Publications by authors named "François Tison"

156 Publications

Dysphagia in multiple system atrophy consensus statement on diagnosis, prognosis and treatment.

Parkinsonism Relat Disord 2021 Mar 30. Epub 2021 Mar 30.

Department of Neurology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address:

Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a combination of autonomic failure plus cerebellar syndrome and/or parkinsonism. Dysphagia is a frequent and disabling symptom in MSA and its occurrence within 5 years of motor onset is an additional diagnostic feature. Dysphagia can lead to aspiration pneumonia, a recognized cause of death in MSA. Guidelines for diagnosis and management of dysphagia in MSA are lacking. An International Consensus Conference among experts with methodological support was convened in Bologna to reach consensus statements for the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of dysphagia in MSA. Abnormalities of the oral and pharyngeal phases of swallowing, esophageal dysfunction and aspiration occur in MSA and worsen as the disease progresses. According to the consensus, dysphagia should be investigated through available screening questionnaires and clinical and instrumental assessment (videofluoroscopic study or fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing and manometry) at the time of MSA diagnosis and periodically thereafter. There is evidence that dysphagia is associated with poor survival in MSA, however effective treatments for dysphagia are lacking. Compensatory strategies like diet modification, swallowing maneuvers and head postures should be applied and botulinum toxin injection may be effective in specific conditions. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy may be performed when there is a severe risk of malnutrition and pulmonary complications, but its impact on survival is undetermined. Several research gaps and unmet needs for research involving diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment were identified.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parkreldis.2021.03.027DOI Listing
March 2021

Fluoxetine for the Symptomatic Treatment of Multiple System Atrophy: The MSA-FLUO Trial.

Mov Disord 2021 Apr 1. Epub 2021 Apr 1.

Service de Neurologie des Maladies Neurodégénératives, French Reference Center for MSA, NS-Park/FCRIN Network, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France.

Background: There are no effective treatments for multiple system atrophy (MSA).

Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of the serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (40 mg/d) for the symptomatic treatment of MSA.

Methods: This was a double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, randomized trial in patients with "probable" MSA. The primary outcome was the change from baseline to week 12 in the mean total score of the Unified MSA Rating Scale (UMSARS Parts I + II). Secondary outcomes included change from baseline to week 6 in total UMSARS, and change from baseline to week 12 in the Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson Disease-Autonomic Dysfunction, Beck Depression Inventory, and different domains of the MSA-Quality of Life Questionnaire. Exploratory outcomes included change from baseline to week 12 in the UMSARS Parts I and II separately and change from baseline to week 24 in the total UMSARS score.

Results: A total of 81 patients were randomly assigned, with no significant difference in the primary outcome (-2.13 units [95% confidence interval, CI, -4.55 to 0.29]; P = 0.08). There was a greater reduction on fluoxetine in the change from baseline to 12-week in UMSARS Part II (exploratory outcome: -1.41 units [95% CI, -2.84; 0.03]; p = 0.05) and in MSA-QoL emotional/social dimension (secondary outcome: -6.99 units [95% CI, -13.40; -0.56]; p < 0.03). A total of 5 deaths occurred (3 on fluoxetine and 2 on placebo).

Conclusion: The MSA-FLUO failed to demonstrate fluoxetine superiority over placebo on the total UMSARS score, whereas trends in motor and emotional secondary/exploratory outcomes deserve further investigation. © 2021 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mds.28569DOI Listing
April 2021

Expanding the clinical spectrum of STIP1 homology and U-box containing protein 1-associated ataxia.

J Neurol 2021 Jan 8. Epub 2021 Jan 8.

Service de Génétique Médicale, Hôpitaux de Brabois, CHRU de Nancy, Rue du Morvan, 54500, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France.

Background: STUB1 has been first associated with autosomal recessive (SCAR16, MIM# 615768) and later with dominant forms of ataxia (SCA48, MIM# 618093). Pathogenic variations in STUB1 are now considered a frequent cause of cerebellar ataxia.

Objective: We aimed to improve the clinical, radiological, and molecular delineation of SCAR16 and SCA48.

Methods: Retrospective collection of patients with SCAR16 or SCA48 diagnosed in three French genetic centers (Montpellier, Strasbourg and Nancy).

Results: Here, we report four SCAR16 and nine SCA48 patients from two SCAR16 and five SCA48 unrelated French families. All presented with slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia. Additional findings included cognitive decline, dystonia, parkinsonism and swallowing difficulties. The age at onset was highly variable, ranging from 14 to 76 years. Brain MRI showed marked cerebellar atrophy in all patients. Phenotypic findings associated with STUB1 pathogenic variations cover a broad spectrum, ranging from isolated slowly progressive ataxia to severe encephalopathy, and include extrapyramidal features. We described five new pathogenic variations, two previously reported pathogenic variations, and two rare variants of unknown significance in association with STUB1-related disorders. We also report the first pathogenic variation associated with both dominant and recessive forms of inheritance (SCAR16 and SCA48).

