Mr Frantzy Acluche, BA, Msc - Eastern Michigan University PhD in Clinical Psychology   - PhD Doctoral Candidate

Mr Frantzy Acluche

BA, Msc

Eastern Michigan University PhD in Clinical Psychology

PhD Doctoral Candidate

Ypsilanti, Michigan | United States

Main Specialties: Biology

Additional Specialties: Adobe Illustrator, Microsoft Suite (Excel, Word, PowerPoint, Publisher), SPSS, SPSS Syntax, EEG, Biosemi System, Matlab, BESA, REDCap, Thermaltake Eyelink system and device, Presentation, Eprime, R-Studio, EEGlab; NVIVO qualitative Data analysis software, OLUMPUS AS-2400 transcription software; VA


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Mr Frantzy Acluche, BA, Msc - Eastern Michigan University PhD in Clinical Psychology   - PhD Doctoral Candidate

Mr Frantzy Acluche

BA, Msc

Education

Aug 2014
Edinburgh UNiversity
Msc in Human Cognitive Neuropsychology
Jun 2012
The City College of New York
BA in Psychology

Experience

Jul 2013
Electroencephalography
Research Technician

Publications

12Publications

158Reads

198Profile Views

9PubMed Central Citations

User experience of controlling the DEKA Arm with EMG pattern recognition.

PLoS One 2018 21;13(9):e0203987. Epub 2018 Sep 21.

Research Department, Providence VA Medical Center, Providence, Rhode Island, United States of America.

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0203987PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6150511PMC
March 2019
2 Reads
1 Citation
3.234 Impact Factor

Function, quality of life, and community integration of DEKA Arm users after discharge from prosthetic training: Impact of home use experience.

Prosthet Orthot Int 2018 Dec 19;42(6):571-582. Epub 2018 May 19.

5 Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, VA NY Harbor Healthcare System and Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0309364618774054DOI Listing
December 2018
5 Reads
1.073 Impact Factor

Does the DEKA Arm substitute for or supplement conventional prostheses.

Prosthet Orthot Int 2018 Oct 14;42(5):534-543. Epub 2017 Sep 14.

Providence VA Medical Center, Providence, RI, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0309364617729924DOI Listing
October 2018
7 Reads
1 Citation
1.073 Impact Factor

EMG pattern recognition compared to foot control of the DEKA Arm.

PLoS One 2018 18;13(10):e0204854. Epub 2018 Oct 18.

NYU School of Medicine, New York, New York, United States of America.

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0204854PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6193636PMC
October 2018
17 Reads
3.234 Impact Factor

The DEKA hand: A multifunction prosthetic terminal device-patterns of grip usage at home.

Prosthet Orthot Int 2018 Aug 15;42(4):446-454. Epub 2017 Sep 15.

Providence VA Medical Center, Providence, RI, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0309364617728117DOI Listing
August 2018
6 Reads
1.073 Impact Factor

Timed activity performance in persons with upper limb amputation: A preliminary study.

J Hand Ther 2017 Oct - Dec;30(4):468-476. Epub 2017 May 6.

Providence VA Medical Center, Providence, RI, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jht.2017.03.008DOI Listing
July 2018
35 Reads
2 Citations
1.810 Impact Factor

How do the outcomes of the DEKA Arm compare to conventional prostheses?

Resnik, L. J., Borgia, M. L., Acluche, F., Cancio, J. M., Latlief, G., & Sasson, N. (2018). How do the outcomes of the DEKA Arm compare to conventional prostheses?. PloS one, 13(1), e0191326.

PloS one

Objectives Objectives were to 1) compare self-reported function, dexterity, activity performance, quality of life and community integration of the DEKA Arm to conventional prostheses; and 2) examine differences in outcomes by conventional prosthesis type, terminal device type and by DEKA Arm configuration level. Methods This was a two-part study; Part A consisted of in-laboratory training. Part B consisted of home use. Study participants were 23 prosthesis users (mean age = 45 ± 16; 87% male) who completed Part A, and 15 (mean age = 45 ± 18; 87% male) who completed Parts A and B. Outcomes including self-report and performance measures, were collected at Baseline using participants’ personal prostheses and at the End of Parts A and B. Scores were compared using paired t-tests. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to compare outcomes for the full sample, and for the sample stratified by device and terminal device type. Analysis of outcomes by configuration level was performed graphically. Results At the End of Part A activity performance using the DEKA Arm and conventional prosthesis was equivalent, but slower with the DEKA Arm. After Part B, performance using the DEKA Arm surpassed conventional prosthesis scores, and speed of activity completion was equivalent. Participants reported using the DEKA Arm to perform more activities, had less perceived disability, and less difficulty in activities at the End of A and B as compared to Baseline. No differences were observed in dexterity, prosthetic skill, spontaneity, pain, community integration or quality of life. Comparisons stratified by device type revealed similar patterns. Graphic comparisons revealed variations by configuration level. Conclusion Participants using the DEKA Arm had less perceived disability and more engagement of the prosthesis in everyday tasks, although activity performance was slower. After home use experience, activity performance was improved and activity speed equivalent to using conventional prostheses.

