comparative study of electro-dewatering process performance for activated and digested wastewater sludge.

Water Res 2018 02 11;129:66-82. Epub 2017 Nov 11.

Laboratoire de Thermique Energétique et Procédés (EAD 1932), UPPA, ENSGTI, BP 7511, 64075 Pau Cedex, France.

Electro-dewatering (EDW) is an alternative emerging and energy-efficient technology that provides improved liquid/solids separations in the dewatering of wastewater sludge. The EDW technology is not only an innovative dewatering method for significantly reducing the volume of wastewater sludge before re-utilization or disposal, but is also a promising emerging method which may potentially be used for decontamination purposes. In this study, the influence of the sludge properties (e.g. electrical conductivity, zeta potential, specific cake resistance, among others) on their mechanical and electrical behaviour in terms of dewaterability and electro-dewaterability, the applied current (current density from 20 to 80 A/m), and filter cloth position relative to the electrode was investigated. A two-sided filter press at lab-scale with moving anode was used, and the treatment performance of the EDW process on two different types of wastewater sludge (activated and digested) was thoroughly assessed from both an electrochemical viewpoint and in terms of the dewatering rate. The results showed that the conditioned digested sludge was more easily dewatered by mechanical dewatering (MDW) with 34-35% (w%) of dry solids content compared to 19-20% (w%) for the activated sludge, thanks to the lower content of both the microbial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and the volatile suspended solids fraction. For the EDW results, the electrical conductivity of the sludge was pivotal to the dryness of the final solids and therefore also to the dewatering kinetics. The results demonstrated that the activated sludge arrived at an equilibrium much faster (after approximately 3600 s) compared with digested sludge, thanks to its lower electrical conductivity (0.8 mS/cm) providing a greater voltage drop across the cathode and therefore more repulsion of the solids from the cathode leading to continuously high filtrate flowrate. Also the EDW performance was analysed by comparing the ratio of the filtrate volume collected at the anode to the volume collected at the cathode side. For digested sludge at 5 bar, 40 A/m different positions of the filter cloth were tested but these configurations barely impacted the EDW performance, despite having a significant impact on the energy requirements. At industrial scale, it would be useful to position the filter cloths at some distance from the electrodes, but this study shows that this benefit may be quickly outweighed by the loss in EDW energy efficiency.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2017.10.063DOI Listing
February 2018

Susceptibility of MED-Q1 and MED-Q3 Biotypes of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) Populations to Essential and Seed Oils.

J Econ Entomol 2017 06;110(3):1031-1038

Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard, CNRS, Laboratoire de Biométrie et Biologie Evolutive, UMR 5558, F-69622 Villeurbanne, France

Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is a major pest of many agricultural and ornamental crops in tropical and subtropical regions causing damages that result in important economic losses. Insecticides are commonly used in greenhouses or fields to control B. tabaci populations leading to rapid evolution of resistance that render treatments inefficient. Therefore, and for environmental and human health concerns, other approaches must be developed for this pest management. In the present study, we compare, using the leaf dip method, the toxicity of three essential oils (Cymbopogon citratus, Ocimum americanum, and Hyptis spicigera) and three seed oils (Lannea microcarpa, Lannea acida, and Carapa procera) with three chemical insecticides (acetamiprid, deltamethrin, and chlorpyrifos-ethyl) on adults. Two B. tabaci biotypes (MED-Q1 and MED-Q3) belonging to the Mediterranean species and collected in Burkina Faso were used. Essential oils were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-flame ionization detector. We showed that these two biotypes have different levels of resistance to the three insecticides, MED-Q3 being more sensitive than MED-Q1. Moreover, they differ in the frequency of resistance alleles to insecticides, especially for organophosphates, as these alleles are almost fixed in MED-Q1. On the other hand, the two biotypes prove to be more susceptible to the plant extracts than to insecticides except for chlorpyrifos-ethyl, with essential oils that showed the highest insecticidal activities. Monoterpenes content were the most abundant and showed the highest insecticidal activities. Our results indicated that essential oils, but also seed oils, have the potential to constitute an alternative strategy of pest management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jee/tox100DOI Listing
June 2017

Stimulus-Response Compatibility Effect in the Near-Far Dimension: A Developmental Study.

