Publications by authors named "G Meyer"

2,825 Publications

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Sterile Pericarditis in Aachener Minipigs As a Model for Atrial Myopathy and Atrial Fibrillation.

J Vis Exp 2021 Sep 24(175). Epub 2021 Sep 24.

Laboratory of Physiopharmacology, University of Antwerp; Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Antwerp;

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia caused by structural remodeling of the atria, also called atrial myopathy. Current therapies only target the electrical abnormalities and not the underlying atrial myopathy. For the development of novel therapies, a reproducible large animal model of atrial myopathy is necessary. This paper presents a model of sterile pericarditis-induced atrial myopathy in Aachener minipigs. Sterile pericarditis was induced by spraying sterile talcum and leaving a layer of sterile gauze over the atrial epicardial surface. This led to inflammation and fibrosis, two crucial components of the pathophysiology of atrial myopathy, making the atria susceptible to the induction of AF. Two pacemaker electrodes were positioned epicardially on each atrium and connected to two pacemakers from different manufacturers. This strategy allowed for repeated non-invasive atrial programmed stimulation to determine the inducibility of AF at specified time points after surgery. Different protocols to test AF inducibility were used. The advantages of this model are its clinical relevance, with AF inducibility and the rapid induction of inflammation and fibrosis-both present in atrial myopathy-and its reproducibility. The model will be useful in the development of novel therapies targeting atrial myopathy and AF.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3791/63094DOI Listing
September 2021

Rivaroxaban versus Dalteparin in Cancer-Associated Thromboembolism: A Randomized Trial.

Chest 2021 Oct 7. Epub 2021 Oct 7.

F-CRIN INNOVTE network, Saint Etienne, France; Service de Médecine Vasculaire et Thérapeutique, CHU de St-Etienne, Saint-Etienne, France.

Background: Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are an alternative to low-molecular-weight heparin for treating cancer-associated venous thromboembolism (VTE).

Research Question: Is rivaroxaban as efficient and safe as dalteparin to treat patients with cancer-associated VTE?

Study Design And Methods: In a randomized open-label non-inferiority trial, patients with active cancer who had proximal deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) and/or pulmonary embolism (PE) were randomly assigned to therapeutic doses of rivaroxaban or dalteparin for 3 months. The primary outcome was the cumulative incidence of recurrent VTE, a composite of symptomatic or incidental DVT or PE, and worsening of pulmonary vascular or venous obstruction at 3 months.

Results: Of 158 randomized patients, 74 and 84 patients were assigned to receive rivaroxaban and dalteparin, respectively. Mean age was 69.4 years, 115 patients (76.2%) had metastatic disease. The primary outcome occurred in 4 and 6 patients in the rivaroxaban and dalteparin groups, respectively (cumulative incidence 6.4% vs 10.1%, subdistribution hazard ratio [SHR] 0.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21-2.66, in both the intention-to-treat and per-protocol populations). Major bleeding occurred in 1 and 3 patients in the rivaroxaban and dalteparin groups, respectively (cumulative incidence 1.4% vs 3.7%, SHR 0.36, 95%CI 0.04-3.43). Major or clinically relevant non-major bleeding occurred in 9 and 8 patients in the rivaroxaban and dalteparin groups, respectively (cumulative incidence 12.2% vs 9.8%, SHR 1.27, 95%CI 0.49-3.26). Overall, 19 (25.7%) and 20 (23.8%) patients died in the rivaroxaban and dalteparin groups, respectively (HR 1.05, 95% CI, 0.56-1.97).

Interpretation: In this trial comparing rivaroxaban and dalteparin in the treatment of cancer-associated VTE, the number of patients was insufficient to reach the predefined criteria for non-inferiority, but efficacy and safety results were consistent with those previously reported with DOACs. An updated meta-analysis of randomized trials comparing DOACs with low-molecular-weight heparin in patients with cancer-associated VTE is provided.

Trial Registration: NCT02746185.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chest.2021.09.037DOI Listing
October 2021

Dye-sensitized solar cells strike back.

Chem Soc Rev 2021 Sep 30. Epub 2021 Sep 30.

