Publications by authors named "Frederic Collet"

13 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Five-Year Clinical Outcome and Valve Durability After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in High-Risk Patients.

Circulation 2018 12;138(23):2597-2607

Department of Cardiology, Brest University Hospital, France (R.D., M.G.).

Background: The FRANCE-2 registry (French Aortic National Corevalve and Edwards) previously reported good early- and medium-term clinical and echocardiographic efficacy for transcatheter aortic valve replacement. We here report 5-year follow-up results from the registry.

Methods: The registry includes all consecutive patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis in France. Follow-up is scheduled at 30 days, 6 months, then annually from 1 to 5 years. Clinical events were defined according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium criteria, and hemodynamic structural valve deterioration (SVD) was defined according to the consensus statement by the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions.

Results: Between January 2010 and January 2012, 4201 patients were enrolled in 34 centers. Five-year vital status was available for 95.5% of patients; 88.1% had clinical evaluation or died. Overall, at 5 years, all-cause mortality was 60.8% (n=2478; 95% CI, 59.3% to 62.3%). The majority of cardiovascular events occurred in the first month after valve implantation, and incidence remained low thereafter, at <2% per year up to 5 years, except for heart failure. The rate of heart failure was 14.3% at 1 year, then decreased over time to <5% per year. In cumulative incidence function, the rates of severe SVD and moderate/severe SVD at 5 years were 2.5% and 13.3%, respectively. Mortality did not differ between patients with or without severe SVD (hazard ratio, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.47-1.07; P=0.1). Finally, in the population of patients with severe SVD, 1 patient (1.7%) experienced a stroke, and 8 patients presented ≥1 heart failure event (13.3%).

Conclusions: The 5-year follow-up results of the FRANCE-2 registry represent the largest long-term data set available in a high-risk population. In surviving patients, the low rate of clinical events and the low level of SVD after 1 year support the long-term efficacy of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in both types of transcatheter prosthesis featuring in the registry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.118.036866DOI Listing
December 2018

Multimodality imaging guidance for percutaneous paravalvular leak closure: Insights from the multi-centre FFPP register.

Arch Cardiovasc Dis 2018 Jun - Jul;111(6-7):421-431. Epub 2018 Jun 22.

Faculté de médecine Paris-Sud, hôpital Marie-Lannelongue, université Paris-Sud, Paris-Saclay, 92350 Le Plessis-Robinson, France.

Background: Percutaneous paravalvular leak (PVL) closure has emerged as a palliative alternative to surgical management in selected high-risk patients. Percutaneous procedures are challenging, especially for mitral PVL. Accurate imaging of the morphologies of the defects is mandatory, together with precise guidance in the catheterization laboratory to enhance success rates.

Aims: To describe imaging modalities used in clinical practice to guide percutaneous PVL closure and assess the potential of new imaging tools.

Methods: Data from the 'Fermeture de Fuite paraprothétique' (FFPP) register were used. The FFPP register is an international multi-institutional collaborative register started in 2017 with a retrospective and a prospective part. A descriptive analysis of multimodality imaging used to guide PVL closure in clinical practice was performed.

Results: Data from 173 procedures performed in 19 centres from three countries (France, Belgium and Poland) were collected, which included eight cases of PVL following transcatheter valve replacement. Transoesophageal echocardiography was used in 167 cases (96.5%) and 3D echocardiography in 87.4% of cases. In one case, 3D-echocardiography was fused with fluoroscopy images in real time using echonavigator software. Details about multimodality imaging were available from a sample of 31 patients. Cardiac computed tomography (CT) was performed before 10 of the procedures. In one case, fusion between preprocedural cardiac CT angiography data and fluoroscopy data was used. In two cases, a 3D model of the valve with PVL was printed.

Conclusion: Echocardiography, particularly the 3D mode, is the cornerstone of PVL imaging. Other imaging modalities, such as cardiac CT and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, may be of complementary interest. New techniques such as imaging fusion and printing may further facilitate the percutaneous approach of PVLs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acvd.2018.05.001DOI Listing
October 2018

Temporal Trends in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in France: FRANCE 2 to FRANCE TAVI.