Front Psychol 2016 5;7:1169. Epub 2016 Aug 5.

CNRS, UMR 9193 - SCALab - Sciences Cognitives et Sciences Affectives, Université de Lille Lille, France.

The present study investigates the developmental aspect of stimulus-response compatibility (SRC) effect in 8-11-years-old children. The task consisted in manually responding to the color of a pawn presented on a chessboard at different distances. Manual responses were provided by reaching a proximal or distal location depending on the color of the stimulus. We found that reaction time was affected by the conflict generated by the response suggested by the location of the stimulus and the response required according to its color. This was not the case for movement time despite we found a higher rate of long duration movements in the incongruent than in the congruent spatial condition. The SRC effect was, however, observed in children older than 10 years old. These findings provide additional evidence for a reorganization of the perceptual system during the period of 8-10 years, integrating progressively multimodal information and preparing more efficiently the body to act in the environment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01169DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4974270PMC
August 2016

PESI - a taxonomic backbone for Europe.

Authors:
Yde de Jong Juliana Kouwenberg Louis Boumans Charles Hussey Roger Hyam Nicola Nicolson Paul Kirk Alan Paton Ellinor Michel Michael D Guiry Phillip S Boegh Henrik Ærenlund Pedersen Henrik Enghoff Eckhard von Raab-Straube Anton Güntsch Marc Geoffroy Andreas Müller Andreas Kohlbecker Walter Berendsohn Ward Appeltans Christos Arvanitidis Bart Vanhoorne Joram Declerck Leen Vandepitte Francisco Hernandez Róisín Nash Mark John Costello David Ouvrard Pascale Bezard-Falgas Thierry Bourgoin Florian Tobias Wetzel Falko Glöckler Günther Korb Caroline Ring Gregor Hagedorn Christoph Häuser Nihat Aktaç Ahmet Asan Adorian Ardelean Paulo Alexandre Vieira Borges Dhimiter Dhora Hasmik Khachatryan Michael Malicky Shaig Ibrahimov Alexander Tuzikov Aaike De Wever Snejana Moncheva Nikolai Spassov Karel Chobot Alexi Popov Igor Boršić Spyros Sfenthourakis Urmas Kõljalg Pertti Uotila Gargominy Olivier Jean-Claude Dauvin David Tarkhnishvili Giorgi Chaladze Michael Tuerkay Anastasios Legakis László Peregovits Gudmundur Gudmundsson Erling Ólafsson Liam Lysaght Bella Sarah Galil Francesco M Raimondo Gianniantonio Domina Fabio Stoch Alessandro Minelli Voldermars Spungis Eduardas Budrys Sergej Olenin Armand Turpel Tania Walisch Vladimir Krpach Marie Therese Gambin Laurentia Ungureanu Gordan Karaman Roy M J C Kleukers Elisabeth Stur Kaare Aagaard Nils Valland Toril Loennechen Moen Wieslaw Bogdanowicz Piotr Tykarski Jan Marcin Węsławski Monika Kędra Antonio M de Frias Martins António Domingos Abreu Ricardo Silva Sergei Medvedev Alexander Ryss Smiljka Šimić Karol Marhold Eduard Stloukal Davorin Tome Marian A Ramos Benito Valdés Francisco Pina Sven Kullander Anders Telenius Yves Gonseth Pascal Tschudin Oleksandra Sergeyeva Volodymyr Vladymyrov Volodymyr Bohdanovych Rizun Chris Raper Dan Lear Pavel Stoev Lyubomir Penev Ana Casino Rubio Thierry Backeljau Hannu Saarenmaa Sandrine Ulenberg

Biodivers Data J 2015 28(3):e5848. Epub 2015 Sep 28.

Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Leiden, Netherlands.

Background: Reliable taxonomy underpins communication in all of biology, not least nature conservation and sustainable use of ecosystem resources. The flexibility of taxonomic interpretations, however, presents a serious challenge for end-users of taxonomic concepts. Users need standardised and continuously harmonised taxonomic reference systems, as well as high-quality and complete taxonomic data sets, but these are generally lacking for non-specialists. The solution is in dynamic, expertly curated web-based taxonomic tools. The Pan-European Species-directories Infrastructure (PESI) worked to solve this key issue by providing a taxonomic e-infrastructure for Europe. It strengthened the relevant social (expertise) and information (standards, data and technical) capacities of five major community networks on taxonomic indexing in Europe, which is essential for proper biodiversity assessment and monitoring activities. The key objectives of PESI were: 1) standardisation in taxonomic reference systems, 2) enhancement of the quality and completeness of taxonomic data sets and 3) creation of integrated access to taxonomic information.

