Publications by authors named "Fusun Ozer"

80 Publications

Effect of Different Light-Curing Modes on Bond Strength of Ceramic Laminate Veneers.

Int J Prosthodont 2021 Mar-Apr;34(2):221-228

Purpose: To investigate whether high-level irradiance and short light exposure times with light-emitting diode (LED) curing units could provide bond strength comparable to halogen lights for ceramic laminate veneers (CLVs).

Materials And Methods: A total of 160 extracted human maxillary central incisors were prepared to receive CLVs (lithium disilicate) in shades A1 and A3.5. CLVs were luted with light-curing (LC) and dual-curing (DC) resin cements using four protocols: 3 seconds in extra power mode, 8 seconds in high power mode, or 10 seconds in standard mode with an LED unit, or 40 seconds with a conventional halogen light from all aspects (n = 10). Following thermal cycles, shear bond strength test was performed with a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey test. Failure modes were classified under a stereomicroscope, and data were analyzed using Pearson chi-square test (P = .050).

Results: According to the intragroup comparison of different irradiation protocols, the mean shear bond strength of the A1-LC-10 group was found to be significantly higher than that of the A1-LChalogen group (P = .026). Shear bond strength values of the A1-LC-10 group and A3.5-LC-10 group were significantly higher than that of the A3.5-DC-10 group (P = .003). The A3.5-DC-3, A3.5-LC-3, and A1-DC-8 groups revealed the significantly most adhesive failures, and the A1-LC-8 group revealed the most mixed failures (P < .001).

Conclusion: Both light and dark ceramic shades with LC cement combination responded the best to the standard mode of 10-second exposure time with LED application. However, with conventional halogen light application, the highest bond strength values were obtained with DC cement and light ceramic shade combination.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.11607/ijp.7029DOI Listing
April 2021

Antimicrobial and Mechanical Effects of Zeolite Use in Dental Materials: A Systematic Review.

Acta Stomatol Croat 2021 Mar;55(1):76-89

Department of Preventive and Restorative Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Objective: Ion-incorporated zeolite is a widely used antimicrobial material studied for various dental applications. At present, there is no other systematic review that evaluates the effectiveness of zeolite in all dental materials. The purpose of this study was to review all available literature that analyzed the antimicrobial effects and/or mechanical properties of zeolite as a restorative material in dentistry.

Material And Methods: Following PRISMA guidelines, an exhaustive search of PubMed, Ovid Medline, Scopus, Embase, and the Dentistry & Oral Sciences Source was conducted. No language or time restrictions were used and the study was conducted from June 1, 2020 to August 17, 2020. Only full text articles were selected that pertained to the usage of zeolite in dental materials including composite resin, bonding agents, cements, restorative root material, cavity base material, prosthesis, implants, and endodontics.

Results: At the beginning of the study, 1534 studies were identified, of which 687 duplicate records were excluded. After screening for the title, abstract, and full texts, 35 articles remained and were included in the qualitative synthesis. An Inter-Rater Reliability (IRR) test, which included a percent user agreement and reliability percent, was conducted for each of the 35 articles chosen.

Conclusion: Although ion-incorporated zeolite may enhance the antimicrobial properties of dental materials, the mechanical properties of some materials, such as MTA and acrylic resin, may be compromised. Therefore, since the decrease in mechanical properties depends on zeolite concentration in the restorative material, it is generally recommended to add 0.2-2% zeolite by weight.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.15644/asc55/1/9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8033625PMC
March 2021

Variable kinship patterns in Neolithic Anatolia revealed by ancient genomes.

Curr Biol 2021 Jun 14;31(11):2455-2468.e18. Epub 2021 Apr 14.

Institute of Human Biology and Evolution, Faculty of Biology, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland.

The social organization of the first fully sedentary societies that emerged during the Neolithic period in Southwest Asia remains enigmatic, mainly because material culture studies provide limited insight into this issue. However, because Neolithic Anatolian communities often buried their dead beneath domestic buildings, household composition and social structure can be studied through these human remains. Here, we describe genetic relatedness among co-burials associated with domestic buildings in Neolithic Anatolia using 59 ancient genomes, including 22 new genomes from Aşıklı Höyük and Çatalhöyük. We infer pedigree relationships by simultaneously analyzing multiple types of information, including autosomal and X chromosome kinship coefficients, maternal markers, and radiocarbon dating. In two early Neolithic villages dating to the 9th and 8th millennia BCE, Aşıklı Höyük and Boncuklu, we discover that siblings and parent-offspring pairings were frequent within domestic structures, which provides the first direct indication of close genetic relationships among co-burials. In contrast, in the 7th millennium BCE sites of Çatalhöyük and Barcın, where we study subadults interred within and around houses, we find close genetic relatives to be rare. Hence, genetic relatedness may not have played a major role in the choice of burial location at these latter two sites, at least for subadults. This supports the hypothesis that in Çatalhöyük, and possibly in some other Neolithic communities, domestic structures may have served as burial location for social units incorporating biologically unrelated individuals. Our results underscore the diversity of kin structures in Neolithic communities during this important phase of sociocultural development.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2021.03.050DOI Listing
June 2021

Evaluation of human pulp tissue response following direct pulp capping with a self-etching adhesive system containing MDPB.

Dent Mater J 2021 May 10;40(3):689-696. Epub 2021 Mar 10.

Department of Preventive and Restorative Sciences, University of Pennsylvania.