Conclusion: Even though differences are observed between the recessive and dominant forms, it appears that a continuum exists between these two entities. While adding new symptoms associated with STUB1 pathogenic variations, we insist on the difficulty of genetic counselling in STUB1-related pathologies. Finally, we underscore the usefulness of DAT-scan as an additional clue for diagnosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00415-020-10348-xDOI Listing
January 2021

Patterns of quadruple therapy use including bismuth for Helicobacter pylori eradication: A cohort study in the French national claims database.

Therapie 2020 Sep 25. Epub 2020 Sep 25.

Inserm CIC1401, Bordeaux PharmacoEpi, University of Bordeaux, 33076 Bordeaux, France; Inserm U1219, University of Bordeaux, 33076 Bordeaux, France. Electronic address:

Background: Quadruple therapy using a single capsule formulation of bismuth, metronidazole and tetracycline (BMT; Pylera®), associated with omeprazole for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori, represents the reintroduction of bismuth in France after 40 years.

Objective: To describe the real-life patterns of use of BMT following a request from the French health authorities.

Methods: Patients with a first BMT dispensing (index date, ID), with one year of data before and after ID, were identified in the French nationwide claims database 1/97 sample. Misuse of BMT was defined as dispensing>1 pack of BMT at ID or absence of a diagnostic test in the preceding year.

Results: In total, 540 patients were included. Prescribers were gastroenterologists (n=243; 45%) and general practitioners (n=160; 30%). A proton pump inhibitor was co-dispensed to 504 patients (96%). Ten patients (2%) had contraindications to BMT. Fifty-nine patients (11%) met the misuse criteria: ten (2%) were dispensed>1 pack of BMT and 49 (9%) had not had a diagnostic test for H. pylori in the previous year. During follow-up, 27 patients (5%) required retreatment (treatment failure).

Conclusion: In this real-life study, most patients were dispensed only one pack of BMT, consistent with recommendations. Misuse related principally to the absence of prior diagnostic test for H. pylori.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.therap.2020.09.002DOI Listing
September 2020

Clinical relevance of brain atrophy subtypes categorization in memory clinics.

Alzheimers Dement 2021 04 15;17(4):641-652. Epub 2020 Dec 15.

Univ. Bordeaux, Inserm U1219, Institut de Santé Publique, d'Epidémiologie et de Développement (ISPED), Pôle de Sante Publique, CHU de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France.

Introduction: The clinical relevance of brain atrophy subtypes categorization in non-demented persons without a priori knowledge regarding their amyloid status or clinical presentation is unknown.

Methods: A total of 2083 outpatients with either subjective cognitive complaint or mild cognitive impairment at study entry were followed during 4 years (MEMENTO cohort). Atrophy subtypes were defined using baseline magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and previously described algorithms.

Results: Typical/diffuse atrophy was associated with faster cognitive decline and the highest risk of developing dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) over time, both in the whole analytic sample and in amyloid-positive participants. Hippocampal-sparing and limbic-predominant atrophy were also associated with incident dementia, with faster cognitive decline in the limbic predominant atrophy group. Lewy body dementia was more frequent in the hippocampal-sparing and minimal/no atrophy groups.

Discussion: Atrophy subtypes categorization predicted different subsequent patterns of cognitive decline and rates of conversion to distinct etiologies of dementia in persons attending memory clinics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/alz.12231DOI Listing
April 2021

A Phase 2 Randomized Trial of Asleep versus Awake Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease.

Stereotact Funct Neurosurg 2020 Nov 30:1-11. Epub 2020 Nov 30.

CHU de Bordeaux, Service de Neurochirurgie B, Bordeaux, France.

Objective: Asleep deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson's disease (PD) is being performed more frequently; however, motor outcomes and safety of asleep DBS have never been assessed in a prospective randomized trial.

Methods: We conducted a prospective, randomized, noncomparative trial to assess the motor outcomes of asleep DBS. Leads were implanted in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) according to probabilistic stereotactic coordinates with a surgical robot under O-arm© imaging guidance under either general anesthesia without microelectrode recordings (MER) (20 patients, asleep group) or local anesthesia with MER and clinical testing (9 patients, awake group).

Results: The mean motor improvement rates on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part III (UPDRS-3) between OFF and ON stimulation without medication were 52.3% (95% CI: 45.4-59.2%) in the asleep group and 47.0% (95% CI: 23.8-70.2%) in the awake group, 6 months after surgery. Except for a subcutaneous hematoma, we did not observe any complications related to the surgery. Three patients (33%) in the awake group and 8 in the asleep group (40%) had at least one side effect potentially linked with neurostimulation.

Conclusions: Owing to its randomized design, our study supports the hypothesis that motor outcomes after asleep STN-DBS in PD may be noninferior to the standard awake procedure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000511424DOI Listing
November 2020

Correction to: Excessive buccal saliva in patients with Parkinson's disease of the French COPARK cohort.

J Neural Transm (Vienna) 2020 Oct 21. Epub 2020 Oct 21.

Biomedical Research Center, Interamerican Open University (CAECIHS-UAI), National Research Council (CONICET), Buenos Aires, Argentina.

The original version of this article unfortunately contained a mistake in Fig. 2 caption.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00702-020-02264-1DOI Listing
October 2020

Characterization of Recessive Parkinson Disease in a Large Multicenter Study.