New Information: This paper describes the results of PESI and its future prospects, including the involvement in major European biodiversity informatics initiatives and programs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/BDJ.3.e5848DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4609752PMC
October 2015

Emergence of Lineage IV Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus in Ethiopia: Complete Genome Sequence of an Ethiopian Isolate 2010.

Transbound Emerg Dis 2016 Aug 14;63(4):435-42. Epub 2014 Nov 14.

The Pirbright Institute, Pirbright, Woking, Surrey, UK.

Isolates of peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) can be segregated genetically into four lineages. For decades, lineages I-III have been reported across Africa whilst lineage IV has predominantly circulated across Asia. However, the lineage distribution is currently changing in Africa. Importantly, full genome sequence data for African field isolates have been lacking. Here, we announce the first complete genome sequence of a field isolate of peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) from East Africa. This isolate was derived from the intestine of a goat suffering from severe clinical disease during the 2010 outbreak in Ethiopia. The full genome sequence of this isolate, PPRV Ethiopia/2010, clusters genetically with other lineage IV isolates of PPRV, sharing high levels of sequence identity across the genome. Further, we have carried out a phylogenetic analysis of all of the available African partial N gene and F gene PPRV sequences to investigate the epidemiology of PPRV with a focus on the emergence of different lineages of PPRV in Africa.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tbed.12287DOI Listing
August 2016

Structure-determining step in the hierarchical assembly of peptoid nanosheets.

ACS Nano 2014 Nov 24;8(11):11674-84. Epub 2014 Oct 24.

The Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory , 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720, United States.

Organic two-dimensional nanomaterials are of growing importance, yet few general synthetic methods exist to produce them in high yields and to precisely functionalize them. We previously developed an efficient hierarchical supramolecular assembly route to peptoid bilayer nanosheets, where the organization of biomimetic polymer sequences is catalyzed by an air-water interface. Here we determine at which stages of assembly the nanoscale and atomic-scale order appear. We used X-ray scattering, grazing incidence X-ray scattering at the air-water interface, electron diffraction, and a recently developed computational coarse-grained peptoid model to probe the molecular ordering at various stages of assembly. We found that lateral packing and organization of the chains occurs during the formation of a peptoid monolayer, prior to its collapse into a bilayer. Identifying the structure-determining step enables strategies to influence nanosheet order, to predict and optimize production yields, and to further engineer this class of material. More generally, our results provide a guide for using fluid interfaces to catalytically assemble 2D nanomaterials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nn505007uDOI Listing
November 2014

A phase 1 dose escalation study of idarubicin combined with methotrexate, vindesine, and prednisolone for untreated elderly patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma. The GOELAMS LCP 99 trial.

Am J Hematol 2014 Nov 27;89(11):1024-9. Epub 2014 Aug 27.

Department of Oncology-Hematology and Cell Therapy, University Hospital, Poitiers, France.

Treatment of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) in elderly patients remains unsatisfactory. To develop a new high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX)-based regimen including idarubicin, a phase 1 multicenter dose escalation study was conducted to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of idarubicin. Thirty-five immunocompetent patients with PCNSL were enrolled. The median age was 65 years (range, 60-70 years). MTX and vindesine (VDS) were given at the fixed dose of 3 g/m(2) (6-hr intravenous [IV]) and 3 mg/m(2) IV on day 1, respectively. Prednisolone (PRED) was given at the fixed dose of 60 mg/m(2) (IV or orally) on days 1-5. Idarubicin was escalated in increments of 2 mg/m(2) with doses ranging from 12-18 mg/m(2) IV on day 1. Treatment was repeated three times every 3 weeks. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as grade 4 neutropenia for more than 7 days, thrombocytopenia grade 4 or nonhaematological toxicity more than grade 2. The MTD of idarubicin was reached at 16 mg/m(2) . At this level, the main haematological toxicities were thrombocytopenia grade 4: 5% and neutropenia grade 3 or 4 (52%); the main nonhaematological toxicities were grade 3 or 4 infectious disease (5%) and grade 2 renal failure (9%). For the study population, median overall and progression-free survival were 19 and 13 months, respectively. Our study suggests that the MTD of idarubicin in combination with HD-MTX, VDS, and PRED, should be 16 mg/m(2) . Further studies will be necessary to challenge a standard treatment in elderly patients with PCNSL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajh.23812DOI Listing
November 2014

Preparation of forefinger's sequence on keyboard orients ocular fixations on computer screen.