This study evaluated the human pulp tissue response following direct pulp capping with Clearfil Protect Bond (CPB) self-etching adhesive containing an antibacterial monomer MDPB. The pulps of third molar teeth were exposed by the removal of carious tissue. In an experimental group, CPB was applied to the exposed pulp and dentin. In the control groups, Clearfil SE Bond (CSE) or calcium hydroxide-based cement (CH) was applied to the exposed pulp surfaces. All teeth were filled with resin composite, extracted after 90 days, and the pulp responses were histologically analyzed. No severe inflammation or soft tissue disorganization was observed in CPB and CH groups. CSE group exhibited a disorganized odontoblastic layer and severe inflammatory infiltration. No hard tissue formation was observed in CSE group, and CH formed more of a hard tissue formation than CPB. CPB induced an acceptable healing response when directly applied to exposed pulps with bacterial contamination.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4012/dmj.2020-145DOI Listing
May 2021

Demography of swordfish (Xiphias gladius Linneus) populations from the coasts of Turkey, based on mitochondrial DNA and microsatellites.

J Fish Biol 2021 Feb 8. Epub 2021 Feb 8.

Department of Biological Sciences, Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey.

The genetic diversity of the Mediterranean swordfish (Xiphias gladius Linneus) has not been explored extensively at its easternmost range so far. In this study, modern X. gladius samples from the eastern part of the Mediterranean basin, north of the Aegean Sea (Aegean-2013, n = 26) and the Mediterranean coast of Turkey (N.Levantine-2013, n = 42) were studied genetically, along with ancient samples from Yenikapı excavation (n = 6). Partial mitochondrial DNA control region sequences (entire sequences, clade I and clade II) were evaluated spatially and temporally together with previously published sequences (Alvarado Bremer et al., Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 2005, 36, 169-187; Viñas et al., ICES Journal of Marine Science, 2010, 67, 1222-1229; Righi et al., Diversity, 2020, 12, 170) from the rest of the Mediterranean Sea. Pair-wise F and pair-wise AMOVA tests showed that, in general, groups of eastern populations and western Mediterranean populations have not genetically differed from each other significantly nearly in the past 20 years. Therefore, the results direct reconsideration of previous descriptions of population sub-structure within the Mediterranean and support high gene flow throughout the region. On the contrary, the results of this study confirmed the existence of genetic diversity differences between western and eastern Mediterranean, with eastern being low. One-tailed permutation tests revealed that θ, which is directly proportional to long-term female effective population size (Ne), decreased significantly (P < 0.05) in both regions over the past two decades. On the Turkish coasts, θ is not significantly different from that of the nearly contemporary eastern Mediterranean population. Nonetheless, θ of the ancient sample was consistently and significantly (P < 0.001) higher than those of the eastern and western Mediterranean populations in clade I and clade II. Furthermore, it contains two mitochondrial haplotypes that are not observed in modern samples, suggesting that the Ne of X. gladius in the eastern was high in Byzantium times. Eight microsatellite loci were also genotyped in modern samples. The microsatellite-based present Ne estimate of the pooled Aegean-2013 and N.Levantine-2013 populations was lower than 1000 according to the upper limit of 95% c.i. and possibly even lower than 100 according to the mean of posterior distribution of the present Ne estimate calculated by the software package MSVAR. These alarming genetic signals for the sustainability of X. gladius on the coasts of Turkey are in agreement with the nearly collapsing X. gladius fisheries as depicted also in the fisheries statistics. Overall, congruent with the previous studies, the data presented here show that sustainability of the X. gladius population in Mediterranean is under major threat. Therefore, X. gladius around the Turkish coasts need an immediate stringent action and management plan.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jfb.14696DOI Listing
February 2021

Evaluation of the Antibacterial Effects of Single and Combined use of Different Irrigation Solutions Against Intracanal .

Acta Stomatol Croat 2020 Sep;54(3):250-262

Department of Preventive and Restorative Sciences, School of Dental Medicine University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Objectives: This study assessed the antibacterial activity of both separate and combined uses of 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 2% chlorhexidine (CHX), 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), 3% hydrogen peroxide (HO), MTAD, SmearClear (SC) and 13.8% chlorine dioxide (ClO) irrigation solutions against

Materials And Methods: Two hundred eighty single rooted human premolars were randomly grouped into 26 test and 2 control (negative and positive) groups and were incubated for 24 h with , except for the negative control group. The tested solutions were as follow: NaOCl; CHX; ClO; MTAD; SC; EDTA; HO; NaOCl + CHX; NaOCl + MTAD; SC + NaOCl; EDTA + NaOCl; HO + NaOCl; ClO + CHX; CHX + MTAD; SC + CHX; EDTA + CHX; CHX + HO; ClO + MTAD; SC + ClO; EDTA + ClO; ClO HO; SC+MTAD; EDTA+MTAD; MTAD + HO; SC + HO and EDTA + HO Optic density values were recorded at 0, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, 42 and 48 h and bacterial growth curve created for each solution.

Results: The CHX, MTAD and ClO showed a high potential for the elimination of both alone and in all combinations. The EDTA, HO, HO+ EDTA, HO + NaOCl and SC + NaOCl groups showed less antibacterial activity than the other groups. The SC + CHX group showed the best antibacterial effect against .

Conclusion: The SC + CHX combination can be recommended as the most effective irrigation regimen against in persistent endodontic infections.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.15644/asc54/3/3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7586900PMC
September 2020

Effect of surface treatment and cleaning on the bond strength to polymer-infiltrated ceramic network CAD-CAM material.

J Prosthet Dent 2020 Oct 26. Epub 2020 Oct 26.

Professor of Restorative Dentistry and Chairman, Department of Preventive and Restorative Sciences, Assistant Dean, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, Philadelphia, Pa.

Statement Of Problem: Optimal composite resin bonds to polymer-infiltrated ceramic network (PICN) computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) materials are essential for clinical success. However, comparative bond strength studies on the influence of different etching and cleaning methods on these materials are lacking.

Purpose: The purpose of this in vitro study was to measure and compare the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of a composite resin cement with that of a PICN material after different surface treatment and cleaning methods.

