Publications by authors named "Francesca Peluso"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Whole Exome Sequencing Is the Minimal Technological Approach in Probands Born to Consanguineous Couples.

Genes (Basel) 2021 Jun 24;12(7). Epub 2021 Jun 24.

Medical Genetics Unit, Azienda USL-IRCCS di Reggio Emilia, 42123 Reggio Emilia, Italy.

We report on two siblings suffering from different pathogenic conditions, born to consanguineous parents. A multigene panel for brain malformations and microcephaly identified the homozygous splicing variant NM_005886.3:c.1416+1del in the gene in the older sister. On the other hand, exome sequencing revealed the homozygous frameshift variant NM_005245.4:c.9729del in the gene in the younger sister, who had a more complex phenotype: in addition to bilateral anophthalmia and heart defects, she showed a right split foot with 4 toes, 5 metacarpals, second toe duplication and preaxial polydactyly on the right hand. These features have been never reported before in patients with pathogenic variants and support the role of this gene in the development of limb buds. Notably, each parent was heterozygous for both of these variants, which were ultra-rare and rare, respectively. This study raises awareness about the value of using whole exome/genome sequencing rather than targeted gene panels when testing affected offspring born to consanguineous couples. In this way, exomic data from the parents are also made available for carrier screening, to identify heterozygous pathogenetic and likely pathogenetic variants in genes responsible for other recessive conditions, which may pose a risk for subsequent pregnancies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/genes12070962DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8303193PMC
June 2021

Clinical Manifestations in a Girl with NAA10-Related Syndrome and Genotype-Phenotype Correlation in Females.

Genes (Basel) 2021 Jun 10;12(6). Epub 2021 Jun 10.

Medical Genetics Unit, Azienda USL-IRCCS di Reggio Emilia, 42123 Reggio Emilia, Italy.

Since 2011, eight males with an X-linked recessive disorder (Ogden syndrome, MIM #300855) associated with the same missense variant p.(Ser37Pro) in the gene have been described. After the advent of whole exome sequencing, many variants have been reported as causative of syndromic or non-syndromic intellectual disability in both males and females. The gene lies in the Xq28 region and encodes the catalytic subunit of the major N-terminal acetyltransferase complex NatA, which acetylates almost half the human proteome. Here, we present a young female carrying a de novo [NM_003491:c.247C > T, p.(Arg83Cys)] variant. The 18-year-old girl has severely delayed motor and language development, autistic traits, postnatal growth failure, facial dysmorphisms, interventricular septal defect, neuroimaging anomalies and epilepsy. Our attempt is to expand and compare genotype-phenotype correlation in females with -related syndrome. A detailed clinical description could have relevant consequences for the clinical management of known and newly identified individuals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/genes12060900DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8230408PMC
June 2021

Leopard-like retinopathy and severe early-onset portal hypertension expand the phenotype of KARS1-related syndrome: a case report.

BMC Med Genomics 2021 01 21;14(1):25. Epub 2021 Jan 21.

Medical Genetics Unit, Meyer Children's University Hospital, Florence, Italy.

Background: Mutations in lysyl-tRNA synthetase (KARS1), an enzyme that charges tRNA with the amino acid lysine in both the cytoplasm and mitochondria, have been associated thus far with autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth type CMTRIB, hearing loss type DFNB89, and mitochondrial encephalohepatopathy (MEH) featuring neurodevelopmental disorders with microcephaly, white matter changes, and cardiac and hepatic failure in less than 30 patients.

Case Presentation: We report the clinical, biochemical and molecular findings of a 14-month-old girl with severe MEH compatible clinical features, profound sensorineural hearing loss, leopard spot retinopathy, pancytopenia, and advanced liver disease with portal hypertension leading to death at the age of 30 months.

Conclusions: Whole exome sequencing identified two rare variants in KARS1 gene. Our report expands the allelic and clinical features of tRNA synthase disorders. Moreover, with our report we confirm the usefulness of WES as first tier diagnostic method in infants with complex multisystem phenotypes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12920-020-00863-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7818779PMC
January 2021

Expanding the phenotype of Wiedemann-Steiner syndrome: Craniovertebral junction anomalies.

Am J Med Genet A 2020 12 11;182(12):2877-2886. Epub 2020 Oct 11.

Medical Genetics Unit, Meyer Children's University Hospital, Florence, Italy.

Wiedemann-Steiner syndrome (WDSTS) is a rare autosomal dominant condition caused by heterozygous loss of function variants in the KMT2A (MLL) gene, encoding a lysine N-methyltransferase that mediates a histone methylation pattern specific for epigenetic transcriptional activation. WDSTS is characterized by a distinctive facial phenotype, hypertrichosis, short stature, developmental delay, intellectual disability, congenital malformations, and skeletal anomalies. Recently, a few patients have been reported having abnormal skeletal development of the cervical spine. Here we describe 11 such individuals, all with KMT2A de novo loss-of-function variants: 10 showed craniovertebral junction anomalies, while an 11th patient had a cervical abnormality in C7. By evaluating clinical and diagnostic imaging data we characterized these anomalies, which consist primarily of fused cervical vertebrae, C1 and C2 abnormalities, small foramen magnum and Chiari malformation type I. Craniovertebral anomalies in WDSTS patients have been largely disregarded so far, but the increasing number of reports suggests that they may be an intrinsic feature of this syndrome. Specific investigation strategies should be considered for early identification and prevention of craniovertebral junction complications in WDSTS patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.61859DOI Listing
December 2020

Identification, molecular characterization and segregation analysis of a variant pre-mutation allele in a three-generation Italian family.

