Publications by authors named "Francisco Cuevas-Castillo"

3 Publications

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Current systematic reviews and meta-analyses of COVID-19.

World J Virol 2021 Jul;10(4):182-208

Department of Internal Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai/NYC H&H Queens, New York, NY 11432, United States.

Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has left a significant impact on the world's health, economic and political systems; as of November 20, 2020, more than 57 million people have been infected worldwide, with over 1.3 million deaths. While the global spotlight is currently focused on combating this pandemic through means ranging from finding a treatment among existing therapeutic agents to inventing a vaccine that can aid in halting the further loss of life.

Aim: To collect all systematic reviews and meta-analyses published related to COVID-19 to better identify available evidence, highlight gaps in knowledge, and elucidate further meta-analyses and umbrella reviews that are yet to be performed.

Methods: We explored studies based on systematic reviews and meta-analyses with the key-terms, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), SARS virus, coronavirus disease, COVID-19, and SARS coronavirus-2. The included studies were extracted from Embase, Medline, and Cochrane databases. The publication timeframe of included studies ranged between January 01, 2020, to October 30, 2020. Studies that were published in languages other than English were not considered for this systematic review. The finalized full-text articles are freely accessible in the public domain.

Results: Searching Embase, Medline, and Cochrane databases resulted in 1906, 669, and 19 results, respectively, that comprised 2594 studies. 515 duplicates were subsequently removed, leaving 2079 studies. The inclusion criteria were systematic reviews or meta-analyses. 860 results were excluded for being a review article, scope review, rapid review, panel review, or guideline that produced a total of 1219 studies. After screening articles were categorized, the included articles were put into main groups of clinical presentation, epidemiology, screening and diagnosis, severity assessment, special populations, and treatment. Subsequently, there was a second subclassification into the following groups: gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, neurological, stroke, thrombosis, anosmia and dysgeusia, ocular manifestations, nephrology, cutaneous manifestations, D-dimer, lymphocyte, anticoagulation, antivirals, convalescent plasma, immunosuppressants, corticosteroids, hydroxychloroquine, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, technology, diabetes mellitus, obesity, pregnancy, children, mental health smoking, cancer, and transplant.

Conclusion: Among the included articles, it is clear that further research is needed regarding treatment options and vaccines. With more studies, data will be less heterogeneous, and statistical analysis can be better applied to provide more robust clinical evidence. This study was not designed to give recommendations regarding the management of COVID-19.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5501/wjv.v10.i4.182DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8316876PMC
July 2021

Bullous drug eruption after second dose of mRNA-1273 (Moderna) COVID-19 vaccine: Case report.

J Infect Public Health 2021 Jul 8. Epub 2021 Jul 8.

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai/NYC Health + Hospitals Queens, NY, USA. Electronic address:

Background: In December 2020, Moderna released the mRNA-1273 vaccine. The most common side effects are headache, muscle pain, redness, swelling, and tenderness at the injection site. In addition, there have been dermatological adverse events, such as hypersensitivity reactions. Although rare, various bullous eruptions have been described following vaccination. Bullous pemphigoid has been reported to occur most often after receipt of influenza and the diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no reports of bullous drug eruptions resulting from mRNA vaccines.

Case Summary: A 66-years-old obese Guyanese male presented with a bullous rash following receipt of a commercial COVID-19 mRNA vaccine. He received the first dose uneventfully. However, within 24 h of receiving the second dose, he developed fever, myalgias, and malaise accompanied by a painful blistering rash of his torso, arms, and legs. His fever and myalgias improved after 24 h, but his painful rash did not, and five days after the initial symptoms, he presented to the hospital. There were many violaceous, poorly demarcated patches on his trunk, arms, and thighs on examination, many of which had large flaccid bullae within, and a few areas on his buttocks, posterior shoulder, and scrotum were eroded. The exam was also significant for lower extremity muscle tenderness, stiffness with preserved strength. A skin biopsy showed epidermal necrosis and sparse perivascular dermatitis concerning Stevens-Johnson syndrome or erythema multiforme. However, in the absence of mucous membrane involvement or targetoid lesions, the diagnosis of an extensive bullous fixed drug eruption was made.

Conclusion: This case illustrates that the bullae eruption occurred as a result of receiving the Moderna vaccination.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jiph.2021.06.021DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8264280PMC
July 2021

Monckeberg Medial Calcific Sclerosis of the Temporal Artery Masquerading as Giant Cell Arteritis: Case Reports and Literature Review.

Cureus 2020 Jul 15;12(7):e9210. Epub 2020 Jul 15.

Rheumatology, Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai/Queens Hospital Center, New York, USA.

Monckeberg medial calcific sclerosis (MCS) is an infrequent finding in the temporal artery and can clinically present almost indistinguishably from giant cell arteritis (GCA). To our knowledge, there have been only two case reports of suspected GCA found to be MCS only after a temporal artery biopsy (TAB). Herein, we present two cases. The first case is a 69-year-old female with hypertension, type-2 diabetes mellitus, and chronic headaches who presented with left temporal headaches and scalp tenderness. She had a prominently dilated, tortuous, and tender left temporal artery. Initial labs showed a leukocyte count of 11.1x10/L, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) of 29 mm/hr, and C-reactive protein (CRP) of 5.8 mg/L. The patient was started on prednisone 60 mg for presumptive GCA. Left TAB was negative for inflammatory changes, with findings consistent with MCS. Steroids were discontinued, and symptoms resolved. The second case is a 67-year-old male with hypertension, asthma, hyperlipidemia, status-post left eye cataract phacoemulsification, with intraocular lens insertion one-month prior, who presented with left eye blurriness in the inferior visual field and intermittent headache for 15 days. Left ophthalmoscopy showed retinal pallor and edema. Initial labs revealed ESR of 25 mm/hr, CRP of 11.2 mg/L, leukocyte count of 13.01x10/L. The patient was given solumedrol 120 mg once and prednisone 70 mg daily for presumptive GCA. Left TAB was negative for GCA but reported damaged elastic fibers by calcification consistent with MCS. Partial visual blurriness remained, and steroids were discontinued. This report accentuates the importance of MCS as a temporal GCA simulator. Physicians should be aware that TAB potentially changes management and may help surface underlying conditions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.9210DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7387070PMC
July 2020
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