Cogn Process 2014 Aug 30;15(3):415-22. Epub 2014 Mar 30.

LAPCOS, Université Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Nice, France,

This study examined the links between attention, hand movements and eye movements when performed in different spatial areas. Participants performed a visual search task on a computer screen while preparing to press two keyboard keys sequentially with their index. Results showed that the planning of the manual sequence influenced the latency of the first saccade and the placement of the first fixation. In particular, even if the first fixation placement was influenced by the combination of both components of the prepared manual sequence in some trials, it was affected principally by the first component of the prepared manual sequence. Moreover, the probability that the first fixation placement did reflect a combination of both components of the manual sequence was correlated with the speed of the second component. This finding suggests that the preparation of the second component of the sequence influence simultaneous oculomotor behavior when motor control of the manual sequence relied on proactive motor planning. These results are discussed taking into account the current debate on the eye/hand coordination research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10339-014-0612-6DOI Listing
August 2014

Antibody-mimetic peptoid nanosheets for molecular recognition.

ACS Nano 2013 Oct 18;7(10):9276-86. Epub 2013 Sep 18.

The Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory , 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720, United States.

The ability of antibodies to bind a wide variety of analytes with high specificity and high affinity make them ideal candidates as molecular recognition elements for chemical and biological sensors. However, their widespread use in sensing devices has been hampered by their poor stability and high production cost. Here we report the design and synthesis of a new class of antibody-mimetic materials based on functionalized peptoid nanosheets. A high density of conformationally constrained peptide and peptoid loops are displayed on the surface of free-floating nanosheets to generate an extended, multivalent two-dimensional material that is chemically and biologically stable. The nanosheet serves as a robust, high-surface area scaffold upon which to display a wide variety of functional loop sequences. The functionalized nanosheets were characterized by atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray reflectivity measurements, and were shown to serve as substrates for enzymes (protease and casein kinase II), as well as templates for the growth of defined inorganic materials (gold metal).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nn403899yDOI Listing
October 2013

Motor transfer from map ocular exploration to locomotion during spatial navigation from memory.

Exp Brain Res 2013 Feb 7;224(4):605-11. Epub 2012 Dec 7.

Université de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, LIRCES, EA 3159, 98 bd Edouard Herriot, BP 3209, 06204, Nice Cedex 3, France.

Spatial navigation from memory can rely on two different strategies: a mental simulation of a kinesthetic spatial navigation (egocentric route strategy) or visual-spatial memory using a mental map (allocentric survey strategy). We hypothesized that a previously performed "oculomotor navigation" on a map could be used by the brain to perform a locomotor memory task. Participants were instructed to (1) learn a path on a map through a sequence of vertical and horizontal eyes movements and (2) walk on the slabs of a "magic carpet" to recall this path. The main results showed that the anisotropy of ocular movements (horizontal ones being more efficient than vertical ones) influenced performances of participants when they change direction on the central slab of the magic carpet. These data suggest that, to find their way through locomotor space, subjects mentally repeated their past ocular exploration of the map, and this visuo-motor memory was used as a template for the locomotor performance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-012-3336-9DOI Listing
February 2013

Osteoconductive phosphoserine-modified poly({varepsilon}-lysine) dendrons: synthesis, titanium oxide surface functionalization and response of osteoblast-like cell lines.

J R Soc Interface 2013 Feb;10(79):20120765

Brighton Studies in Tissue-mimicry and Aided Regeneration, School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Brighton, , Huxley Building, Lewes Road, Brighton, UK.