J Am Coll Cardiol 2017 Jul;70(1):42-55

Cardiology and Vascular Diseases Service, Pontchaillou University Hospital Center, Center for Clinical Investigation 804, University of Rennes 1, Signal and Image Treatment Laboratory (LTSI), National Institute of Health and Medical Research U1099, Rennes, France. Electronic address:

Background: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is standard therapy for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at high surgical risk. However, national data regarding procedural characteristics and clinical outcomes over time are limited.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess nationwide performance trends and clinical outcomes of TAVR during a 6-year period.

Methods: TAVRs performed in 48 centers across France between January 2013 and December 2015 were prospectively included in the FRANCE TAVI (French Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation) registry. Findings were further compared with those reported from the FRANCE 2 (French Aortic National CoreValve and Edwards 2) registry, which captured all TAVRs performed from January 2010 to January 2012 across 34 centers.

Results: A total of 12,804 patients from FRANCE TAVI and 4,165 patients from FRANCE 2 were included in this analysis. The median age of patients was 84.6 years, and 49.7% were men. FRANCE TAVI participants were older but at lower surgical risk (median logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation [EuroSCORE]: 15.0% vs. 18.4%; p < 0.001). More than 80% of patients in FRANCE TAVI underwent transfemoral TAVR. Transesophageal echocardiography guidance decreased from 60.7% to 32.3% of cases, whereas more recent procedures were increasingly performed in hybrid operating rooms (15.8% vs. 35.7%). Rates of Valve Academic Research Consortium-defined device success increased from 95.3% in FRANCE 2 to 96.8% in FRANCE TAVI (p < 0.001). In-hospital and 30-day mortality rates were 4.4% and 5.4%, respectively, in FRANCE TAVI compared with 8.2% and 10.1%, respectively, in FRANCE 2 (p < 0.001 for both). Stroke and potentially life-threatening complications, such as annulus rupture or aortic dissection, remained stable over time, whereas rates of cardiac tamponade and pacemaker implantation significantly increased.

Conclusions: The FRANCE TAVI registry provided reassuring data regarding trends in TAVR performance in an all-comers population on a national scale. Nonetheless, given that TAVR indications are likely to expand to patients at lower surgical risk, concerns remain regarding potentially life-threatening complications and pacemaker implantation. (Registry of Aortic Valve Bioprostheses Established by Catheter [FRANCE TAVI]; NCT01777828).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2017.04.053DOI Listing
July 2017

Late Outcomes of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in High-Risk Patients: The FRANCE-2 Registry.

J Am Coll Cardiol 2016 10;68(15):1637-1647

Department of Cardiology, Bichat University Hospital, Paris, France.

Background: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has revolutionized management of high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. However, survival and the incidence of severe complications have been assessed in relatively small populations and/or with limited follow-up.

Objectives: This report details late clinical outcome and its determinants in the FRANCE-2 (FRench Aortic National CoreValve and Edwards) registry.

Methods: The FRANCE-2 registry prospectively included all TAVRs performed in France. Follow-up was scheduled at 30 days, at 6 months, and annually from 1 to 5 years. Standardized VARC (Valve Academic Research Consortium) outcome definitions were used.

Results: A total of 4,201 patients were enrolled between January 2010 and January 2012 in 34 centers. Approaches were transarterial (transfemoral 73%, transapical 18%, subclavian 6%, and transaortic or transcarotid 3%) or, in 18% of patients, transapical. Median follow-up was 3.8 years. Vital status was available for 97.2% of patients at 3 years. The 3-year all-cause mortality was 42.0% and cardiovascular mortality was 17.5%. In a multivariate model, predictors of 3-year all-cause mortality were male sex (p < 0.001), low body mass index, (p < 0.001), atrial fibrillation (p < 0.001), dialysis (p < 0.001), New York Heart Association functional class III or IV (p < 0.001), higher logistic EuroSCORE (p < 0.001), transapical or subclavian approach (p < 0.001 for both vs. transfemoral approach), need for permanent pacemaker implantation (p = 0.02), and post-implant periprosthetic aortic regurgitation grade ≥2 of 4 (p < 0.001). Severe events according to VARC criteria occurred mainly during the first month and subsequently in <2% of patients/year. Mean gradient, valve area, and residual aortic regurgitation were stable during follow-up.