Material And Methods: Seventy specimens of a CAD-CAM PICN were divided into 7 groups (n=10): no treatment (control), hydrofluoric acid etching for 20 seconds (HF20), 60 seconds (HF60), 120 seconds (HF120), HF20 + phosphoric acid for 60 seconds and ultrasonic bath for 5 minutes, HF60 + PH, and HF120 + PH. After surface treatment, a silane coupling agent and composite resin cement were applied. Microshear bond strength was determined, and data were analyzed with 1-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc multiple comparison tests (α=.05).

Results: All HF acid treatments resulted in a significant increase in bond strength to the polymer-infiltrated ceramic network material (P=.02). Bond strength values for HF etching for 20 seconds were significantly lower than those for 60 seconds and 120 seconds (P=.034). No difference was found between 60 seconds and 120 seconds of HF etching time (P=.986). Additional surface treatment with phosphoric acid 60 seconds and ultrasonic bath 5 minutes did not improve the bond strength beyond values obtained by hydrofluoric acid treatment only (P=.834). Most failures were cohesive.

Conclusions: Acid etching and surface treatment have significant effects on composite resin bond strength to a PICN CAD-CAM material. HF etching for 60 seconds or 120 seconds provides the highest bond strengths. Cleaning methods after etching did not have any significant effect on bond strength.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prosdent.2020.08.016DOI Listing
October 2020

Effects of Lutein on Brain Damage and Vasospasm in an Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Model.

World Neurosurg 2020 11 1;143:e450-e455. Epub 2020 Aug 1.

Department of Neurosurgery, Tepecik Research and Training Hospital, University of Health Sciences, Izmir, Turkey.

Objective: Vasospasm developing after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is an important cause of mortality and morbidity. Lutein is a carotenoid with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of present study was to investigate effects of lutein on the basilar artery and nerve tissues.

Methods: Wistar rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: control (group 1), SAH (group 2), and SAH treated with lutein (group 3). Lutein was administered for 3 days by means of orogastric gavage. Basilar artery lumen area, wall thickness, serum total antioxidant status, serum total oxidant status, and oxidative stress index were calculated. Histopathologic and immunohistochemical analyses were conducted.

Results: No statistically significant difference was found between groups in terms of wall thickness; lumen area; and serum total antioxidant status, serum total oxidant status, and oxidative stress index values. A statistically significant difference was found between groups colored with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (P < 0.005). Post hoc analysis was used to examine the results between groups. Results of group 1 and group 3 were equal (P = 1) and lower than group 2 (P = 0.04 and P = 0.006, respectively).

Conclusions: Lutein was found to have a positive effect on width of the basilar artery lumen area. Therefore, positive effects of lutein on vasospasm might be statistically significant if lutein is administered at higher doses. Lutein was found to be effective in preventing brain damage after SAH. To our knowledge, this study is the first in the literature to examine the effect of lutein on vasospasm and brain damage after SAH.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2020.07.186DOI Listing
November 2020

Assaying endogenous matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in acid-etched dentinal cavity walls.

Dent Mater J 2019 Dec 11;38(6):934-939. Epub 2019 Sep 11.

Department of Preventive and Restorative Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania.

Endogenous dentinal matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been implicated in the auto-degradation of collagen fibrils within resin infiltrated layers of dentinal attachment. In order to target these proteinases, we must know which MMPs are produced and activated at the resin/dentin interface. In this study, we have optimized an extraction procedure and quantitated levels of endogenous MMPs in samples of dentin removed from the cavity walls of a single, extracted tooth. In our tooth-cavity model, an occlusal cavity (2×4×2 mm) was prepared and removed from the tooth crown, leaving surrounding dentinal walls of 1-mm-thick. The samples were pulverized with an analytic mill. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), an average of 34.7 picograms of MMP-9 was detected in less than 300 mg of dentinal powder. This is the first study of its kind to quantitate endogenous levels of MMP in dentinal protein isolated from the cavity walls of a single, extracted tooth.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4012/dmj.2018-342DOI Listing
December 2019

Effects of Glycogen Synthase Kinase Inhibitor on Glioblastoma Multiforme Cell Line via Apoptosis and Cell Signaling Pathways.

Turk Neurosurg 2019 ;29(4):513-521

University of Health Sciences, Tepecik Training and Research Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Izmir, Turkey.

Aim: To investigate the apoptotic and molecular effects of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM).

Material And Methods: Human primary glioblastoma cell line (U-87 MG) and the human fetal glial cell line (SVGp12) were used. The cells were exposed to the different doses of GSK inhibitor for 24, 48 and 72 hours. Induction of apoptosis was assessed by DNA fragmentation (TUNEL) assay. EGFR and NF-kB expression was evaluated by immunofluorescence analyses.

Results: GSK-3 inhibitor IX induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in dose-dependent manner in GBM cells. Our results indicated that GSK-3 inhibitor IX induces apoptosis, resulting in a significant decrease in the expression of NF-kB and EGF.

Conclusion: Inhibition through GSK-3 has been found promising in creating therapeutic management of GBM cells. Proliferation, differentiation, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis are mechanisms that must be interpreted as a whole. Components associated with EGFR, NF-kB, and apoptosis affect the mechanism solely and collectively. Our collective data suggest that GSK-3 inhibitor IX inhibited cellular proliferation and induced apoptotic events by modulating EGFR and NF-kB expression in GBM cells. GSK-3 inhibition holds promise for the development of new approaches for the therapeutic management of GBM cells.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5137/1019-5149.JTN.23987-18.2DOI Listing
October 2019

Does Decompressive Duraplasty Have a Neuroprotective Effect on Spinal Trauma?: An Experimental Study.

World Neurosurg 2019 Jun 26;126:e288-e294. Epub 2019 Feb 26.