The lack of direct bonding between the surface of an implant and the mineralized bony tissue is among the main causes of aseptic loosening in titanium-based implants. Surface etching and ceramic coatings have led to improved osteointegration, but their clinical performance is still limited either by partial bonding or by coating delamination. In this work, a solid-phase synthesis method has been optimized to produce poly(ε-lysine) dendrons, the outermost branching generation of which is functionalized by phosphoserine (PS), a known catalyst of the biomineralization process. The dendrons were deposited onto etched titanium oxide surfaces as a near-to-monolayer film able to induce the formation of a homogeneous calcium phosphate phase in a simulated body fluid over 3 days. The dendron films also stimulated MG63 and SAOS-2 osteoblast-like cells to proliferate at a rate significantly higher than etched titanium, with SAOS-2 also showing a higher degree of differentiation over 14 days. PS-tethered dendron films were not affected by various sterilization methods and UV treatment appeared to improve the cell substrate potential of these films, thus suggesting their potential as a surface functionalization method for bone implants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsif.2012.0765DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3565693PMC
February 2013

Residual malignant and normal plasma cells shortly after high dose melphalan and stem cell transplantation. Highlight of a putative therapeutic window in Multiple Myeloma?

Oncotarget 2012 Nov;3(11):1335-47

INSERM, U1040, Montpellier, France.

Multiple Myeloma (MM) is an incurable malignant plasma cell disorder. We have evaluated the counts of Multiple Myeloma Cells (MMCs) and normal plasma cells (N-PCs), seven days after high-dose melphalan (HDM) and autologous stem transplantation (ASCT). Two third of patients had detectable minimal residual disease (MRD+) (71.7 MMCs/µL) after induction treatment with dexamethasone and proteasome inhibitor. MMC counts were reduced by 92% (P ≤ .05) but not eradicated 7 days after HDM+ASCT. Post-HDM+ASCT MMCs were viable and bathed in a burst of MMC growth factors, linked with post-HDM aplasia. In one third of patients (MRD- patients), MMCs were not detectable after induction treatment and remained undetectable after HDM+ASCT. Major difference between MRD- and MRD+ patients is that N-PC counts were increased 3 fold (P〈.05) by HDM+ASCT in MRD- patients, but were unaffected in MRD+ patients. Possible explanation could be that clearance of MMCs in MRD- patients makes more niches available for N-PCs. Thus, MMCs are not fully eradicated shortly after HDM, are bathed in high concentrations of MMC growth factors in an almost desert BM, are viable in short-term culture, which suggests providing additional therapies shortly after HDM to kill resistant MMCs before full repair of lesions.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4539173PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.650DOI Listing
November 2012

Development and use of standardised data collection tools to support and inform musculoskeletal practice.

Man Ther 2012 Dec 7;17(6):489-96. Epub 2012 Sep 7.

Clinical Research Centre for Health Professions, University of Brighton, Aldro Building, 49 Darley Road, Eastbourne, East Sussex BN20 7UR, UK.

Clinicians all over the world are increasingly being faced with the need to demonstrate and account for the way in which clinical services are delivered and the quality of the delivery. It is also imperative to develop a comprehensive profile of who is accessing these services, who benefits from these services; how much these services cost in terms of clinicians time, the use of other healthcare resources and the effectiveness of interventions utilised in relation to quality outcomes. Clinicians are themselves keen to have mechanisms to identify what approaches are being utilised in their own practice setting, how they work best and how they can be improved from a professional development perspective. They are also anxious to improve their skills based on informed reflective practice and identify gaps in their knowledge and skills. This masterclass identifies how standardised data collection (SDC) tools can be utilised in practice to gather the information required in a robust, agreed and accessible way. It summarises a method of SDC tool development and gives some examples of how SDC has been implemented in physiotherapy National Health Services and in physiotherapy private practice in the United Kingdom. The global relevance is that increasingly all physiotherapy services are being held and will be accountable for the quality and equity of care. In addition clinicians can find it useful to have benchmarks with which to compare their own and their departmental performance in terms of clinical activities and outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.math.2012.07.008DOI Listing
December 2012

Temporal and spatial expression of CCN3 during retina development.

Dev Neurobiol 2012 Nov 13;72(11):1363-75. Epub 2012 Jul 13.

INSERM UMR S938 Centre de Recherche de Saint-Antoine, Hôpital Saint Antoine Paris F 75012, France.