Conclusions: The FRANCE-2 registry represents the largest database available on late results of TAVR. Late mortality is largely related to noncardiac causes. Incidence rates of severe events are low after the first month. Valve performance remains stable over time.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2016.07.747DOI Listing
October 2016

Registry of transcatheter aortic-valve implantation in high-risk patients.

N Engl J Med 2012 May;366(18):1705-15

Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Brest, Brest, France.

Background: Transcatheter aortic-valve implantation (TAVI) is an emerging intervention for the treatment of high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis and coexisting illnesses. We report the results of a prospective multicenter study of the French national transcatheter aortic-valve implantation registry, FRANCE 2.

Methods: All TAVIs performed in France, as listed in the FRANCE 2 registry, were prospectively included in the study. The primary end point was death from any cause.

Results: A total of 3195 patients were enrolled between January 2010 and October 2011 at 34 centers. The mean (±SD) age was 82.7±7.2 years; 49% of the patients were women. All patients were highly symptomatic and were at high surgical risk for aortic-valve replacement. Edwards SAPIEN and Medtronic CoreValve devices were implanted in 66.9% and 33.1% of patients, respectively. Approaches were either transarterial (transfemoral, 74.6%; subclavian, 5.8%; and other, 1.8%) or transapical (17.8%). The procedural success rate was 96.9%. Rates of death at 30 days and 1 year were 9.7% and 24.0%, respectively. At 1 year, the incidence of stroke was 4.1%, and the incidence of periprosthetic aortic regurgitation was 64.5%. In a multivariate model, a higher logistic risk score on the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE), New York Heart Association functional class III or IV symptoms, the use of a transapical TAVI approach, and a higher amount of periprosthetic regurgitation were significantly associated with reduced survival.

Conclusions: This prospective registry study reflected real-life TAVI experience in high-risk elderly patients with aortic stenosis, in whom TAVI appeared to be a reasonable option. (Funded by Edwards Lifesciences and Medtronic.).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1114705DOI Listing
May 2012

Transcutaneous aortic valve implantation using the left carotid access: feasibility and early clinical outcomes.

Ann Thorac Surg 2012 May 28;93(5):1489-94. Epub 2012 Mar 28.

Heart Team, Lille University Hospital, Lille, France.

Background: In some patients, transfemoral, transaxillary, or transapical aortic valve implantation is not possible. Thus, carotid artery access may represent a safe alternative to those accesses, and even offers certain advantages. In this article, we describe aortic valve implantation using the left carotid arterial approach and report our initial experience.

Methods: Using a self-expandable nitinol based device (CoreValve ReValving system, Medtronic Ltd, Luxembourg), we exposed the left carotid artery through a small incision. Arterial puncture and initial 6F sheath introduction were achieved through a contraincision. The same implantation technique as for transaxillary implantation was used. Progressive artery dilatation was achieved using sheaths of increasing diameter. Rapid ventricular pacing was used to reduce cardiac output while performing a routine aortic balloon valvuloplasty. Only then, an 18F sheath was inserted into the carotid artery and pushed down into the ascending aorta. The patients were monitored using cerebral oxymetry to assess cerebral perfusion.

Results: Twelve consecutive patients, at high surgical risk, were implanted and studied prospectively. Transfemoral and subclavian catheterization were considered unfeasible or at risk of severe complications. Carotid arterial injury did not occur in any patient. A transient ischemic attack occurred in 1 patient, contralateral to the carotid access. There were no deaths in either intraprocedural or during the 30-day follow-up period.

Conclusions: This initial experience suggests that left carotid transarterial aortic valve implantation, in selected high-risk patients, is feasible and safe with satisfactory short-term outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2012.01.030DOI Listing
May 2012

French Ministry of Health prospective multicentre study using bio-active stents coated with titanium nitride oxide: the EVIDENCE registry.