Department of Neurosurgery, Tepecik Research and Training Hospital, University of Health Sciences, Izmir, Turkey.

Background: Spinal cord injury (SCI) may result in neuromotor, sensory, and autonomic function damages. Edema because of spinal cord trauma can reach serious dimensions. The aim of this study was to histologically evaluate the effects of duraplasty on neural tissues.

Methods: Twenty-eight Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 experimental groups: group 1 received laminectomy without SCI (sham); group 2 received laminectomy and SCI with the weight drop method; group 3 received laminectomy, SCI, and duraplasty within the first 6-8 hours of SCI; and group 4 received laminectomy, SCI, and duraplasty after 24 hours of SCI. The neurologic functions of the rats were tested periodically. All animals were euthanized 28 days after the surgery. Histopathologic and immunohistochemical evaluations were performed, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used for statistical comparison of data between the groups.

Results: There was no significant difference in the Tarlov examination scores from different time points between the groups. The number of neurons stained with nuclear factor kappa beta was higher in group 3 than groups 1 and 4. The number of neurons stained with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling was higher in group 2 than group 3.

Conclusions: Decompressive laminectomy is a procedure frequently used in spinal trauma surgery. However, it is often unclear whether the decompression is fully adequate. Our results will aid the development of further studies regarding the reliability of duraplasty in the treatment of SCI.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2019.02.043DOI Listing
June 2019

How Safe is the Use of Intrathecal Fluorescein? An Experimental Study.

Turk Neurosurg 2019 ;29(4):549-554

University of Health Sciences, Tepecik Training and Research Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Izmir, Turkey.

Aim: To investigate the effects of fluorescein-sodium on neural tissues.

Material And Methods: Twenty-one Wistar rats were randomly divided into three experimental groups: control (group 1) and fluorescein-sodium groups with different doses (groups 2 and 3). In the control group, craniectomy following with durotomy was performed with the help of a loupe microscope, and a dry sponge was overlayed to the brain tissue. In the study groups, the open dura was covered with a sponge soaked with 0.02 mg (group 2) and with 0.2 mg (group 3) fluorescein sodium following craniectomy. Three weeks postoperatively, rats were sacrificed for the histopathologic evaluations.

Results: Fluorescein-induced apoptosis occurs in a dose-dependent manner in rats' neurons. It was determined that neuron and neuroglial cell TUNEL staining was statistically different among the three groups (p < 0.001). Our results indicated that fluorescein induces apoptosis, resulting in increased nuclear factor kappa beta (NF-kβ) expression in a dose-dependent manner.

Conclusion: Fluorescein sodium is used frequently during surgery for CSF fistulas. However, information in the literature about its safety is insufficient. Our study holds promise for the development of new studies on the reliability of this agent.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5137/1019-5149.JTN.24085-18.3DOI Listing
October 2019

Influence of cleaning methods on bond strength to saliva contaminated zirconia.

J Esthet Restor Dent 2018 11 30;30(6):551-556. Epub 2018 Oct 30.

Department of Preventive and Restorative Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Objective: To evaluate the influence of saliva contamination and cleaning procedures on shear bond strength (SBS) of a self-adhesive resin cement (SAC) to zirconia surfaces.

Materials And Methods: A total of 160 sandblasted zirconia blocks were randomly divided into eight groups as follows: No saliva contamination, no cleansing (NC-NC); contamination with saliva, no cleansing (SC-NC); no saliva contamination, cleansing with a zirconia primer (ZP; Z-Bond, Danville Materials, Inc., S. Ramon, California) (NC-ZP); contamination with saliva, cleansing with ZP (SC-ZP); no saliva contamination, cleansing with hydrofluoric acid (HF; Ultradent Porcelain Etch; Ultradent Products, South Jordan, Utah) followed by cleansing with ZP (NC-HF-ZP); contamination with saliva, cleansing with HF followed by cleansing with ZP (SC-HF-ZP); cleansing with ZP, contamination with saliva, cleansing with ZP (ZP-SC-ZP); application of ZP, contamination with saliva, cleansing with HF followed by cleansing with ZP (ZP-SC-HF-ZP). Cylindrical resin composite blocks were luted to the zirconia surfaces with SAC (Clearfil SA Cement Automix, Kuraray, Inc., Tokyo, Japan). Specimens were subjected to shear forces at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed with Analysis of Variance and Tukey tests (α = 0.05).

Results: The bond strength values to zirconia were significantly influenced by saliva contamination (P < .05). The SC-NC group showed the lowest bond strength values (5.6 ± 1.4 MPa; P < .05). All cleansing or pretreatment agents improved the bond strengths when compared to noncleansing groups, NC-NC and SC-NC.

Conclusion: In situations where saliva contamination is deemed unavoidable, application of ZP after try-in of the zirconia restoration could be beneficial for the accurate cementation.

Clinical Significance: During try-in sessions of fixed dental prostheses, zirconia ceramic restoration may come into contact with saliva and surfaces should be cleansed to obtain an optimal surface for adhesion. Application of zirconia primer to the sandblasted zirconia surface is recommended whether the surface is contaminated with saliva or not.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jerd.12416DOI Listing
November 2018

Shear bond strength of luting cements to fixed superstructure metal surfaces under various seating forces.

J Adv Prosthodont 2018 Oct 22;10(5):340-346. Epub 2018 Oct 22.

School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Purpose: In this study, the shear bond strengths (SBS) of luting cements to fixed superstructure metal surfaces under various seating forces were investigated.

Materials And Methods: Seven different cements [Polycarboxylate (PCC), Glass-Ionomer (GIC), Zinc phospahate (ZPC), Self-adhesive resin (RXU), Resin (C&B), and Temporary cements ((RXT) and (TCS))] were bonded to a total number of 224 square blocks (5×5×3 mm) made of one pure metal [Titanium (CP Ti) and two metal alloys [Gold-Platinum (Au-Pt) and Cobalt-Chrome (Co-Cr)] under 10 N and 50 N seating forces. SBS values were determined and data were analyzed with 3-way ANOVA. Pairwise comparisons and interactions among groups were analyzed with Tukey's simultaneous confidence intervals.