Ann Neurol 2020 10 28;88(4):843-850. Epub 2020 Jul 28.

Research Unit UMR 1127, Sorbonne University, Paris, France.

Studies of the phenotype and population distribution of rare genetic forms of parkinsonism are required, now that gene-targeting approaches for Parkinson disease have reached the clinical trial stage. We evaluated the frequencies of PRKN, PINK1, and DJ-1 mutations in a cohort of 1,587 cases. Mutations were found in 14.1% of patients; 27.6% were familial and 8% were isolated. PRKN was the gene most frequently mutated in Caucasians, whereas PINK1 mutations predominated in Arab-Berber individuals. Patients with PRKN mutations had an earlier age at onset, and less asymmetry, levodopa-induced motor complications, dysautonomia, and dementia than those without mutations. ANN NEUROL 2020;88:843-850.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ana.25787DOI Listing
October 2020

Brain 5-HT1A Receptor Binding in Multiple System Atrophy: An [ F]-MPPF PET Study.

Mov Disord 2021 01 21;36(1):246-251. Epub 2020 Sep 21.

Service de Neurologie, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France.

Background: Loss of medullary serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) neurons has been linked to respiratory disturbances in multiple system atrophy (MSA). Broader 5-hydroxytryptamine dysfunction may contribute to additional motor/nonmotor symptoms in MSA. The objective of this study was to compare brain 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor binding between MSA and healthy controls. Secondary objectives were to compare 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor binding between MSA and Parkinson's disease (PD) and to assess potential associations with motor/nonmotor symptoms in MSA.

Methods: 2'-Methoxyphenyl-(N-2'-pyridinyl)-p-18F-fluoro-benzamidoethylpiperazine positron emission tomography was performed in matched MSA patients (n = 16), PD patients (n = 15), and healthy controls (n = 18).

Results: 2'-Methoxyphenyl-(N-2'-pyridinyl)-p-18F-fluoro-benzamidoethylpiperazine distribution volume ratios were lower in MSA patients versus healthy controls in several brain regions including the caudate, raphe nuclei, thalamus, and brain stem. Distribution volume ratios were also lower in brain stem and amygdala in MSA versus PD. Moderate associations were found between 2'-methoxyphenyl-(N-2'-pyridinyl)-p-18F-fluoro-benzamidoethylpiperazine distribution volume ratios and fatigue, pain, and apathy in MSA.

Conclusion: Our results demonstrate 5-hydroxytryptamine dysfunction in several brain regions in MSA, which may contribute to fatigue, pain, and apathy. © 2020 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mds.28295DOI Listing
January 2021

Excessive buccal saliva in patients with Parkinson's disease of the French COPARK cohort.

J Neural Transm (Vienna) 2020 12 2;127(12):1607-1617. Epub 2020 Sep 2.

Biomedical Research Center, Interamerican Open University (CAECIHS-UAI), National Research Council (CONICET), Buenos Aires, Argentina.

We describe excessive buccal saliva (EBS) prevalence in patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD) and controls of the COPARK study, its changes between "ON" and OFF" conditions and over time, its impact on Health-related Quality of life (HRQoL), and factors associated with this condition. We studied 671 ambulatory PD patients and 177 age/sex-matched controls. We defined "sialorrhea" as UPDRS item #6 (salivation) = 1 or 2; and "drooling" as item #6 = 3 or 4. SCOPA-Aut drooling score (item #2) was also available in a subset (45%) of the cohort. HRQoL was assessed by the PDQ-39 and SF-36 scales. Twenty-four months' follow-up data were available in 401/671 patients. EBS as assessed by UPDRS was present in 38% of PD patients in the "ON" condition ("Sialorrhea": 35%; "drooling": 3%). There were also more PD patients reporting "drooling" than controls according to the SCOPA-Aut (49% vs 19%, p < 0.01). UPDRS salivation score was worse in the "OFF" vs "ON" condition in PD patients with motor fluctuations (0.90 ± 0.94 vs 0.54 ± 0.79, p < 0.01). UPDRS salivation score worsened after ~ 24 months of follow-up (0.47 ± 0.70 vs 0.64 ± 0.81, p < 0.01). Worse PDQ-39 scores were observed in PD patients with EBS in bivariate but not in multivariate analyses. EBS was directly related to PD duration and severity, male gender, dysphagia, hypomimia, and autonomic dysfunction (logistic regression). EBS was more frequent in PD patients than controls, worsened in the "OFF" condition and after ~ 24 months of follow-up, moderately affected HRQoL, and was correlated with indices of bradykinesia, dysphagia, and autonomic dysfunction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00702-020-02249-0DOI Listing
December 2020

Cognitive and functional changes in prediagnostic phase of Parkinson disease: A population-based study.

Parkinsonism Relat Disord 2020 Aug 15;79:40-46. Epub 2020 Aug 15.

Institut des Maladies Neurodégénératives-Clinique (IMNc), University Hospital Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France; Institut des Maladies Neurodégénératives, CNRS, UMR 5293, Bordeaux University, Bordeaux, France.