Arch Cardiovasc Dis 2012 Feb 19;105(2):60-7. Epub 2012 Feb 19.

Hôpital de Brabois, Vandoeuvre, France.

Background: Coronary stents have evolved over time, from bare-metal stents to drug-eluting stents, and now to bioactive stents.

Aims: We sought to explore the immediate outcome of the titanium-nitride-oxide-coated bioactive stent, Titan2(®), in real-world practice, and the incidence of major cardiac events at follow-up.

Methods: Consecutive patients admitted for percutaneous intervention for at least one significant (≥50%) lesion in a native coronary artery were treated with Titan2(®) stent implantation. The primary endpoint was total major adverse cardiac events at 12-month follow-up. Secondary endpoints included target lesion revascularization at 12-month follow-up and the duration of dual antiplatelet therapy.

Results: Among 356 patients (mean age 67.4 ± 12.1 years), 77.2% were male and 39.3% were treated for myocardial infarction (MI). A total of 546 Titan2(®) stents were implanted in 420 lesions. Angiographic and clinical procedural success was achieved in all cases. No cases of in-hospital major adverse cardiac events or acute stent thrombosis were reported. Of 335 patients (94.1%) with 12-month clinical follow-up, four (1.2%) died, MI occurred in five (1.5%), target lesion revascularization was performed in 17 (5.1%) and major adverse cardiac events occurred in 24 (7.2%). One patient (0.3%) suffered late stent thrombosis during follow-up, but no cases of acute or subacute stent thrombosis occurred. Dual antiplatelet therapy continued beyond 6 months in 64.5% of patients.

Conclusions: In real-world practice, Titan2(®) stent implantation achieves an excellent immediate outcome, with a low incidence of major adverse cardiac events at 12-month follow-up.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acvd.2011.12.003DOI Listing
February 2012

Transcutaneous aortic valve implantation using the axillary/subclavian access with patent left internal thoracic artery to left anterior descending artery: feasibility and early clinical outcomes.

J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2012 Dec 11;144(6):1416-20. Epub 2012 Feb 11.

CHRU de Lille, Marseille, France.

Objective: Both retrograde femoral and subclavian artery catheterization techniques have been described as the most common methods for the implantation of the Medtronic CoreValve percutaneous aortic valve (Medtronic Inc, Minneapolis, Minn). The subclavian artery has been shown to be a safe and effective alternative access route in patients with unfavorable femoral access. Of the patients who are identified as candidates for subclavian artery access, a subset possess a patent left internal thoracic artery to left anterior descending artery. This patent left internal thoracic artery presents an additional anatomic and clinical variable that must be taken into consideration to ensure procedural safety and efficacy. We describe the Medtronic CoreValve percutaneous aortic valve implantation using the subclavian arterial approach in patients with a patent left internal thoracic artery and report our study's findings.

Methods: The CoreValve percutaneous aortic valve is a self-expandable nitinol-based frame with a porcine pericardial valve. The subclavian access was created by a small infraclavicular surgical incision to expose the artery. Rapid ventricular pacing was used to reduce cardiac output to perform the balloon aortic valvuloplasty via a 12F sheath inserted into the subclavian artery. An 18F sheath was then inserted into the artery down into the ascending aorta and used for introduction of the delivery catheter and implantation of the percutaneous aortic valve.

Results: With the use of this method, 19 patients (76 ± 13 years) whose surgical risk was deemed excessive because of severe comorbidity and in whom transfemoral catheterization was considered unfeasible or at risk of severe complications have received implants. Subclavian artery or left internal thoracic artery injury did not occur in any patient. Two deaths occurred. One patient died of right coronary artery occlusion during the procedure, and one patient died 48 hours after the procedure as the result of a tamponade after the temporary pacemaker wire ablation.

Conclusions: This initial experience suggests that subclavian transarterial aortic valve implantation in patients with a patent left internal thoracic artery to left anterior descending artery is feasible and safe with satisfactory short-term outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtcvs.2012.01.031DOI Listing
December 2012

Rate of nuisance bleedings and impact on compliance to prasugrel in acute coronary syndromes.