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July 2018
3 Reads

Function, quality of life, and community integration of DEKA Arm users after discharge from prosthetic training: Impact of home use experience

Resnik, L., Acluche, F., Borgia, M., Cancio, J., Latlief, G., & Sasson, N. (2018). Function, quality of life, and community integration of DEKA Arm users after discharge from prosthetic training: Impact of home use experience. Prosthetics and orthotics international, 0309364618774054.

Background: Research on adaptation to advanced upper limb prostheses is needed. Objectives: To (1) examine change in function, quality of life and community integration after prosthetic training, (2) determine whether change in outcomes varied by prosthesis complexity, and (3) compare patterns of change at 1 month for those who withdrew from the study and those who did not. Study design: Quasi-experimental time series. Methods: Data were analyzed for 22 participants (18 completers). Performance and self-report outcome measures were collected after in-laboratory training (Part A) and every 4 weeks of home use (Part B). Outcomes from End of A to End of B were compared statistically. Outcomes across assessments and by configuration level were compared graphically. Changes in scores were compared graphically for completers and non-completers. Results: Quality of life scores did not change between End of A and End of B, whereas scores improved for one activity measure, two measures of self-reported function, and three dexterity measures (p < 0.05). Outcomes of community integration, self-reported function, four dexterity measures, and one activity measure varied by prosthesis level. For participants who withdrew early, dexterity and activity scores worsened, perceived disability increased, and prosthesis satisfaction decreased after 4 weeks of home use. Conclusion: Study completers adapted to the DEKA Arm. Clinical relevance Findings suggest that for the majority of upper limb amputees discharged from prosthetic rehabilitation, function continues to improve with home use. However, a minority experience a decline in function, greater perceived disability, and greater dissatisfaction after 4 weeks, suggesting a need for continued therapy after intensive prosthetic training ends.

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May 2018
2 Reads

Brief activity performance measure for upper limb amputees: BAM-ULA.

Prosthet Orthot Int 2018 Feb 16;42(1):75-83. Epub 2017 Jan 16.

Providence VA Medical Center, Providence, RI, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0309364616684196DOI Listing
February 2018
50 Reads
2 Citations
1.073 Impact Factor

Perceptions of satisfaction, usability and desirability of the DEKA Arm before and after a trial of home use.

PLoS One 2017 2;12(6):e0178640. Epub 2017 Jun 2.

Research Department, Providence VA Medical Center, Providence, Rhode Island, United States of America.

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0178640PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5456350PMC
September 2017
12 Reads
3.234 Impact Factor

Appropriateness of advanced upper limb prosthesis prescription for a patient with cognitive impairment: a case report.

Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol 2017 08 19;12(6):647-656. Epub 2016 Jul 19.

a Providence VA Medical Center , Providence , RI , USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17483107.2016.1201155DOI Listing
August 2017
10 Reads
2 Citations

The neural dynamics of somatosensory processing and adaptation across childhood: a high-density electrical mapping study.

J Neurophysiol 2016 Mar 13;115(3):1605-19. Epub 2016 Jan 13.

The Sheryl and Daniel R. Tishman Cognitive Neurophysiology Laboratory, Children's Evaluation and Rehabilitation Center, Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York; The Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience, Rose F. Kennedy Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York;

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/jn.01059.2015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4808123PMC
March 2016
14 Reads
1 Citation
2.890 Impact Factor

Top co-authors

Linda Resnik
Linda Resnik

Providence VA Medical Center

6
Matthew Borgia
Matthew Borgia

Providence VA Medical Center

5
Linda J Resnik
Linda J Resnik

Center for Gerontology and Health Care Research

3
Nicole Sasson
Nicole Sasson

NYU School of Medicine

3
Jill Cancio
Jill Cancio

b Extremity Trauma and Amputation Center of Excellence (EACE)

2
Gail Latlief
Gail Latlief

James A Haley Veterans Hospital

2
Neha Uppal
Neha Uppal

Sri Guru Ram Das Institute of Medical Sciences and Research

1
John J Foxe
John J Foxe

The Sheryl and Daniel R. Tishman Cognitive Neurophysiology Laboratory

1
John S Butler
John S Butler

Trinity College Dublin

1