Introduction: Prodromal non-motor symptoms precede, often by decades, motor signs and diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. It is however still uncertain if cognitive changes belong to the spectrum of non-motor prodromal Parkinson's disease. Thanks to the very long-term follow-up of the PAQUID population-based cohort, we assessed trajectories of cognitive complaints and functioning over a 13-year period before the diagnosis of late onset Parkinson's disease.

Methods: This study relies on a matched nested case-control sample selected from the cohort. Of the 3777 initial subjects of the cohort, 43 developed incident Parkinson's disease over the follow-up. The mean age at diagnosis was 78.0 (standard deviation = 5.8) years and 46.5% were men. These cases were matched to 86 elderly control subjects. Scores of different cognitive domains, daily function, and depressive symptoms were described throughout the follow-up using mixed-effects models.

Results: No significant global cognitive decline preceded the diagnosis of late onset Parkinson's disease. However, psychomotor speed appeared significantly slower 2 years before the diagnosis and depressive symptoms 12 years before. Global score of instrumental activities of daily living became altered 2-3 years preceding the diagnosis of late onset Parkinson's disease, including the use of public transportation that was altered ten years before the diagnosis.

Conclusion: In late onset Parkinson's disease, while global cognitive functions seem preserved, psychomotor speed starts to decline 2 years before the diagnosis and activities of daily living are also impacted. Depressive symptoms appear very early in the prediagnosic phase.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parkreldis.2020.08.022DOI Listing
August 2020

Genetic and Phenotypic Basis of Autosomal Dominant Parkinson's Disease in a Large Multi-Center Cohort.

Front Neurol 2020 28;11:682. Epub 2020 Jul 28.

Sorbonne Université, Unité Mixte de Recherche (UMR) 1127, Paris, France.

, and are unequivocally associated with autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). We evaluated the prevalence of , and mutations and associated clinical features in a large French multi-center cohort of PD patients. Demographic and clinical data were collected for 1,805 index cases (592 with autosomal dominant inheritance and 1,213 isolated cases) since 1990. All probands were screened with TaqMan assays for Gly2019Ser. In the absence of this mutation, the coding sequences of the three genes were analyzed by Sanger sequencing and/or next-generation sequencing. The data for the three genes were analyzed according to age at onset, family history, ethnic origin and clinical features. We identified 160 index cases (8.9%) with known pathogenic variants: 138 with pathogenic variants (7.6%), including 136 with the Gly2019Ser mutation, 19 with point mutations or genomic rearrangements (1.1%), and three with the Asp620Asn mutation (0.16%). Mutation frequencies were higher in familial than isolated cases, consistent with autosomal dominant inheritance (12.0 vs. 7.3%; OR 1.7, 95% CI [1.2-2.4], = 0.001). PD patients with variants were more likely to have higher rates of late-onset PD (>50 years; OR 1.5, 95% CI [1.0-2.1], = 0.03), whereas those with mutations tended to have earlier age at onset disease (≤ 50 years, = 0.06). The clinical features of carriers and those without any pathogenic variants in known PD-associated genes were similar. The likelihood of detecting disease-causing mutations was higher in cases compatible with autosomal dominant inheritance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2020.00682DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7399219PMC
July 2020

Optimizing Treatment in Undertreated Late-Stage Parkinsonism: A Pragmatic Randomized Trial.

J Parkinsons Dis 2020 ;10(3):1171-1184

UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology, University College London, Royal Free Campus, Rowland Hill Street, London, UK.

Background: Treatment of patients with late-stage parkinsonism is often sub-optimal.

Objective: To test the effectiveness of recommendations by a movement disorder specialist with expertise in late-stage parkinsonism.

Methods: Ninety-one patients with late-stage parkinsonism considered undertreated were included in apragmatic a pragmatic multi-center randomized-controlled trial with six-month follow-up. The intervention group received a letter with treatment recommendations to their primary clinician based on an extensive clinical assessment. Controls received care as usual. The primary outcome was the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS)part-II (Activities of Daily Living). Other outcomes included quality-of-life (PDQ-8), mental health (UPDRS-I), motor function (UPDRS-III), treatment complications (UPDRS-IV), cognition (Mini-mental-state-examination), non-motor symptoms (Non-Motor-Symptoms-scale), health status (EQ-5D-5L) and levodopa-equivalent-daily-dose (LEDD). We also assessed adherence to recommendations. In addition to intention-to-treat analyses, a per-protocol analysis was conducted.

Results: Sample size calculation required 288 patients, but only 91 patients could be included. Treating physicians followed recommendations fully in 16 (28%) and partially in 21 (36%) patients. The intention-to-treat analysis showed no difference in primary outcome (between-group difference = -1.2, p = 0.45), but there was greater improvement for PDQ-8 in the intervention group (between-group difference = -3.7, p = 0.02). The per-protocol analysis confirmed these findings, and showed less deterioration in UPDRS-part I, greater improvement on UPDRS-total score and greater increase in LEDD in the intervention group.

Conclusions: The findings suggest that therapeutic gains may be reached even in this vulnerable group of patients with late-stage parkinsonism, but also emphasize that specialist recommendations need to be accompanied by better strategies to implement these to further improve outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/JPD-202033DOI Listing
January 2020

Characterization of recessive Parkinson's disease in a large multicenter study.