NOV/CCN3 is one of the founding members of the CCN (Cyr61 CTGF NOV) family. In the avian retina, CCN3 expression is mostly located within the central region of the inner nuclear layer. As retinal development progresses and this retinal layer differentiates and matures, CCN3 expression forms a dorsal-ventral and a central-peripheral gradient. CCN3 is produced by two glial cell types, peripapillary cells and Müller cells, as well as by horizontal, amacrine, and bipolar interneurons. In retinal neurons and Müller cell cultures, CCN3 expression is induced by activated BMP signaling, whereas Notch signaling decreases CCN3 mRNA and protein levels in Müller cells and has no effect in retinal neurons. In Müller cells, the CCN3 expression detected may thus result from a balance between the Notch and BMP signaling pathways.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/dneu.20994DOI Listing
November 2012

Shaken, not stirred: collapsing a peptoid monolayer to produce free-floating, stable nanosheets.

J Am Chem Soc 2011 Dec 12;133(51):20808-15. Epub 2011 Oct 12.

The Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.

Two-dimensional nanomaterials play a critical role in biology (e.g., lipid bilayers) and electronics (e.g., graphene) but are difficult to directly synthesize with a high level of precision. Peptoid nanosheet bilayers are a versatile synthetic platform for constructing multifunctional, precisely ordered two-dimensional nanostructures. Here we show that nanosheet formation occurs through an unusual monolayer intermediate at the air-water interface. Lateral compression of a self-assembled peptoid monolayer beyond a critical collapse pressure results in the irreversible production of nanosheets. An unusual thermodynamic cycle is employed on a preparative scale, where mechanical energy is used to buckle an intermediate monolayer into a more stable nanosheet. Detailed physical studies of the monolayer-compression mechanism revealed a simple preparative technique to produce nanosheets in 95% overall yield by cyclical monolayer compressions in a rotating closed vial. Compression of monolayers into stable, free-floating products may be a general and preparative approach to access 2D nanomaterials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ja206199dDOI Listing
December 2011

Assessment of biological activity of novel peptide analogues of angiotensin IV.

J Pharm Pharmacol 2011 Apr 1;63(4):565-71. Epub 2011 Mar 1.

School of Pharmacy & Biomolecular Sciences, University of Brighton Brighton and Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK.

Objectives: Angiotensin IV (Ang IV) is a metabolite of angiotensin II which acts on specific AT(4) receptors identified as the enzyme insulin regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP). The transduction process of these receptors is unresolved, but Ang IV inhibits the aminopeptidase activity. Ang IV improves cognition in animal models thus there is a desire to develop metabolically stable analogues for further development.

Methods: Peptide analogues of Ang IV were obtained commercially or synthesised. Each peptide was tested in vitro for its ability to inhibit the aminopeptidase activity (IRAP) of mouse brain homogenates and for its effects on isolated rat uterine smooth muscle.

Key Findings: [Des-Val(1) ]-Ang IV, acetylated-Ang IV-amide, Ang IV-amide and [des-His(4) ]-Ang IV all inhibited IRAP. [Sar(1) , Ile(8) ]-Angiotensin II (10 µm) had an effect greater than that of Ang IV or any of the other analogues studied. In isolated uterine smooth muscle, angiotensins II and IV induced contractions, which could be antagonised by an AT(1) -receptor antagonist. None of the novel peptides induced uterine smooth muscle contractions, but [Sar(1) , des Arg(2) -Gly(8) ]-angiotensin II showed significant antagonism of the contractile effects of angiotensin II and carboxyamide-terminated Ang IV-NH(2) showed antagonism of Ang IV-induced contractions.

Conclusions: This study provides five novel inhibitors of IRAP worthy of assessment in behavioural models of learning and memory. The analogues are devoid of AT(1) receptor agonist properties, and the carboxyamide analogue presents an opportunity to elucidate the mechanism of action of Ang IV as, like Ang IV, it inhibits IRAP, but antagonises the effects of Ang IV on isolated smooth muscle.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.2042-7158.2010.01247.xDOI Listing
April 2011

Breakthrough Hormographiella aspergillata infections arising in neutropenic patients treated empirically with caspofungin.

J Clin Microbiol 2011 Jan 10;49(1):461-5. Epub 2010 Nov 10.