Results: Overall mean scores indicated that Co-Cr showed the highest SBS values (1.96±0.4) (<.00), while Au-Pt showed the lowest among all metals tested (1.57±0.4) (<.00). Except for PCC/CP Ti, RXU/CP Ti, and GIC/Au-Pt factor level combinations (<.00), the cements tested under 10 N seating force showed no significantly higher SBS values when compared to the values of those tested under 50 N seating force (>.05). The PCC cement showed the highest mean SBS score (3.59±0.07) among all cements tested (<.00), while the resin-based temporary luting cement RXT showed the lowest (0.39±0.07) (<.00).

Conclusion: Polycarboxylate cement provides reliable bonding performance to metal surfaces. Resin-based temporary luting cements can be used when retrievability is needed. GIC is not suitable for permanent cementation of fixed dental prostheses consisting of CP Ti or Au-Pt substructures.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4047/jap.2018.10.5.340DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6202435PMC
October 2018

Effects of different resin sealing therapies on nanoleakage within artificial non-cavitated enamel lesions.

Dent Mater J 2018 Nov 5;37(6):981-987. Epub 2018 Oct 5.

Department of Preventive and Restorative Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania.

The aim of this study was to evaluate nanoleakage within the different lesion-sealing therapies applied to artificial non-cavitated enamel lesions. Thirty-two human anterior teeth were used. Artificial subsurface enamel lesions were produced on the labial surfaces of teeth. The specimens were then randomly divided into three groups (n=10): Group I- Clinpro Sealant application; Group II- ExciTE F adhesive resin application; and Group III- ICON resin infiltrant application. Each group was further divided into two subgroups: control and thermocycler. Nanoleakage was calculated by the digital image analysis software. In the control and thermocycled groups, there was no statistically significant difference between the Groups I, II, and III (p>0.05). The only significant leakage scores were obtained between the Group III control and thermocycler groups (p=0.027). ICON infiltrant can be used as an alternative to dental adhesives and fissure sealants in the sealing of initial non-cavitated enamel lesions. But the resin may become more affected by the water sorption than other resin materials over time. More studies are needed to evaluate long-term durability of resin infiltrants.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4012/dmj.2017-027DOI Listing
November 2018

Superficial Siderosis of the Central Nervous System Due to Recurrent Surgeries of the Thoracic Spine: A Rare Case.

World Neurosurg 2018 Nov 27;119:384-388. Epub 2018 Aug 27.

Department of Neurosurgery, Tepecik Research and Training Hospital, University of Health Sciences, Izmir, Turkey.

Background: Superficial siderosis (SS) of the central nervous system is a rare condition caused by hemosiderin deposition in the subpial layers of the brain and spinal cord. Surgical complications are the primary factor for occurrence of secondary SS. We present a case of SS with an identified bleeding origin in the thoracic spine.

Case Description: A 58-year-old female patient experienced 9 months of continuous progressive dizziness, difficulty with mobilization, drop attacks, and lack of hearing. The patient also had an extensive history of thoracic spinal surgeries. She came to the hospital with gait imbalance. Gradient echo (GE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed hemosiderin deposition along the cerebellar folia and vermis. GE sequences are preferable in this diagnosis, because of higher sensitivity, and for detecting characteristic T2 hypointensity. The dural defect was repaired with an artificial dural patch in thoracal operation area. Clinical findings, imaging studies, intraoperative findings, and literature information are presented.

Conclusions: Performance of an open neurosurgical procedure to repair a dural defect in the presence of MRI confirmed that superficial siderosis is an optimal method and a crucial step to ensure the safe resolution of the condition and to break the circle of emergency admissions of a patient with a dural defect and a history of multiple spinal surgeries.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2018.08.140DOI Listing
November 2018

Recurrent Osteoma Overlying a Methylmethacrylate Bone Cement Cranioplasty: A Rare Case.

J Coll Physicians Surg Pak 2018 Jun;28(6):S102-S103

Department of Neurosurgery, Saglik Bilimleri University, Tepecik Research and Training Hospital, Izmir, Turkey.

Osteomas are generally benign tumors of the skull that affect all age groups and are diagnosed in the fourth or fifth decade of life, and are rare in childhood. Surgical resection is curative and malignant transformation is very rare. A 12-yearboy who had undergone a craniotomy for resection of a parietal osteoma four years ago, followed by a cranioplasty with methylmethacrylate bone cement, presented to our clinic with an expanding mass overlying the cranioplasty. Upon reoperation, the mass was totally excised, and the parietal cranial defect was repaired using methylmethacrylate bone cement. On histologic examination, the mass was found to be a recurrent osteoma overlying the methylmethacrylate bone cement. In this report, we discuss the etiologies of recurrence of osteoma and treatment options of these rare cases. We believe that this recurrence resulted from contamination of the surgical area and cranioplasty materials with osteoma material. Extensive washing of the cranioplasty materials and perioperative area may prevent recurrence of such tumors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.29271/jcpsp.2018.06.S102DOI Listing
June 2018

Ventriculoperitoneal shunt infections and re-infections in children: a multicentre retrospective study.

Br J Neurosurg 2018 Apr 28;32(2):196-200. Epub 2018 Apr 28.

a Marmara University School of Medicine , Istanbul , Turkey.

Purpose: Ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) is the most common treatment modality for hydrocephalus. However, VPS infection is a common and serious complication with high rates of mortality and morbidity. The objective of this study was to investigate causative agents and the management of VPS infections and to identify risk factors for re-infection in children.

