Publications by authors named "G F Ciska Veen"

88 Publications

Home-field advantage of litter decomposition: from the phyllosphere to the soil.

New Phytol 2021 May 19. Epub 2021 May 19.

Department of Terrestrial Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology, Droevendaalstesteeg 10, Wageningen, 6708 PB, the Netherlands.

Plants often associate with specialized decomposer communities that increase plant litter breakdown, a phenomenon that is known as the 'home-field advantage' (HFA). Although the concept of HFA has long considered only the role of the soil microbial community, explicit consideration of the role of the microbial community on the foliage before litter fall (i.e. the phyllosphere community) may help us to better understand HFA. We investigated the occurrence of HFA in the presence vs absence of phyllosphere communities and found that HFA effects were smaller when phyllosphere communities were removed. We propose that priority effects and interactions between phyllosphere and soil organisms can help explain the positive effects of the phyllosphere at home, and suggest a path forward for further investigation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nph.17475DOI Listing
May 2021

Plant-Soil Feedbacks and Temporal Dynamics of Plant Diversity-Productivity Relationships.

Trends Ecol Evol 2021 Jul 20;36(7):651-661. Epub 2021 Apr 20.

Department of Terrestrial Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO- KNAW), Wageningen, The Netherlands; Institute of Biology, Section Plant Ecology and Phytochemistry, Leiden University, 2300, RA, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Plant-soil feedback (PSF) and diversity-productivity relationships are important research fields to study drivers and consequences of changes in plant biodiversity. While studies suggest that positive plant diversity-productivity relationships can be explained by variation in PSF in diverse plant communities, key questions on their temporal relationships remain. Here, we discuss three processes that change PSF over time in diverse plant communities, and their effects on temporal dynamics of diversity-productivity relationships: spatial redistribution and changes in dominance of plant species; phenotypic shifts in plant traits; and dilution of soil pathogens and increase in soil mutualists. Disentangling these processes in plant diversity experiments will yield new insights into how plant diversity-productivity relationships change over time.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2021.03.011DOI Listing
July 2021

Protists as catalyzers of microbial litter breakdown and carbon cycling at different temperature regimes.

ISME J 2021 02 1;15(2):618-621. Epub 2020 Oct 1.

Department of Terrestrial Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Soil bacteria and fungi are key drivers of carbon released from soils to the atmosphere through decomposition of plant-derived organic carbon sources. This process has important consequences for the global climate. While global change factors, such as increased temperature, are known to affect bacterial- and fungal-mediated decomposition rates, the role of trophic interactions in affecting decomposition remains largely unknown. We designed synthetic microbial communities consisting of eight bacterial and eight fungal species and tested the influence of predation by a model protist, Physarum polycephalum, on litter breakdown at 17 and 21 °C. Protists increased CO release and litter mass loss by ~35% at 17 °C lower temperatures, while they only had minor effects on microbial-driven CO release and mass loss at 21 °C. We found species-specific differences in predator-prey interactions, which may affect microbial community composition and functioning and thus underlie the impact of protists on litter breakdown. Our findings suggest that microbial predation by fast-growing protists is of under-appreciated functional importance, as it affects decomposition and, as such, may influence global carbon dynamics. Our results indicate that we need to better understand the role of trophic interactions within the microbiome in controlling decomposition processes and carbon cycling.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41396-020-00792-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8027204PMC
February 2021

The abundance of arbuscular mycorrhiza in soils is linked to the total length of roots colonized at ecosystem level.

PLoS One 2020 11;15(9):e0237256. Epub 2020 Sep 11.

Environmental Biology Department, Institute of Environmental Sciences, Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands.

Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) strongly affect ecosystem functioning. To understand and quantify the mechanisms of this control, knowledge about the relationship between the actual abundance and community composition of AMF in the soil and in plant roots is needed. We collected soil and root samples in a natural dune grassland to test whether, across a plant community, the abundance of AMF in host roots (measured as the total length of roots colonized) is related to soil AMF abundance (using the neutral lipid fatty acids (NLFA) 16:1ω5 as proxy). Next-generation sequencing was used to explore the role of community composition in abundance patterns. We found a strong positive relationship between the total length of roots colonized by AMF and the amount of NLFA 16:1ω5 in the soil. We provide the first field-based evidence of proportional biomass allocation between intra-and extraradical AMF mycelium, at ecosystem level. We suggest that this phenomenon is made possible by compensatory colonization strategies of individual fungal species. Finally, our findings open the possibility of using AMF total root colonization as a proxy for soil AMF abundances, aiding further exploration of the AMF impacts on ecosystems functioning.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0237256PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7485760PMC
October 2020

Evening aspirin intake results in higher levels of platelet inhibition and a reduction in reticulated platelets - a window of opportunity for patients with cardiovascular disease?

Platelets 2020 Aug 25:1-7. Epub 2020 Aug 25.

Department of Internal Medicine, Amsterdam UMC, Location VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Cardiovascular events occur most frequently in the early morning. Similarly, the release of reticulated platelets (RP) by megakaryocytes has a peak in the late night and early morning. Which aspirin regimen most effectively inhibits platelets during these critical hours is unknown. Hence, the primary objective of this trial was to assess platelet function and RP levels at 8.00 AM, in stable cardiovascular (CVD) patients, during three different aspirin regimens. In this open-label randomized cross-over study subjects were allocated to three sequential aspirin regimens: once-daily (OD) 80 mg morning; OD-evening, and twice-daily (BID) 40 mg. Platelet function was measured at 8.00 AM & 8.00 PM by serum Thromboxane B (sTxB) levels, the Platelet Function Analyzer (PFA)-200® Closure Time (CT), Aspirin Reaction Units (ARU, VerifyNow®), and RP levels. In total, 22 patients were included. At 8.00 AM, sTxB levels were the lowest after OD-evening in comparison with OD-morning ( = <0.01), but not in comparison with BID. Furthermore, RP levels were similar at 8.00 AM, but statistically significantly reduced at 8.00 PM after OD-evening ( = .01) and BID ( = .02) in comparison with OD-morning. OD-evening aspirin intake results in higher levels of platelet inhibition during early morning hours and results in a reduction of RP levels in the evening. These findings may, if confirmed by larger studies, be relevant to large groups of patients taking aspirin to reduce cardiovascular risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09537104.2020.1809643DOI Listing
August 2020