Publications by authors named "G Bruce Mann"

1,491 Publications

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Quality Nutrition Education Materials for Pregnant or Lactating Women and Children Ages 0-24 Months Old.

J Nutr Educ Behav 2021 May;53(5):369

Bradley University, SNEB Nutrition Education for Children Division, Chair-Elect.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jneb.2021.03.009DOI Listing
May 2021

Becoming a Training and Supervising Analyst: Interviews from the Columbia Postgraduate Analytic Practice Study.

Int J Psychoanal 2020 Apr;101(2):300-319

Columbia Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA.

Although much has been written about the training and supervising analyst system (TSA), its role in analysts' professional development has not been empirically studied. The Columbia Psychoanalytic Practice Study (CPAPS) is a longitudinal study of the careers of graduates from the Columbia Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research. Interviews with 29/37 (78%) analysts graduating from 2003-2009 were analyzed using grounded theory. Our research question was: Are Columbia Center graduates interested in becoming TSAs and what factors influence their success in reaching this goal?Many analysts express interest in pursuing TSA appointment (22/29, 76%), however, a vast majority (26/29, 90%) experience challenges with finding cases, finances, and the work involved at a life stage with competing priorities. Fewer graduates become TSAs than express initial interest, suggesting that graduates find alternate pathways for professional development. While it is vital that institutes mentor graduates to take on a variety of postgraduate roles as educators, researchers, clinicians and scholars, our findings suggest that if the TSA qualification process were more user-friendly (less time-consuming, financially viable, and in step with current practice norms) more graduate analysts would sustain their interest in this career path.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00207578.2019.1696656DOI Listing
April 2020

A single-cell RNA expression atlas of normal, preneoplastic and tumorigenic states in the human breast.

EMBO J 2021 May 5:e107333. Epub 2021 May 5.

ACRF Cancer Biology and Stem Cells Division, The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Parkville, Vic, Australia.

To examine global changes in breast heterogeneity across different states, we determined the single-cell transcriptomes of > 340,000 cells encompassing normal breast, preneoplastic BRCA1 tissue, the major breast cancer subtypes, and pairs of tumors and involved lymph nodes. Elucidation of the normal breast microenvironment revealed striking changes in the stroma of post-menopausal women. Single-cell profiling of 34 treatment-naive primary tumors, including estrogen receptor (ER) , HER2 , and triple-negative breast cancers, revealed comparable diversity among cancer cells and a discrete subset of cycling cells. The transcriptomes of preneoplastic BRCA1 tissue versus tumors highlighted global changes in the immune microenvironment. Within the tumor immune landscape, proliferative CD8 T cells characterized triple-negative and HER2 cancers but not ER tumors, while all subtypes comprised cycling tumor-associated macrophages, thus invoking potentially different immunotherapy targets. Copy number analysis of paired ER tumors and lymph nodes indicated seeding by genetically distinct clones or mass migration of primary tumor cells into axillary lymph nodes. This large-scale integration of patient samples provides a high-resolution map of cell diversity in normal and cancerous human breast.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.15252/embj.2020107333DOI Listing
May 2021

Birth cohort-specific trends of sun-related behaviors among individuals from an international consortium of melanoma-prone families.

BMC Public Health 2021 Apr 23;21(1):692. Epub 2021 Apr 23.

Department of Dermatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Background: Individuals from melanoma-prone families have similar or reduced sun-protective behaviors compared to the general population. Studies on trends in sun-related behaviors have been temporally and geographically limited.

Methods: Individuals from an international consortium of melanoma-prone families (GenoMEL) were retrospectively asked about sunscreen use, sun exposure (time spent outside), sunburns, and sunbed use at several timepoints over their lifetime. Generalized linear mixed models were used to examine the association between these outcomes and birth cohort defined by decade spans, after adjusting for covariates.

Results: A total of 2407 participants from 547 families across 17 centers were analyzed. Sunscreen use increased across subsequent birth cohorts, and although the likelihood of sunburns increased until the 1950s birth cohort, it decreased thereafter. Average sun exposure did not change across the birth cohorts, and the likelihood of sunbed use increased in more recent birth cohorts. We generally did not find any differences in sun-related behavior when comparing melanoma cases to non-cases. Melanoma cases had increased sunscreen use, decreased sun exposure, and decreased odds of sunburn and sunbed use after melanoma diagnosis compared to before diagnosis.

Conclusions: Although sunscreen use has increased and the likelihood of sunburns has decreased in more recent birth cohorts, individuals in melanoma-prone families have not reduced their overall sun exposure and had an increased likelihood of sunbed use in more recent birth cohorts. These observations demonstrate partial improvements in melanoma prevention and suggest that additional intervention strategies may be needed to achieve optimal sun-protective behavior in melanoma-prone families.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-021-10424-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8063451PMC
April 2021

Impact of Intervention on College Students' Vending Selections.

J Am Coll Health 2021 Apr 2:1-7. Epub 2021 Apr 2.

Department of Nutrition and Hospitality Management, The University of Mississippi, University, Oxford, Mississippi, USA.

Objectives: To place in vending machines and determine if different sales strategies affect selection.

Participants: University students living in resident halls.

Methods: Vending machines included 50% and 50% non compliant snacks. Three sales strategies targeted student selection of : Reduced price, signage, and nutrition education activities. Three-way ANOVA was used for analysis.

Results: There was a statistically significant three-way interaction on snack selection between sales strategy, study period, and snack type, (4, 77) = 3.33, = .01. There were no statistically significant simple two-way interaction between study period and sales strategy for either , (1, 77) = 1.62,  = 0.18, or NC snack types, (1, 77) = 2.02,  = 0.07.

Conclusions: Sales strategies did not affect selections. Advocates for healthier snacks in vending machines can align with
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07448481.2021.1909048DOI Listing
April 2021