Am J Cardiol 2011 Dec 8;108(12):1710-3. Epub 2011 Sep 8.

Département de Cardiologie, Hôpital Universitaire Nord, Faculté De Médecine, Université de la Méditerranée, Marseille, France.

Antiplatelet agents are critical to prevent thrombotic events in patients with acute coronary syndromes, particularly those who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention. Prasugrel is a potent P2Y(12)-adenosine diphosphate receptor antagonist that is superior to clopidogrel in such patients. Previous studies have observed that nuisance and internal bleedings were relatively frequent in patients under clopidogrel therapy and were associated with noncompliance. Furthermore, premature drug discontinuation is associated with thrombotic recurrences. The aim of the present study was to investigate the rate of nuisance or internal bleedings in patients receiving prasugrel and its relation with compliance. This prospective multicenter study included 396 patients. Bleeding events were recorded and classified as alarming, nuisance, or internal according. Compliance with prasugrel therapy was assessed. Almost half of the patients (48.5%) were included for ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes. During the 1-month follow-up period, 54 patients (13.6%) had bleeding events. Most bleeding events were classified as internal or nuisance (96%). Internal and nuisance bleedings were associated with high rates of prasugrel discontinuation (16.6% and 14.7%, respectively). Nuisance and internal bleedings were significantly associated with prasugrel discontinuation in multivariate analysis (odds ratio 3.1, 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 9.2, p = 0.04). The rate of major adverse cardiovascular events was 2.3%. No relation was observed between minor bleeds, compliance, and major adverse cardiovascular events. In conclusion, in the present study, minor bleedings were common during the first month after percutaneous coronary intervention and were significantly associated with prasugrel withdrawal.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2011.07.038DOI Listing
December 2011

High on-treatment platelet reactivity after prasugrel loading dose and cardiovascular events after percutaneous coronary intervention in acute coronary syndromes.

J Am Coll Cardiol 2011 Jul;58(5):467-73

Département de Cardiologie, Hôpital Universitaire Nord, Faculté de Médecine, Chemin des Bourrely, Marseille, France.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between platelet reactivity (PR) after a loading dose (LD) of prasugrel and thrombotic events.

Background: Post-treatment PR has been shown to be strongly associated with the occurrence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the clopidogrel era. Prasugrel is a new P2Y(12)-adenosine diphosphate receptor with a higher potency on PR.

Methods: A prospective multicenter study included patients who underwent successful PCI for acute coronary syndromes and received prasugrel therapy. Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) index was measured after the prasugrel LD. High on-treatment PR was defined as a VASP index ≥50%. MACE included cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, and definite stent thrombosis at 1 month.

Results: Three hundred one patients were enrolled. The mean VASP index after 60 mg of prasugrel was 34.3 ± 23.1%. High on-treatment PR was observed in 76 patients (25.2%). Patients experiencing thrombotic events after PCI had significantly higher VASP indexes compared with those free of events (64.4 ± 14.4% vs. 33.4 ± 22.7%; range: 51% to 64% and 5% to 47.6%, respectively; p = 0.001). Kaplan-Meier analysis comparing good responders and patients with high on-treatment PR demonstrated a significantly higher rate of MACE in patients with suboptimal PR inhibition (log-rank p < 0.001). Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis found a cutoff value of 53.5% of the VASP index to predict thrombotic events at 1 month (r = 0.86, p < 0.001). Patients with minor or major Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction unrelated to coronary artery bypass grafting bleeding and those without had similar VASP indexes (30 ± 17.8% vs. 34.3 ± 23%, p = 0.70).

Conclusions: Despite the use of prasugrel, a significant number of patients undergoing PCI in the setting of acute coronary syndromes do not achieve optimal PR inhibition. Such patients have a higher risk for MACE after PCI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2011.04.017DOI Listing
July 2011

Tailored clopidogrel loading dose according to platelet reactivity monitoring to prevent acute and subacute stent thrombosis.