Acta Myol 2020 Mar 1;39(1):13-18. Epub 2020 Mar 1.

Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy.

DM1 is an autosomal dominant multisystemic disease caused by an unstable CTG repeat expansion in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of the gene. The complex variant expanded the alleles containing CAG, CCG, CTC and/or GGC interruptions repetition sequences have been reported in 3-8% of DM1 patients. To date, very few information is available about the frequency and clinical consequences of pre-mutated variant allele. In this study, we describe a three-generation Italian family showing the segregation of an interrupted allele within the premutation range. TP-PCR with primers complementary to CCG repetitions and direct sequencing allow us to identify a hetero-triplet (CTG)(CCGCTG)(CTG) repeat structure. The haplotype analysis demonstrated that this variant allele is associated with the European founder DM1 haplotype. The pyrosequencing analysis of the CpG islands contained in the flanking regions of the CTG array, did not show the presence of a of the CCG interruptions on the methylation profile of the DM1 locus. The analysis of both meiotic transmissions, one maternal and one paternal, revealed the intrafamilial stability of the DM1 premutation among relatives. Our findings further support the hypothesis of a stabilizing effect of CCG interruptions on the mutational dynamics of the DM1 locus, also in intermediate alleles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.36185/2532-1900-002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7315898PMC
March 2020

Novel mutations in and are associated with posterior microphthalmos.

Ophthalmic Genet 2020 02 2;41(1):49-56. Epub 2020 Mar 2.

Pediatric Ophthalmology Unit, A. Meyer Children's Hospital, Firenze, Italy.

: Biallelic pathogenic variants in and genes can be responsible for nanophthalmos (NO) or posterior microphthalmos (PM). This study describes detailed clinical and molecular findings in a series of five patients affected by PM from four unrelated families.: All patients underwent a complete ophthalmological and genetic evaluation. For proper and deep phenotyping a multimodal instrumental approach was used for all cases: B-scan ultrasound, spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), fundus retinal imaging and anterior segment data were obtained. Molecular analysis of and genes was performed with Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) methodology and segregation analysis on parents and one affected sibling was performed with Sanger sequencing.: A very high hyperopia of +14.00D or more was the main refractive error and macular abnormalities were identified in all patients. Axial length ranged from 15.3 mm to 17.86 mm (mean 16.58 mm) and age at first presentation ranged from 6 to 36 months (mean 18 months). Anterior chamber depth was within normal values, according to age, while total axial length was severely reduced in all patients. All our patients met the diagnostic criteria for PM. Three patients, including a pair of siblings, carried compound heterozygous mutations in the gene; in the other two patients, one homozygous or two compound heterozygous mutations in the gene were detected.: Our study describes four novel mutations in the gene and one in the gene in patients with non-syndromic posterior microphthalmos. Proper genotype-phenotype correlation and early diagnosis could lead to good functional results.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13816810.2020.1731835DOI Listing
February 2020

An early diagnosis of trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type 1: a case report and a review of literature.

Ital J Pediatr 2018 Nov 20;44(1):138. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Meyer University Children's Hospital, University of Florence, Florence, Italy.

Background: Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome (TRPS) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by defects involving the TRPS1 gene. It exhibits distinctive craniofacial, ectodermal and skeletal abnormalities, such as sparse hair, bulbous nasal tip and short deformed fingers, with extremely variable expressivity.

Case Presentation: We report the case of a 17 months old girl, who presented growth retardation and dysmorphic features. Postnatal growth was always below - 2 Standard Deviation for both weight and length and physical examination revealed relative macrocephaly, sparse hair, bulbous nasal tip, thin upper lip, protruding ears, prominent forehead, small jaw, and short hands and feet. Patient's mother shared the same facial features, and presented sparse hair and small hands. The maternal grandfather and two uncles presented short stature, bulbous nasal tip, thin hair, and premature alopecia. Molecular analysis of TRPS1 gene showed a heterozygous c.2086C > T;(p.Arg696Ter) mutation both in the patient and her mother, confirming the diagnosis of TRPS, type I.

Conclusions: Clinical phenotype of TRPS can be subtle and the syndrome often remains undiagnosed. A comprehensive clinical examination and an exhaustive family history are crucial to reach the correct diagnosis, which is essential to perform adequate follow-up and timely therapeutic procedures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13052-018-0580-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6245908PMC
November 2018
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