Ann Neurol 2020 May 30. Epub 2020 May 30.

Research Unit UMR_1127 at Sorbonne Université, Paris, France.

Studies of the phenotype and population distribution of rare genetic forms of parkinsonism are required, now that gene-targeting approaches for Parkinson's disease have reached the clinical trial stage. We evaluated the frequencies of PRKN, PINK1, and DJ-1 mutations in a cohort of 1587 cases. Mutations were found in 14.1% of patients: 27.6% were familial and 8% were isolated. PRKN was the gene most frequently mutated in Caucasians whereas PINK1 mutations predominated in Arab-Berber individuals. Patients with PRKN mutations had an earlier age at onset, and less asymmetry, levodopa-induced motor complications, dysautonomia, and dementia than those without mutations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ana.25787DOI Listing
May 2020

Differential annualized rates of hippocampal subfields atrophy in aging and future Alzheimer's clinical syndrome.

Neurobiol Aging 2020 06 1;90:75-83. Epub 2020 Feb 1.

Univ. Bordeaux, CNRS, Institut des Maladies Neurodégénératives, Bordeaux, France; Centre Mémoire de Ressources et de Recherches, Pôle de Neurosciences Cliniques, CHU de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France. Electronic address:

Several studies have investigated the differential vulnerability of hippocampal subfields during aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Results were often contradictory, mainly because these works were based on concatenations of cross-sectional measures in cohorts with different ages or stages of AD, in the absence of a longitudinal design. Here, we investigated 327 participants from a population-based cohort of nondemented older adults with a 14-year clinical follow-up. MRI at baseline and 4 years later were assessed to measure the annualized rates of hippocampal subfields atrophy in each participant using an automatic segmentation pipeline with subsequent quality control. On the one hand, CA4 dentate gyrus was significantly more affected than the other subfields in the whole population (CA1-3: -0.68%/year; subiculum: -0.99%/year; and CA4-DG: -1.39%/year; p < 0.0001). On the other hand, the annualized rate of CA1-3 atrophy was associated with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's clinical syndrome over time, independently of age, gender, educational level, and ApoE4 genotype (HR = 2.0; CI 95% 1.4-3.0). These results illustrate the natural history of hippocampal subfields atrophy during aging and AD by showing that the dentate gyrus is the most vulnerable subfield to the effects of aging while the cornu-ammonis is the primary target of AD pathophysiological processes, years before symptom onset.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2020.01.011DOI Listing
June 2020

Disease progression and prognostic factors in multiple system atrophy: A prospective cohort study.

Neurobiol Dis 2020 06 20;139:104813. Epub 2020 Feb 20.

French Reference Centre for MSA, University Hospital Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France; Institut des Maladies Neurodégénératives, CNRS, UMR 5293, Bordeaux University, Bordeaux, France; Dept. Medicine, University of Otago, Christchurch, and New Zealand Brain Research Institute, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare neurodegenerative disease, with limited understanding of disease progression and prognostic factors. We leveraged the data of a large prospective cohort of MSA to study both clinical progression and survival and assess their determinants. All consecutive patients seen at the French Reference Centre for MSA since 2007 were included in a prospective cohort with an annual follow-up including the Unified MSA Rating Scale (UMSARS). We used joint models to evaluate the risk of death, the mean trajectory of each UMSARS subscale and to determine the potential factors. Investigated factors included gender, age at baseline, MSA subtype, diagnosis certainty, type of first symptoms and the duration between symptom onset and the first visit. Among the 261 MSA patients included in our cohort, the median duration of clinical follow-up was 2.1 years (up to 10.3 years) and the median survival was 4.0 years since the first visit. Main factors for poor survival were the progression over time of UMSARS score (I + II and IV) and the severity of orthostatic hypotension. MSA subtype had no effect on progression or survival. The UMSARS I + II score progressed faster over time in subjects with autonomic dysfunction as the initial feature and in women. Despite a faster progression, women and men had similar survival. From this large MSA cohort, we confirm the rapid progression and poor prognosis of MSA. We provide additional evidence for a negative impact of early autonomic dysfunction and the severity of orthostatic hypotension on both disease progression and survival.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nbd.2020.104813DOI Listing
June 2020

Utilization Patterns of Amantadine in Parkinson's Disease Patients Enrolled in the French COPARK Study.

Drugs Aging 2020 03;37(3):215-223

Institute of Cardiology Research, University of Buenos Aires, National Research Council (CONICET-ININCA), Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Introduction: Immediate-release (IR) amantadine has been marketed for Parkinson's disease (PD) therapy for 50 years, while two novel extended-release formulations have only recently reached the market in the US.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe amantadine IR utilization patterns in the French COPARK cohort, at baseline and after 2 years of follow-up.

Methods: Overall, 683 PD patients from the COPARK survey were evaluated. All patients were assessed in a standardized manner (demographics, treatments, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale [UPDRS], Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Pittsburg Questionnaire and health-related quality-of-life scales (Short Form-36 [SF-36], 39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire [PDQ-39]). Longitudinal data were only available for 401/683 patients (59%) with a median (P25-75) follow-up period of 23 months (18-31). Patients were assessed in the same way as in the baseline visit.