School of Natural and Environmental Science, Newcastle University, Bedson Building, NE1 7RU Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) are celebrating their 30th birthday and they are attracting a wealth of research efforts aimed at unleashing their full potential. In recent years, DSCs and dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical cells (DSPECs) have experienced a renaissance as the best technology for several niche applications that take advantage of DSCs' unique combination of properties: at low cost, they are composed of non-toxic materials, are colorful, transparent, and very efficient in low light conditions. This review summarizes the advancements in the field over the last decade, encompassing all aspects of the DSC technology: theoretical studies, characterization techniques, materials, applications as solar cells and as drivers for the synthesis of solar fuels, and commercialization efforts from various companies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/d0cs01336fDOI Listing
September 2021

Reduced-dose intravenous thrombolysis for acute intermediate high-risk pulmonary embolism: Rationale and design of the PEITHO-3 trial.

Thromb Haemost 2021 Sep 24. Epub 2021 Sep 24.

Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Paris, France.

Intermediate high-risk pulmonary embolism (PE) is characterised by right ventricular (RV) dysfunction and elevated circulating cardiac troponin levels despite apparent haemodynamic stability at presentation. In these patients, full-dose systemic thrombolysis reduced the risk of haemodynamic decompensation or death but increased the risk of life-threatening bleeding. Reduced-dose thrombolysis may be capable of improving safety while maintaining reperfusion efficacy. The Pulmonary Embolism International Trial (PEITHO)-3 study (EudraCT 2018-000816-96) is a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicentre, multinational trial with long-term follow-up. We will compare the efficacy and safety of a reduced-dose alteplase regimen with standard heparin anticoagulation. Patients with intermediate high-risk PE will also fulfil at least one clinical criterion of severity: systolic blood pressure ≤ 110 mmHg, respiratory rate >20 breaths/min, or history of heart failure. The primary efficacy outcome is the composite of all-cause death, haemodynamic decompensation or PE recurrence within 30 days of randomisation. Key secondary outcomes, to be included in hierarchical analysis, are fatal or GUSTO severe or life-threatening bleeding; net clinical benefit (primary efficacy outcome plus severe or life-threatening bleeding); and all-cause death, all within 30 days. All outcomes will be adjudicated by an independent committee. Further outcomes include PE-related death, haemodynamic decompensation, or stroke within 30 days; dyspnoea, functional limitation or RV dysfunction at 6 months and 2 years; and utilisation of healthcare resources within 30 days and 2 years. The study is planned to enrol 650 patients. The results are expected to have a major impact on risk-adjusted treatment of acute PE and inform guideline recommendations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/a-1653-4699DOI Listing
September 2021

Reduced-dose intravenous thrombolysis for acute intermediate high-risk pulmonary embolism: Rationale and design of the PEITHO-3 trial.

Thromb Haemost 2021 Sep 24. Epub 2021 Sep 24.

Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Paris, France.

Intermediate high-risk pulmonary embolism (PE) is characterised by right ventricular (RV) dysfunction and elevated circulating cardiac troponin levels despite apparent haemodynamic stability at presentation. In these patients, full-dose systemic thrombolysis reduced the risk of haemodynamic decompensation or death but increased the risk of life-threatening bleeding. Reduced-dose thrombolysis may be capable of improving safety while maintaining reperfusion efficacy. The Pulmonary Embolism International Trial (PEITHO)-3 study (EudraCT 2018-000816-96) is a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicentre, multinational trial with long-term follow-up. We will compare the efficacy and safety of a reduced-dose alteplase regimen with standard heparin anticoagulation. Patients with intermediate high-risk PE will also fulfil at least one clinical criterion of severity: systolic blood pressure ≤ 110 mmHg, respiratory rate >20 breaths/min, or history of heart failure. The primary efficacy outcome is the composite of all-cause death, haemodynamic decompensation or PE recurrence within 30 days of randomisation. Key secondary outcomes, to be included in hierarchical analysis, are fatal or GUSTO severe or life-threatening bleeding; net clinical benefit (primary efficacy outcome plus severe or life-threatening bleeding); and all-cause death, all within 30 days. All outcomes will be adjudicated by an independent committee. Further outcomes include PE-related death, haemodynamic decompensation, or stroke within 30 days; dyspnoea, functional limitation or RV dysfunction at 6 months and 2 years; and utilisation of healthcare resources within 30 days and 2 years. The study is planned to enrol 650 patients. The results are expected to have a major impact on risk-adjusted treatment of acute PE and inform guideline recommendations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/a-1653-4699DOI Listing
September 2021
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