Université Paris Descartes, Service d'Hématologie Adultes, Hôpital Necker-Enfants Malades, AP-HP, 149 Rue de Sèvres, 75743 Paris Cedex 15, France.

Hormographiella aspergillata, a filamentous basidiomycete, has rarely been involved in human infections. We describe 2 febrile neutropenic patients who developed a severe pulmonary infection due to H. aspergillata while receiving empirical caspofungin therapy for presumed fungal pneumonia. After introduction of liposomal amphotericin B, one patient, who had neutrophil recovery, presented a favorable outcome, while the other, who remained neutropenic throughout the course of infection, died. Resistant fungi, including basidiomycetes, may emerge during empirical treatment with caspofungin in febrile neutropenic patients. A rapid switch to any other potent antifungal should be rapidly considered in case of failure of caspofungin in this setting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.01213-10DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3020423PMC
January 2011

Invariance of the solid-liquid interfacial energy in electrowetting probed via capillary condensation.

Langmuir 2010 Jul;26(14):11946-50

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA.

Capillary condensation is employed to probe the solid-liquid interfacial energy in electrowetting on dielectric. The height of an annular water meniscus formed via capillary condensation inside the surface force apparatus is measured as a function of the potential applied across the meniscus and the dielectric stack where the meniscus is formed. According to the Kelvin equation, a decrease in the solid-liquid interfacial energy at constant temperature and relative humidity should lead to an increase in the meniscus height. Our experimental results on nanometer-sized meniscus are in agreement with the work of Mugele [J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 2007, 19, 375112] and unequivocally demonstrate that the real contact angle (or the solid-liquid interfacial energy) remains unaltered in electrowetting on dielectric.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/la101255tDOI Listing
July 2010

Supramolecular ion-pair interactions to control monolayer assembly.

Langmuir 2009 Feb;25(4):2159-65

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA.

We demonstrate that noncovalent ion-pair interactions in solution can be employed to control the molecular spacing of thiols in a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on gold. Ion-pairs formed between the carboxylate tail-group of 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHA) and tetraalkylammonium (TAA+) hydroxide salts of various alkyl side-chain lengths remain intact during chemisorption of the thiol on gold. The resulting ion-pair SAMs exhibit a 1:1 molar ratio of MHA:TAA+ on the surface and are covalently bound to the gold surface through the thiol headgroup of MHA. We hypothesize that the incorporation of the bulky TAA+ group competes with the strong tendency of the thiols to organize into an ordered monolayer, which highlights the strength of the ion-pair complexes. The ion-pair films can be converted into a loosely packed MHA monolayer by rinsing the SAM with a solution of potassium perchlorate, which releases the TAA+ from the surface. Contact angle measurements and X-ray spectroscopy (XPS) confirm the stoichiometry and covalent attachment of the monolayers. XPS analysis and contact angle measurements indicate that the surface density of bound MHA decreases with increasing size of the TAA+ cation. These results suggest that steric hindrance created by the bulky side-chains of the TAA+ cation dictates the lateral spacing of MHA chains on the surface.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/la803057xDOI Listing
February 2009

Visual objects can potentiate a grasping neural simulation which interferes with manual response execution.

Acta Psychol (Amst) 2009 Feb 4;130(2):147-52. Epub 2009 Jan 4.

Cognitive and Social Psychology Laboratory, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, France.

Previous studies on visuomotor priming have provided insufficient information to determine whether the reach-to-grasp potentiation of a non-target object produces a specific effect during response execution. In order to answer this question, subjects were instructed to reach and grasp a response device with either a power or a precision grip, depending on whether the stimulus they saw was empty or full. Stimuli consisted of containers (graspable with either a power or a precision grip), with non-graspable stimuli added as a control condition (geometrical shapes). The image of the non-target object was removed during the execution phase. Results demonstrate slower execution responses related to motor incompatibility, though conversely, no faster responses with motor compatibility. Moreover, any visuomotor priming effect required that the container be displayed during response execution. These data suggest that during response execution, motor incompatibility produces a disruptive effect likely due to competition between two cerebral events: motor control of the actual response execution and visual object reach-to-grasp neural simulation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actpsy.2008.11.004DOI Listing
February 2009