Publications by authors named "G D Lundberg"

430 Publications

Advocacy to End Sexual Harassment: Voices From Women in Cardiology.

JACC Case Rep 2021 Jun 19;3(6):975-977. Epub 2021 May 19.

Department of Internal Medicine/Cardiology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaccas.2021.04.029DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8311341PMC
June 2021

Sexual Harassment, Victim Blaming, and the Potential Impact on Women in Cardiology.

JACC Case Rep 2021 Jun 19;3(6):978-981. Epub 2021 May 19.

Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Loma Linda University Health, Loma Linda, California, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaccas.2021.05.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8311362PMC
June 2021

How Feeling Like an Imposter Can Impede Your Success.

JACC Case Rep 2021 Feb 17;3(2):347-349. Epub 2021 Feb 17.

Department of Cardiology, St. Louis Heart and Vascular, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaccas.2021.01.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8310963PMC
February 2021

In-Hospital Complications in Pregnant Women With Current or Historical Cancer Diagnoses.

Mayo Clin Proc 2021 Jul 8. Epub 2021 Jul 8.

Keele Cardiovascular Research Group, School of Medicine, Keele University, Staffordshire, United Kingdom; The Heart Centre, University Hospital of North Midlands, Stoke-on-Trent, United Kingdom.

Objective: To assess the temporal trends, characteristics and comorbidities, and in-hospital cardiovascular and obstetric complications and outcomes of pregnant women with current or historical cancer diagnosis at the time of admission for delivery.

Methods: We analyzed delivery hospitalizations with or without current or historical cancer between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2014, from the US National Inpatient Sample database.

Results: We included 43,132,097 delivery hospitalizations with no cancer, 39,118 with current cancer, and 67,336 with historical diagnosis of cancer. The 5 most common types of current cancer were hematologic, thyroid, cervical, skin, and breast cancer. Women with current and historical cancer were older (29 years and 32 years vs 27 years) and incurred higher hospital costs ($4131 and $4078 vs $3521) compared with women without cancer. Most of the cancer types were associated with preterm birth (hematologic: adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.48 [95% CI, 1.35 to 1.62]; cervical: aOR, 1.47 [95% CI, 1.32 to 1.63]; breast: aOR, 1.93 [95% CI, 1.72 to 2.16]). Current hematologic cancer was associated with the highest risk of peripartum cardiomyopathy (aOR, 12.19 [95% CI, 7.75 to 19.19]), all-cause mortality (aOR, 6.50 [95% CI, 2.22 to 19.07]), arrhythmia (aOR, 3.82 [95% CI, 2.04 to 7.15]), and postpartum hemorrhage (aOR, 1.31 [95% CI, 1.11 to 1.54]). Having a current or historical cancer diagnosis did not confer additional risk for stillbirth; however, metastases increased the risk of maternal mortality and preterm birth.

Conclusion: Women with a current or historical diagnosis of cancer at delivery have more comorbidities compared with women without cancer. Clinicians should communicate the risks of multisystem complications to these complex patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mayocp.2021.03.038DOI Listing
July 2021

Cardiovascular risk in menopausal women and our evolving understanding of menopausal hormone therapy: risks, benefits, and current guidelines for use.

Ther Adv Endocrinol Metab 2021 30;12:20420188211013917. Epub 2021 Apr 30.

Department of Medicine, Emory University, 137 Johnson Ferry Rd, Suite 1200, Marietta, GA 30068, USA.

Women are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with men. While traditional risk factors for CVD seem to disproportionately affect women and contribute to this disparity, increased prevalence of CVD at midlife calls into question the contribution of menopause. Given the potential role that declining hormone levels play in this transition, menopause hormone therapies (MHT) have been proposed as a strategy for risk factor reduction. Unfortunately, trials have not consistently shown cardiovascular benefit with use, and several describe significant risks. Notably, the timing of hormone administration seems to play a role in its relative risks and benefits. At present, MHT is not recommended for primary or secondary prevention of CVD. For women who may benefit from the associated vasomotor, genitourinary, and/or bone health properties of MHT, CVD risks should be taken into account prior to administration. Further research is needed to assess routes, dosing, and formulations of MHT in order to elucidate appropriate timing for administration. Here, we aim to review both traditional and sex-specific risk factors contributing to increased CVD risk in women with a focus on menopause, understand cardiovascular effects of MHT through a review of several landmark clinical trials, summarize guidelines for appropriate MHT use, and discuss a comprehensive strategy for reducing CV risk in women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/20420188211013917DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8111523PMC
April 2021
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