Results: At baseline, amantadine was prescribed to 61/683 (9%) patients (median dose 200 mg/day, range 100-300 mg/day). Amantadine was initiated after a median of 7 years from PD diagnosis, and its prescription was correlated with the presence of dyskinesia (logistic regression odds ratio [OR] 3.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.95-7.08) and hallucinations (UPDRS I.2) [OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.08-2.29]. After 2 years, the amantadine prescription increased from 33 (8%) patients at baseline to 54 (14%) patients in the subset of 401 patients analysed twice (p = 0.001). Among the 33 patients receiving amantadine at baseline, 9 (27%) stopped amantadine, 5 (15%) increased the dose, 6 (18%) reduced the dose and 13 (40%) stayed at the same doses. Treatment was initiated in 30/54 new patients (55%). Patients who started amantadine or increased its dose (n = 35) had more levodopa-induced dyskinesias at baseline (OR 7.02, 95% CI 3.09-15.90) and higher Mini-Mental State Examination score at follow-up (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.06-1.79). Undergoing deep brain stimulation was related to stopping or downtitrating amantadine (OR 22.02, 95% CI 4.24-114.44; n = 15).

Conclusions: In this cohort, amantadine was used in 10% of patients. Its use increased during follow-up, despite the fact that one-third of patients who received amantadine at baseline stopped taking it. Amantadine prescription was mainly correlated with the presence of dyskinesia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40266-019-00740-2DOI Listing
March 2020

Multiple System Atrophy: Recent Developments and Future Perspectives.

Mov Disord 2019 11 6;34(11):1629-1642. Epub 2019 Nov 6.

Services de Neurologie et de Pharmacologie Clinique, Centre de Reference AMS, Centre d'Investigation Clinique, Réseau NS-Park/FCRIN et Centre of Excellence for Neurodegenerative Disorders (COEN) de Toulouse, CHU de Toulouse, Toulouse 3 University, Toulouse, France.

Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare and fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a variable combination of parkinsonism, cerebellar impairment, and autonomic dysfunction. The pathologic hallmark is the accumulation of aggregated α-synuclein in oligodendrocytes, forming glial cytoplasmic inclusions, which qualifies MSA as a synucleinopathy together with Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. The underlying pathogenesis is still not well understood. Some symptomatic treatments are available, whereas neuroprotection remains an urgent unmet treatment need. In this review, we critically appraise significant developments of the past decade with emphasis on pathogenesis, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment development. We further discuss unsolved questions and highlight some perspectives. © 2019 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mds.27894DOI Listing
November 2019

Stridor in multiple system atrophy: Consensus statement on diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment.

Neurology 2019 10;93(14):630-639

From the IRCCS (P.C., G.C.-B., G.G., F.P., L.V.), Istituto delle Scienze Neurologiche di Bologna, Bologna, Italy; Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche e Neuromotorie (P.C., G.C.-B., G.G., P.M., F.P.), Università di Bologna, Bologna, Italy; Department of Neurology (E.E.B., P.A.L.), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Multidisciplinary Sleep Unit (A.I.), Neurology Service, Hospital Clinic de Barcelona, IDIBAPS CIBERNED, Barcelona, Spain; UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology (N.Q.), Queen Square, London; Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Unit (E.T.), Neurology Service, Hospital Clinic de Barcelona; Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS) (E.T.), University of Barcelona (UB), and Centre for Networked Biomedical Research on Neurodegenerative Diseases (CIBERNED), Barcelona, Spain; Department of Neurology (G.K.W.), Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck, Austria; Department of Neuroscience (G.A.), Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics and Maternal Child Health, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy; The Multiple System Atrophy Coalition, Inc. (P.B.), Charlotte, NC; Neurophysiopathology Unit (E.A.), IRCCS "C. Mondino" Foundation, Pavia, Italy; Department of Clinical Neurophysiology (I.G.), CHU de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France; Université de Bordeaux (I.G.), Institut de Neurosciences Cognitives et Intégratives d'Aquitaine, Bordeaux, France; CNRS (I.G.), Institut de Neurosciences Cognitives et Intégratives d'Aquitaine, Bordeaux, France; Department of Neurology (T.O.), Uonuma Institute of Community Medicine, Niigata University Medical and Dental Hospital, Minami Uonuma, Niigata, Japan; Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Unit (C.P., N.G.P.), IRCCS "C. Mondino" Foundation, Pavia; Dipartimento di Medicina Specialistica (C.V.), Diagnostica e Sperimentale (DIMES), University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy; Dipartimento di Scienze biomediche e chirurgico specialistiche (C.V.), University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy; Department of Neurosciences (A.A.), University of Padua, Padua, Italy; Department of Clinical and Motor Neuroscience (A.P.B.), UCL Institute of Neurology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London; Spinal Unit (J.B.), Montecatone Rehabilitation Institute, Imola, Italy; Department of Neurology (H.K.), New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY; Department of Medicine (M.T.P.), Surgery and Dentistry "Scuola Medica Salernitana", University of Salerno, Salerno, Italy; "Luigi Sacco" Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences (N.P., A.S.), University of Milan, Milan, Italy; Service de Neurologie (F.T., W.G.M.), CRMR Atrophie Multisystématisée, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France; Univ. de Bordeaux (F.T., W.G.M.), Institut des Maladies Neurodégénératives, Bordeaux, France; and Department Medicine (W.G.M.), University of Otago, Christchurch, and New Zealand Brain Research Institute, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a combination of autonomic failure, cerebellar ataxia, and parkinsonism. Laryngeal stridor is an additional feature for MSA diagnosis, showing a high diagnostic positive predictive value, and its early occurrence might contribute to shorten survival. A consensus definition of stridor in MSA is lacking, and disagreement persists about its diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. An International Consensus Conference among experts with methodological support was convened in Bologna in 2017 to define stridor in MSA and to reach consensus statements for the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Stridor was defined as a strained, high-pitched, harsh respiratory sound, mainly inspiratory, occurring only during sleep or during both sleep and wakefulness, and caused by laryngeal dysfunction leading to narrowing of the rima glottidis. According to the consensus, stridor may be recognized clinically by the physician if present at the time of examination, with the help of a witness, or by listening to an audio recording. Laryngoscopy is suggested to exclude mechanical lesions or functional vocal cord abnormalities related to different neurologic conditions. If the suspicion of stridor needs confirmation, drug-induced sleep endoscopy or video polysomnography may be useful. The impact of stridor on survival and quality of life remains uncertain. Continuous positive airway pressure and tracheostomy are both suggested as symptomatic treatment of stridor, but whether they improve survival is uncertain. Several research gaps emerged involving diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Unmet needs for research were identified.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000008208DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6814413PMC
October 2019

