Publications by authors named "G Baniulyte"

8 Publications

How strong is the link between periodontitis and stroke?

Evid Based Dent 2021 01;22(1):10-11

Oral Sciences, Glasgow Dental Hospital and School, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8TA, UK.

Data sources PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library, LILACS, OpenGrey and Google Scholar. No language restriction applied; studies conducted until September 2018.Study selection Observational studies in humans exposed and not exposed to periodontitis, in which the primary outcome was the risk of cerebrovascular accident, including haemorrhagic and ischaemic attacks (transient ischaemic attack and ischaemic stroke).Data extraction and synthesis Three examiners conducted a literature search. Duplicates, opinion articles, technical articles, guides and animal studies were excluded. Quality assessment was carried out followed by assessment of risk of bias. The extracted data were analysed using RevMan software. The meta-analysis looked for odds ratio (OR) in case-control studies and risk ratio (RR) in cohort studies as well as their 95% confidence intervals.Results Ten studies were included, all showing low risk of bias. The number of patients ranged from 80 to 15,792 with follow-up duration from 0 to 15 years. The studies showed variable heterogeneity. For stroke in case-control studies (seven studies), the overall heterogeneity was considerable (I2 = 77%). For ischaemic stroke in case-control studies (five studies), the overall heterogeneity was considerable (I2 = 72%), but after an outlying study was removed (I2 = 78%), it reduced significantly (I2 = 4%). For stroke in cohort studies (three studies), null heterogeneity was observed (I2 = 0%). The meta-analysis informed the three main outcomes: 1) individuals with periodontitis were twice as likely to suffer stroke (OR 2.31 [1.39, 3.84], p = 0.001, I2 = 77%); 2) individuals with periodontitis were twice as likely to suffer ischaemic stroke (OR 2.72 [2.00, 3.71], p <0.00001, I2 = 4%); and 3) individuals with periodontitis had a higher risk of experiencing stroke (RR 1.88 [1.55, 2.28], p <0.00001). Overall, the authors found that stroke events were associated with periodontitis.Conclusions The meta-analysis suggests an association between risk of stroke and periodontal disease. However, there is a need for prospective studies to ascertain the relationship between periodontal disease severity and stroke severity; whether there is an impact of periodontal treatment and to review whether periodontal disease impacts on stroke survival.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41432-021-0161-7DOI Listing
January 2021

Regulatory roles of 5' UTR and ORF-internal RNAs detected by 3' end mapping.

Elife 2021 Jan 18;10. Epub 2021 Jan 18.

Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, United States.

Many bacterial genes are regulated by RNA elements in their 5´ untranslated regions (UTRs). However, the full complement of these elements is not known even in the model bacterium . Using complementary RNA-sequencing approaches, we detected large numbers of 3´ ends in 5´ UTRs and open reading frames (ORFs), suggesting extensive regulation by premature transcription termination. We documented regulation for multiple transcripts, including spermidine induction involving Rho and translation of an upstream ORF for an mRNA encoding a spermidine efflux pump. In addition to discovering novel sites of regulation, we detected short, stable RNA fragments derived from 5´ UTRs and sequences internal to ORFs. Characterization of three of these transcripts, including an RNA internal to an essential cell division gene, revealed that they have independent functions as sRNA sponges. Thus, these data uncover an abundance of - and -acting RNA regulators in bacterial 5´ UTRs and internal to ORFs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.62438DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7815308PMC
January 2021

Postoperative delirium in patients with head and neck oral cancer in the West of Scotland.

Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2021 04 11;59(3):353-361. Epub 2020 Sep 11.

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Govan Road, Glasgow, G51 4TF. Electronic address:

Our aims were to determine the prevalence and association of postoperative delirium (POD) in head and neck (H&N) cancer patients undergoing free flap reconstruction at the oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) unit, Queen Elizabeth University Hospital (QEUH) Glasgow, and to assess whether these determinants can be modified to optimise patient care and reduce the occurrence of POD. Delirium remains an important problem in the postoperative care of patients undergoing major H&N surgery, and early detection and management improve overall outcomes. The patient database containing details of the preoperative physical status (including alcohol misuse, chronic comorbidity, and physiological status) of 1006 patients who underwent major H&N surgery with free-flap repair at the QEUH from 2009-2019, was analysed. Factors associated with delirium were studied, identifying univariate associations as well as multivariate models to determine independent risk factors. The incidence of POD was 7.5% (75/1006; 53 male:22 female; mean (SD) age 65.41 (13.16) years). POD was strongly associated with pre-existing medical comorbidities, excess alcohol, smoking, a prolonged surgical operating time (more than 700 minutes), tracheostomy, blood transfusion, and bony free flaps. Those with POD were at an increased risk of postoperative wound and lung complications, and were more likely to require a hospital stay of more than 21 days. Presurgical assessment should identify risk factors to optimise the diagnosis and treatment of POD, and will enhance patient care by reducing further medical and surgical complications, and overall hospital stay.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjoms.2020.08.116DOI Listing
April 2021

Transcription termination and antitermination of bacterial CRISPR arrays.

Elife 2020 10 30;9. Epub 2020 Oct 30.

Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, United States.

A hallmark of CRISPR-Cas immunity systems is the CRISPR array, a genomic locus consisting of short, repeated sequences ('repeats') interspersed with short, variable sequences ('spacers'). CRISPR arrays are transcribed and processed into individual CRISPR RNAs that each include a single spacer, and direct Cas proteins to complementary sequences in invading nucleic acid. Most bacterial CRISPR array transcripts are unusually long for untranslated RNA, suggesting the existence of mechanisms to prevent premature transcription termination by Rho, a conserved bacterial transcription termination factor that rapidly terminates untranslated RNA. We show that Rho can prematurely terminate transcription of bacterial CRISPR arrays, and we identify a widespread antitermination mechanism that antagonizes Rho to facilitate complete transcription of CRISPR arrays. Thus, our data highlight the importance of transcription termination and antitermination in the evolution of bacterial CRISPR-Cas systems.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.58182DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7665894PMC
October 2020
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