Am J Cardiol 2009 Jan 13;103(1):5-10. Epub 2008 Nov 13.

Département de cardiologie, Hôpital universitaire nord, Faculté de médecine, France.

Stent thrombosis remains a significant pitfall of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). A recent trial observed that an adjusted loading dose (LD) of clopidogrel according to platelet monitoring decreases the rate of major adverse cardiovascular events after PCI. We investigated if such a strategy of a tailored clopidogrel LD according to platelet reactivity monitoring could decrease the rate of stent thrombosis. This multicenter prospective randomized study included 429 patients with a low clopidogrel response after a 600-mg LD undergoing PCI. Patients were randomized to a control group (n = 214) and to a vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP)-guided group (n = 215). In the VASP-guided group, patients received up to 3 additional 600-mg LDs of clopidogrel to obtain a VASP index <50% before PCI. The primary end point was the rate of stent thrombosis at 1 month. Secondary end points were rates of major adverse cardiovascular events and bleeding. Patients in the 2 groups had a high body mass index and were often diabetic (control vs VASP-guided group 28 +/- 5.1 vs 27.9 +/- 4.7 kg/m(2), p = 0.8, and 39% vs 33%, p = 0.2, respectively). PCI was performed in most patients for acute coronary syndrome in the 2 groups (52.3% vs 50.7%, p = 0.8). Despite a 2,400-mg LD of clopidogrel, 8% of patients in the VASP-guided group remained low responders. The rate of stent thrombosis was significantly lower in the VASP-guided group (0.5% vs 4.2%, p <0.01). The rate of major adverse cardiovascular events was also higher in the control group (8.9% vs 0.5%, p <0.001). There was no difference in the rate of bleeding (2.8% vs 3.7%, p = 0.8). In conclusion, a tailored clopidogrel LD according to platelet reactivity monitoring decreases the rate of early stent thrombosis after PCI without increasing bleeding.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2008.08.048DOI Listing
January 2009

A prospective population-based study of 598 cases of PPROM between 24 and 34 weeks' gestation: description, management, and mortality (DOMINOS cohort).

Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 2005 Aug;121(2):164-70

Department of Obstetrics, Edouard Herriot Hospital and Claude Bernard University, 5 place d'Arsonval, 69437 Lyon Cedex 03, France.

Objective(s): Description of mothers' characteristics, obstetricians' practices, and PPROM-linked mortality in all 81 maternity hospitals in the Rhône-Alpes Region, over a period of 2 years.

Study Design: Prospective cohort study of 598 women with PPROM between 24 and 34 weeks' gestation, leading to 680 births. At time of PPROM, collection of mothers' socio-economic characteristics, medical and obstetric histories and PPROM circumstances. Collection of perinatal management, neonates' medical status and postnatal referral.

Results: The birth rate after PPROM between 24 and 34 weeks' gestation was 0.47% (95% CI: 0.42-0.48). Sixty percent of PPROM occurred before 32 weeks' gestation and 98% of births before 37 weeks. The incidence of previous PPROM was 14.3%. Antibiotics, corticosteroids, and tocolytics were given to 82, 78, and 52% of women, respectively. The rate of antibiotics and antenatal corticosteroids varied with gestational age (lower rates for antibiotics just after the limit of viability (23-24 weeks) and after 32 weeks, higher rates of corticosteroids between 26 and 30 weeks). The PPROM-birth interval became shorter as gestation advanced. The incidence of C-section was 58.7% (n = 270), C-section before labour being the most frequent mode of delivery. Sixty-seven percent of neonates were born in Level-3 hospitals. The overall neonatal mortality rate at 28 days decreased with gestational age at PPROM, and was 17.2% (16/93), 3% (6/200), and 0.41% (1/241) at 24-27, 28-31 and 32-33 weeks of PPROM, respectively.

Conclusion(s): After PPROM, antibiotics and antenatal corticosteroids were widely used in our cohort, and C-section rates were elevated. With that up-to-date management, the perinatal mortality rate was less than 3% following PPROM after 28 weeks' gestation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejogrb.2004.12.015DOI Listing
August 2005