Publications by authors named "Francisco J Fernández-Acero"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Infection Strategies Deployed by , , and as a Function of Tomato Fruit Ripening Stage.

Front Plant Sci 2019 1;10:223. Epub 2019 Mar 1.

Department of Plant Sciences, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, United States.

Worldwide, 20-25% of all harvested fruit and vegetables are lost annually in the field and throughout the postharvest supply chain due to rotting by fungal pathogens. Most postharvest pathogens exhibit necrotrophic or saprotrophic lifestyles, resulting in decomposition of the host tissues and loss of marketable commodities. Necrotrophic fungi can readily infect ripe fruit leading to the rapid establishment of disease symptoms. However, these pathogens generally fail to infect unripe fruit or remain quiescent until host conditions stimulate a successful infection. Previous research on infections of fruit has mainly been focused on the host's genetic and physicochemical factors that inhibit or promote disease. Here, we investigated if fruit pathogens can modify their own infection strategies in response to the ripening stage of the host. To test this hypothesis, we profiled global gene expression of three fungal pathogens that display necrotrophic behavior-, , and -during interactions with unripe and ripe tomato fruit. We assembled and functionally annotated the transcriptomes of and as no genomic resources were available. Then, we conducted differential gene expression analysis to compare each pathogen during inoculations versus conditions. Through characterizing patterns of overrepresented pathogenicity and virulence functions (e.g., phytotoxin production, cell wall degradation, and proteolysis) among the differentially expressed genes, we were able to determine shared strategies among the three fungi during infections of compatible (ripe) and incompatible (unripe) fruit tissues. Though each pathogen's strategy differed in the details, interactions with unripe fruit were commonly characterized by an emphasis on the degradation of cell wall components, particularly pectin, while colonization of ripe fruit featured more heavily redox processes, proteolysis, metabolism of simple sugars, and chitin biosynthesis. Furthermore, we determined that the three fungi were unable to infect fruit from the () tomato mutant, confirming that to cause disease, these pathogens require the host tissues to undergo specific ripening processes. By enabling a better understanding of fungal necrotrophic infection strategies, we move closer to generating accurate models of fruit diseases and the development of early detection tools and effective management strategies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2019.00223DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6405687PMC
March 2019

Phenotypic Effects and Inhibition of Botrydial Biosynthesis Induced by Different Plant-Based Elicitors in Botrytis cinerea.

Curr Microbiol 2018 Apr 17;75(4):431-440. Epub 2017 Nov 17.

Microbiology Laboratory, Andalusian Center for Grape and Grapevine Research, Faculty of Marine and Environmental Sciences, University of Cadiz, Polígono Rio San Pedro s/n, 11510, Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain.

Botrytis cinerea is considered a model organism for the study of plant-pathogen interaction showing great genetic diversity and a high degree of morphological variability depending on environmental conditions. The use of new compounds and plant-based elicitors may trigger the expression of different B. cinerea genes, providing new sources of virulence factors. This work is focused on elucidating the phenotypic effect in B. cinerea of different carbon sources such as glucose, cellulose and tomato cell walls (TCW). Production of botrydial and dihydrobotrydial toxins was evaluated using thin-layer chromatography (TLC), proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (H-NMR) and mass spectrometry (UPLC-HRESIMS). Expression of the toxin biosynthesis gene BcBOT2 was followed using RT-qPCR. Results show an inhibition of the toxin biosynthesis pathway when TCW are present as a sole carbon source, suggesting that the toxin is only produced when rich molecules, like glucose, are available for fungal metabolism. That suggests a connection between gene expression of virulence factors and environmental conditions, where the silent genes can be induced by different culture conditions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00284-017-1399-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5842495PMC
April 2018