Publications by authors named "Frank Portillo"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Evolutionary history of burrowing asps (Lamprophiidae: Atractaspidinae) with emphasis on fang evolution and prey selection.

PLoS One 2019 17;14(4):e0214889. Epub 2019 Apr 17.

Department of Biological Sciences, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas, United States of America.

Atractaspidines are poorly studied, fossorial snakes that are found throughout Africa and western Asia, including the Middle East. We employed concatenated gene-tree analyses and divergence dating approaches to investigate evolutionary relationships and biogeographic patterns of atractaspidines with a multi-locus data set consisting of three mitochondrial (16S, cyt b, and ND4) and two nuclear genes (c-mos and RAG1). We sampled 91 individuals from both atractaspidine genera (Atractaspis and Homoroselaps). Additionally, we used ancestral-state reconstructions to investigate fang and diet evolution within Atractaspidinae and its sister lineage (Aparallactinae). Our results indicated that current classification of atractaspidines underestimates diversity within the group. Diversification occurred predominantly between the Miocene and Pliocene. Ancestral-state reconstructions suggest that snake dentition in these taxa might be highly plastic within relatively short periods of time to facilitate adaptations to dynamic foraging and life-history strategies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0214889PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6469773PMC
January 2020

Phylogeny and biogeography of the African burrowing snake subfamily Aparallactinae (Squamata: Lamprophiidae).

Mol Phylogenet Evol 2018 10 15;127:288-303. Epub 2018 Mar 15.

Department of Biological Sciences, University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Ave., El Paso, TX 79968, USA.

Members of the snake subfamily Aparallactinae occur in various habitats throughout sub-Saharan Africa. The monophyly of aparallactine snakes is well established, but relationships within the subfamily are poorly known. We sampled 158 individuals from six of eight aparallactine genera in sub-Saharan Africa. We employed concatenated gene-tree analyses, divergence dating approaches, and ancestral-area reconstructions to infer phylogenies and biogeographic patterns with a multi-locus data set consisting of three mitochondrial (16S, cyt b, and ND4) and two nuclear genes (c-mos and RAG1). As a result, we uncover several cryptic lineages and elevate a lineage of Polemon to full species status. Diversification occurred predominantly during the Miocene, with a few speciation events occurring subsequently in the Pliocene and Pleistocene. Biogeographic analyses suggested that the Zambezian biogeographic region, comprising grasslands and woodlands, facilitated radiations, vicariance, and dispersal for many aparallactines. Moreover, the geographic distributions of many forest species were fragmented during xeric and cooler conditions, which likely led to diversification events. Biogeographic patterns of aparallactine snakes are consistent with previous studies of other sub-Saharan herpetofauna.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2018.03.019DOI Listing
October 2018

Phylogeography and species boundaries of Leptopelis (Anura: Arthroleptidae) from the Albertine Rift.

Mol Phylogenet Evol 2015 Jan 5;82 Pt A:75-86. Epub 2014 Oct 5.

Institut für Integrierte Naturwissenschaften, Abteilung Biologie, AG Zoologie, Universität Koblenz-Landau, Universitätsstraße 1, 56070 Koblenz, Germany.

The genus Leptopelis occurs in multiple habitats throughout sub-Saharan Africa, and it includes several species that have highly variable color patterns, which makes taxonomic studies challenging. In this study, we examined multiple populations of Leptopelis from the Albertine Rift (AR), a region known for its high levels of endemism and biodiversity. Currently, five species are recognized from the AR: L. anebos, L. fiziensis, L. karissimbensis, L. kivuensis, and L. mtoewaate, most of which are found in and around the Itombwe Plateau in Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). We sampled 90 individuals of Leptopelis from multiple localities in DRC, Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi. We employed concatenated gene-tree analyses, coalescent species-tree analyses, and divergence dating approaches to infer phylogenies and biogeographic patterns with a multi-locus data set consisting of two mitochondrial (16S and cyt b) and one nuclear gene (RAG1). All analyses revealed several cryptic lineages within the genus, suggesting that a revision of AR Leptopelis taxonomy is needed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2014.09.024DOI Listing
January 2015

Systematics of the poorly known treefrog (Anura: Arthroleptidae), with a description of its call.

Afr J Herpetol 2012 18;61(2):113-127. Epub 2012 Sep 18.

Department of Biological Sciences, University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968, USA.

was described as a subspecies of from specimens that were collected in 1956 in the region in and around Fizi, in present-day Democratic Republic of the Congo. We recently discovered in transitional and montane forest near the type locality and the southeastern Itombwe Plateau, respectively. A phylogenetic analysis (16S mitochondrial sequence data) of these samples and other species recovered as sister to with strong support, and rejected a close relationship between and both topotypic from Cameroon and from Kenya. Herein, we provide a detailed description of the morphometrics, colour pattern, male advertisement call and natural history of this poorly known species. At least one literature record of from Tanzania has notable differences from our data, and requires further study to ascertain its taxonomic status.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21564574.2012.716083DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3583300PMC
September 2012
-->