Materials And Methods: Retrospective, multicentre study on patients with VPS infection at paediatric and neurosurgery departments in four tertiary medical centres in Turkey between January 2011 and September 2014.

Results: A total of 290 patients with VPS infections were identified during the study period. The aetiology of hydrocephalus was congenital malformations in 190 patients (65.5%). The most common symptom of shunt infection was fever in 108 (37.2%) cases. At least one pathogen was identified in 148 VPS infections (51%). The most commonly isolated pathogen was coagulase-negative staphylococci, which grew in 63 cases (42.5%), followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 22 cases (14.9%), Klebsiella pneumoniae in 15 cases (10.1%), and Staphylococcus aureus in 15 cases (10.1). The median duration of VPS infection was 2 months (range, 15 days to 60 months) after insertion of the shunt, with half (49.8%) occurring during the first month. VPS infection was treated by antibiotics and shunt removal in 211 cases (76.4%) and antibiotics alone without shunt removal in 65 patients (23.5%). Among the risk factors, CSF protein level greater than 100 mg/dL prior to VPS insertion was associated with a potential risk of re-infection (OR, 1.65; p =.01).

Conclusion: High protein levels (>100 mg/dL) before the re-insertion of a VPS may be a risk factor for VPS re-infection.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02688697.2018.1467373DOI Listing
April 2018

A Rare History: an Intracranial Nail Present for Over a Half-Century.

Acta Medica (Hradec Kralove) 2017;60(3):124-126

Tepecik Research and Training Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Izmir, Turkey.

We present a rare case of a patient with a persistent headache for many years found to have an intracranial nail present for nearly 65 years. The nail was found entering approximately 1 cm from the midline on the left side, passing below the superior sagittal sinus, with the tip 1.5 mm right of the frontal horn of the lateral ventricle. Treatment strategies designed to optimize outcome for intracranial foreign bodies and possible complications are discussed in this report. We also discuss the decision for surgical intervention for foreign bodies and the relevance of position of the foreign body.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.14712/18059694.2018.5DOI Listing
April 2018

Effect of rubbing force magnitude on bond strength of universal adhesives applied in self-etch mode.

Dent Mater J 2018 Jan 27;37(1):139-145. Epub 2017 Oct 27.

Department of Preventive and Restorative Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania.

This study investigated the effect of rubbing force magnitude on dentin bond strengths of multi-mode adhesives applied in self-etch mode. Seventy-two extracted human molar teeth were used. Two different universal adhesives Single Bond Universal (SB) and Clearfil Universal (CL) were applied onto dentin surfaces in three different modes: without rubbing (NR), rubbing with 40 gf (gram-force) (40) or 80 gf (80) load. Teeth were restored with a resin composite. Half of the specimens were subject to thermal aging (10,000 cycles). Microtensile bond strength was measured and data were statistically analyzed with two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Baseline bond strength values for CL adhesive were improved by rubbing (40 and 80 gf) as compared to no rubbing (p<0.05). Rubbing did not significantly improve bond strength values for SB, regardless of aging (p>0.05). Rubbing improves bonding performance of some universal adhesives to dentin when applied in self-etch mode.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4012/dmj.2017-018DOI Listing
January 2018

Effect of thickness and surface modifications on flexural strength of monolithic zirconia.

J Prosthet Dent 2018 Jun 14;119(6):987-993. Epub 2017 Oct 14.

Professor and Chair, Department of Preventive and Restorative Sciences, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, Philadelphia, Pa.

Statement Of Problem: A recommended minimum thickness for monolithic zirconia restorations has not been reported. Assessing a proper thickness that has the necessary load-bearing capacity but also conserves dental hard tissues is essential.

Purpose: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of thickness and surface modifications on monolithic zirconia after simulated masticatory stresses.

Material And Methods: Monolithic zirconia disks (10 mm in diameter) were fabricated with 1.3 mm and 0.8 mm thicknesses. For each thickness, 21 disks were fabricated. The specimens of each group were further divided into 3 subgroups (n=7) according to the surface treatments applied: untreated (control), airborne-particle abrasion with 50-μm AlO particles at a pressure of 400 kPa at 10 mm, and grinding with a diamond rotary instrument followed by polishing. The biaxial flexure strength was determined by using a piston-on-3-balls technique in a universal testing machine. Flexural loading was applied with a 1.4-mm diameter steel cylinder, centered on the disk, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture occurred. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses were performed. The data were statistically analyzed with 2-way ANOVA, Tamhane T2, 1-way ANOVA, and Student t tests (α=.05).

Results: The 1.3-mm specimens had significantly higher flexural strength than the 0.8-mm specimens (P<.05). Airborne-particle abrasion significantly increased the flexural strength (P<.05). Grinding and polishing did not affect the flexural strength of the specimens (P>.05).

Conclusions: The mean flexural strength of 0.8-mm and 1.3-mm thick monolithic zirconia was greater than reported masticatory forces. Airborne-particle abrasion increased the flexural strength of monolithic zirconia. Grinding did not affect flexural strength if subsequently polished.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prosdent.2017.08.007DOI Listing
June 2018

Flexural strength of fiber reinforced posts after mechanical aging by simulated chewing forces.

J Mech Behav Biomed Mater 2018 01 5;77:135-139. Epub 2017 Sep 5.

University of Pennsylvania, School of Dental Medicine, Department of Preventive and Restorative Sciences, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

This study evaluated the effect of simulated chewing forces on the flexural strength of fiber reinforced posts (FRPs). Four different brands of FRPs were selected as main group for the study: RelyX Fiber Post (RX), IceLight (ICE), Unicore Posts (UC), FlouroPost (FP). Ten posts in each main group didn't receive any aging process and tested as baseline (BL), other ten posts were subjected to simulated chewing forces/mechanical aging (MA) as follows: Post spaces were prepared in acrylic with drill. Depth of preparation was adjusted to leave 4-mm coronal part of posts protruding from canals. Coronal parts were incrementally restored with resin-composite (Clearfil Majesty Posterior A2, Kuraray, Osaka, Japan). Prepared samples were subjected to chewing cycles in a chewing simulator (Chewing Simulator CS-4, Mechatronik, Germany). Flexural strengths of all groups were measured with three-point bending test. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). After MA, flexural strengths of all posts were significantly decreased when compared with BL for all FRPs tested (p < 0.05). At BL, highest flexural strength values were obtained for ICE. After MA, similar to BL, highest flexural strength values were obtained for ICE. Only RX showed statistically significant difference when compared with ICE (p < 0.05). UC and FP showed similar flexural strength values with ICE (p > 0.05). It may be concluded that chewing forces on post-core systems may reduce the flexural strengths of FRPs.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmbbm.2017.09.001DOI Listing
January 2018

Surface characteristics of bioactive Ti fabricated by chemical treatment for cartilaginous-integration.

Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl 2017 Sep 29;78:495-502. Epub 2017 Mar 29.

Department of Preventive and Restorative Sciences, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, 240 South 40th Street, Philadelphia, PA, United States. Electronic address:

Artificial hip joints are generally expected to fail due to wear after approximately 15years and then have to be replaced by revision surgery. If articular cartilage can be integrated onto the articular surfaces of artificial joints in the same way as osseo-integration of titanium dental implants, the wear of joint implants may be reduced or prevented. However, very few studies have focused on the relationship between Ti surface and cartilage. To explore the possibility of cartilaginous-integration, we fabricated chemically treated Ti surfaces with HO/HCl, collagen type II and SBF, respectively. Then, we evaluated surface characteristics of the prepared Ti samples and assessed the cartilage formation by culturing chondrocytes on the Ti samples. When oxidized Ti was immersed in SBF for 7days, apatite was formed on the Ti surface. The surface characteristics of Ti indicated that the wettability was increased by all chemical treatments compared to untreated Ti, and that HO/HCl treated surface had significantly higher roughness compared to the other three groups. Chondrocytes produced significantly more cartilage matrix on all chemically treated Ti surfaces compared to untreated Ti. Thus, to realize cartilaginous-integration and to prevent wear of the implants in joints, application of bioactive Ti formed by chemical treatment would be a promising and effective strategy to improve durability of joint replacement.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.msec.2017.03.250DOI Listing
September 2017

Local Tissue Electrical Resistances in Transpedicular Screw Application in the Thoracolumbar Region.

Turk Neurosurg 2016 ;26(6):937-943

Dicle University, School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Diyarbakır, Turkey.

Aim: To determine local tissue electrical resistance differences generated during a screw pass from the pedicle to another tissue rather than determining all individual electrical tissue resistance values.

Material And Methods: We attempted to measure electrical resistance values of regional tissues in addition to fluoroscopic imaging during application of fixation via a transpedicular screw. We also attempted to detect local tissue electrical resistance alterations in case of malposition of the screw inside the pedicle. For this purpose, local tissue electrical resistances of 10 transpedicular tracks opened with standard track openers bilaterally in 5 vertebrae, and of spinal cord accessed by puncturing the medial walls of three vertebrae in a cadaver were measured. These resistance differences were not only measured in human cadaveric tissue but also in 36 pedicles belonging to a total of 18 vertebrae between Th 1-S1 vertebrae of a sheep cadaver. Both medial and lateral walls were drilled to measure local tissue resistance differences in a sheep cadaver.

Results: Our results indicated that local tissue electrical resistance changes were statistically significant in both human and sheep cadaver.

Conclusion: It is possible to prevent screw malposition using a simple and cheap electrical resistance measurement. Local tissue electrical resistance measurement during transpedicular screw insertion is a safe, simple, cheap, and practical method.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5137/1019-5149.JTN.14185-15.0DOI Listing
April 2017

Effect of fluoride varnish with added casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate on the acid resistance of the primary enamel.

BMC Oral Health 2016 Sep 26;16(1):103. Epub 2016 Sep 26.

Department of Preventive and Restorative Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA.

Background: This study aimed to investigate the effects of a fluoride varnish with added Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate (CPP-ACP) treatments on acid resistance of primary teeth enamel.

Methods: Enamel specimens obtained from 40 primary incisors (for surface microhardness testing) and 40 primary molars (for demineralization depth measurement) were randomly divided into four groups (n = 10 incisors and 10 molars) each according to surface treatment: no treatment (control), MI varnish (1-8 % sodium fluoride and 1-5 % CPP-ACP), Clinpro White (1-5 % sodium fluoride and <5 % modified tricalcium phosphate), Duraphat (<5 % sodium fluoride). Specimens were stored for 24 h in a moist environment. After varnish residues were removed, specimens were subjected to pH cycling. The effects of fluoride varnishes were evaluated according to surface microhardness, lesion depth and structural changes. Results were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's tests.

Results: The lowest changes in surface microhardness and lesion depth occurred in MI varnish group, followed by the Clinpro White, Duraphat and no treatment (control) group (for percentage of loss surface microhardness -20.80, -34.60, -57.80 and -73.40; for lesion depth values 23.60 μm ± 3.36, 29.85 μm ± 3.27, 40.37 μm ± 3.41 and 54.56 μm ± 4.16, respectively). Statistically significant differences in both surface microhardness and lesion depth were observed among all groups (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, fluoride varnish containing CPP-ACP was more effective in increasing the acid resistance of primary enamel than other fluoride varnishes. However, further clinical research is needed to confirm these in vitro results.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12903-016-0299-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5036284PMC
September 2016

The Demographic Development of the First Farmers in Anatolia.

Curr Biol 2016 10 4;26(19):2659-2666. Epub 2016 Aug 4.

Department of Organismal Biology, Uppsala University, Norbyvägen 18C, 75236, Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address:

The archaeological documentation of the development of sedentary farming societies in Anatolia is not yet mirrored by a genetic understanding of the human populations involved, in contrast to the spread of farming in Europe [1-3]. Sedentary farming communities emerged in parts of the Fertile Crescent during the tenth millennium and early ninth millennium calibrated (cal) BC and had appeared in central Anatolia by 8300 cal BC [4]. Farming spread into west Anatolia by the early seventh millennium cal BC and quasi-synchronously into Europe, although the timing and process of this movement remain unclear. Using genome sequence data that we generated from nine central Anatolian Neolithic individuals, we studied the transition period from early Aceramic (Pre-Pottery) to the later Pottery Neolithic, when farming expanded west of the Fertile Crescent. We find that genetic diversity in the earliest farmers was conspicuously low, on a par with European foraging groups. With the advent of the Pottery Neolithic, genetic variation within societies reached levels later found in early European farmers. Our results confirm that the earliest Neolithic central Anatolians belonged to the same gene pool as the first Neolithic migrants spreading into Europe. Further, genetic affinities between later Anatolian farmers and fourth to third millennium BC Chalcolithic south Europeans suggest an additional wave of Anatolian migrants, after the initial Neolithic spread but before the Yamnaya-related migrations. We propose that the earliest farming societies demographically resembled foragers and that only after regional gene flow and rising heterogeneity did the farming population expansions into Europe occur.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2016.07.057DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5069350PMC
October 2016

Erratum to: Effect of resin infiltration on enamel surface properties and Streptococcus mutans adhesion to artificial enamel lesions.

Dent Mater J 2016 ;35(2):333

Unlabelled: Authors would like to add ACKNOWLEGMENT in this article, page 30, between CONCLUSION and REFERENCES as below.

Acknowlegment: This research was supported by Erciyes University Scientific Research Project Department.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4012/dmj.2014-078-eDOI Listing
August 2016

Effect of Storage Temperature on the Shelf Life of Self-adhesive Resin Cements.

J Adhes Dent 2015 Dec;17(6):545-50

Purpose: To compare the bonding performance of three new self-adhesive resin cements to human dentin after storage under two different conditions.

Materials And Methods: Buccal, lingual, mesial, and distal dentin surfaces of 36 human molars were abraded to directly below the enamel with #600 SiC papers. The teeth were divided into two main test groups. In the first test group (FT), the cements were kept in a refrigerator (6 ± 2°C) for three months and then used for the test. The remainder of the cements was kept at a constant room temperature of 19 ± 2°C for an additional three months, and then used again for the second test group (ST). Each test group comprised 6 teeth and 24 dentin sections. The cements Clearfil SA (CSA), G-Cem (GC), and Bis-Cem (BC) were applied to the surfaces according to the manufacturers' recommendations. After application of the cements to the flat dentin surfaces and light curing, shear bond strengths were determined at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Bond strengths were then calculated and expressed in MPa. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests. To investigate the cement/ dentin interfaces using SEM, the buccal surfaces of three additional teeth were used for each test group.

Results: The bond strength values of cement groups were significantly different for the FT and ST groups (p < 0.01). GC showed the highest bond strength values of all materials. There was a difference between the bond strength values of the two testing periods for all materials (p < 0.01). Bond strengths significantly decreased after storage at room temperature.

Conclusion: Storage temperatures considerably affect the shelf life of self-adhesive resin cements.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3290/j.jad.a35252DOI Listing
December 2015

The effect of zirconia thickness on the biaxial flexural strength of zirconiaceramic bilayered discs.

Dent Mater J 2015 ;34(5):640-7

Department of Dental Prosthetics Technology, Vocational School of Health Services, Marmara University.

The aim of this study was to assess the effect of zirconia core thickness on the biaxial flexural strength values of zirconia-porcelain bilayered discs. A total of 60 discs with 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5 mm thickness were obtained from a fully sintered zirconia block. A 1.5-mm thick layer of veneer porcelain was fired on the zirconia specimens and biaxial flexural strength tests were performed on the bilayered discs. In each group, the loading surface was the veneer porcelain in half of the specimens (core in tension) and the zirconia core surface in the other half (core in compression). The zirconia core thickness had no effect on the biaxial flexural strength of zirconiaporcelain bilayered discs when the core was in tension (p>0.05). Whereas, when the core was in compression, an increase in the zirconia core thickness resulted in an increase in the biaxial flexural strength (p<0.05).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4012/dmj.2014-340DOI Listing
January 2017

Effect of resin infiltration on enamel surface properties and Streptococcus mutans adhesion to artificial enamel lesions.

Dent Mater J 2015 17;34(1):25-30. Epub 2015 Jan 17.

Department of Restorative Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Erciyes.

The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effects of resin infiltration and sealant type on enamel surface properties and Streptococcus mutans adhesion to artificial enamel lesions. Artificial enamel lesions were produced on the surfaces of 120 enamel specimens, which were divided into two groups: Group A and Group B (n=60 per group). Each group was further divided into four subgroups (n=15 per subgroup) according to sealant type: Group I-Demineralized enamel (control); Group II-Enamel Pro Varnish; Group III-ExciTE F; and Group IV-Icon. In Group A, hardness and surface roughness were evaluated; in Group B, bacterial adhesion was evaluated. Icon application resulted in significantly lower surface roughness and higher hardness than the other subgroups in Group A. In Group B, Enamel Pro Varnish resulted in lowest bacterial adhesion, followed by Icon. This study showed that resin infiltration of enamel lesions could arrest lesion progress.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4012/dmj.2014-078DOI Listing
December 2016