Assessment of plasma creatine kinase as biomarker for levodopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease.

J Neural Transm (Vienna) 2019 06 16;126(6):789-793. Epub 2019 May 16.

Service de Neurologie, Hôpital Pellegrin, CHU de Bordeaux, 33000, Bordeaux, France.

We tested in a translational approach the usefulness of plasma creatine kinase (CK) as an objective biomarker for levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID). Plasma CK levels were measured in five dyskinetic parkinsonian non-human primates (NHP) and in ten PD patients with LID who participated in a treatment trial with simvastatin. Plasma CK levels were increased in dyskinetic NHP and correlated with LID severity while they were not affected by LID severity in PD patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00702-019-02015-xDOI Listing
June 2019

Bismuth Concentrations in Patients Treated in Real-Life Practice with a Bismuth Subcitrate-Metronidazole-Tetracycline Preparation: The SAPHARY Study.

Drug Saf 2019 08;42(8):993-1003

Bordeaux PharmacoEpi, University of Bordeaux, Bâtiment Le Tondu, Case 41, 146, rue Léo Saignat, 33076, Bordeaux Cedex, France.

Introduction: A fixed-dose association of bismuth subcitrate, metronidazole and tetracycline (BMT) (Pylera, Allergan, NJ, USA) was made available in France in 2013 for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori. Due to a historical issue of bismuth encephalopathy, the French Health Authorities requested a study of blood and plasma bismuth concentrations with BMT in daily practice.

Aims: The aim of the study was to measure eventual bismuth accumulation and neurological toxicity in patients prescribed BMT.

Methods: Patients initiating BMT for H. pylori between March 2014 and December 2015 were included. A blood sample was taken before first BMT intake and 24 h after the last intake, for assay of bismuth. A concentration > 50 μg/L was considered abnormal. Neurological complaints were assessed at inclusion, at the end of the 10-day treatment course, and 28 days later.

Results: 202 patients were included, of whom 190 took at least one dose of BMT, and 167 provided both required blood samples. Mean blood bismuth concentrations after the BMT course were 16.9 μg/L (95% confidence interval 15.6-18.3). Concentrations were > 50 μg/L (56.0 μg/L and 50.9 μg/L) in two elderly patients, one of whom presented mild, transient memory impairment during treatment. Non-serious neurological symptoms occurred in 20% of all patients and treatment failure was documented in 5% of patients.

Conclusions: In this study measuring blood bismuth concentrations in real-life practice, in < 1% of patients the BMT course resulted in blood bismuth concentrations > 50 μg/L. No serious neurological adverse events were observed.

Study Registration: EU-PAS register EUPAS3142 at www.encepp.eu ; ENCePP study seal.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40264-019-00821-6DOI Listing
August 2019

Functional classification of ATM variants in ataxia-telangiectasia patients.

Hum Mutat 2019 10 17;40(10):1713-1730. Epub 2019 May 17.

Institut Curie, PSL Research University, INSERM U830, Paris, France.

Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a recessive disorder caused by biallelic pathogenic variants of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). This disease is characterized by progressive ataxia, telangiectasia, immune deficiency, predisposition to malignancies, and radiosensitivity. However, hypomorphic variants may be discovered associated with very atypical phenotypes, raising the importance of evaluating their pathogenic effects. In this study, multiple functional analyses were performed on lymphoblastoid cell lines from 36 patients, comprising 49 ATM variants, 24 being of uncertain significance. Thirteen patients with atypical phenotype and presumably hypomorphic variants were of particular interest to test strength of functional analyses and to highlight discrepancies with typical patients. Western-blot combined with transcript analyses allowed the identification of one missing variant, confirmed suspected splice defects and revealed unsuspected minor transcripts. Subcellular localization analyses confirmed the low level and abnormal cytoplasmic localization of ATM for most A-T cell lines. Interestingly, atypical patients had lower kinase defect and less altered cell-cycle distribution after genotoxic stress than typical patients. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the pathogenic effects of the 49 variants, highlighted the strength of KAP1 phosphorylation test for pathogenicity assessment and allowed the establishment of the Ataxia-TeLangiectasia Atypical Score to predict atypical phenotype. Altogether, we propose strategies for ATM variant detection and classification.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.23778DOI Listing
October 2019

Evolution of brain atrophy subtypes during aging predicts long-term cognitive decline and future Alzheimer's clinical syndrome.

Neurobiol Aging 2019 07 22;79:22-29. Epub 2019 Mar 22.

EPHE, PSL, Bordeaux, France; Univ. Bordeaux, CNRS, UMR 5287, Institut de Neurosciences cognitives et intégratives d'Aquitaine, Bordeaux, France.

It is currently unknown whether brain atrophy subtypes defined in Alzheimer's disease are clinically relevant during aging. We investigated participants (n = 368) from a population-based cohort of nondemented older adults who received longitudinal neuropsychological assessments during 12 years. Magnetic resonance imaging scans at baseline and 4 years later were used to define participants with "hippocampal predominant atrophy," "cortical predominant atrophy," "homogenous atrophy," and "no evidence of brain subtype atrophy" based on the dynamics of hippocampal-to-cortical volume ratio evolution. After adjustment on age, gender, educational level, and ApoE4 genotype, participants with "hippocampal predominant atrophy" declined faster regarding global cognition, verbal fluency, and verbal episodic memory. In Cox proportional-hazards models, "hippocampal predominant atrophy" was associated with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's clinical syndrome over time (hazard ratio = 5.73; 95% CI 2.71-12.15), independently of age and ApoE4 genotype, the 2 other significant predictive factors. As a possible surrogate of confined tauopathy and early Alzheimer's disease pathology, future studies should consider the definition of "hippocampal predominant atrophy" based on hippocampal-to-cortical volume ratio evolution rather than hippocampal volume alone.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2019.03.006DOI Listing
July 2019

Dopamine transporter imaging for the diagnosis of multiple system atrophy cerebellar type.

Parkinsonism Relat Disord 2019 06 5;63:199-203. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Service de Neurologie, CRMR Atrophie Multisystématisée, CHU Bordeaux, 33000, Bordeaux, France; Univ. de Bordeaux, Institut des Maladies Neurodégénératives, UMR 5293, 33000, Bordeaux, France; CNRS, Institut des Maladies Neurodégénératives, UMR 5293, 33000, Bordeaux, France; Dept. of Medicine, University of Otago, Christchurch, and New Zealand Brain Research Institute, Christchurch, New Zealand. Electronic address:

Introduction: The added value of dopamine transporter SPECT (DAT-SPECT) for the diagnosis of "possible" multiple system atrophy of the cerebellar type (MSA-C) remains unknown.

Methods: We reviewed retrospectively the charts of 128 consecutive patients with a clinical diagnosis of MSA-C who were seen between 2007 and 2016 at the French Reference Center for MSA. The main objective was to evaluate the proportion of patients for whom the diagnosis of "possible" MSA-C was made because of a positive DAT-SPECT.

Results: Seventy-eight MSA-C patients had at least one DAT-SPECT. Fifty-nine of them were considered for the final analysis. In these, 22 had "possible" MSA-C and 23 "probable" MSA-C before DAT-SPECT, while 14 did not reach diagnosis criteria at that time. In those with "possible" MSA-C, DAT-SPECT was positive in 64%. In patients with "probable" MSA-C, 83% showed nigrostriatal denervation. Six out of 14 (43%) received a diagnosis of "possible" MSA-C because of positive DAT-SPECT. These patients had mean disease duration of 2.3 years at the time of DAT-SPECT compared to 3.5 years of the entire cohort of MSA-C patients with DAT-SPECT. Of the eight remaining, one had positive DAT-SPECT but also pons atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging, and seven progressed to "probable" MSA based on clinical features.

Conclusion: Our results suggest that DAT-SPECT significantly contributes to the diagnosis of "possible" MSA-C (43% of patients not reaching consensus diagnosis criteria before DAT-SPECT). DAT-SPECT seems especially useful in patients with shorter disease duration, while a negative result does not exclude a diagnosis of MSA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parkreldis.2019.02.006DOI Listing
June 2019

Acute toxic limbic encephalopathy following glyphosate intoxication.

Neurology 2019 03 8;92(11):534-536. Epub 2019 Feb 8.

From the Institut des Maladies Neurodégénératives (V.P., S.V., N.A., M.B., F.T.), CNRS UMR 5293; Université de Bordeaux (V.P., S.V., N.A., M.B., T.T., F.T.); CHU de Bordeaux (V.P., S.V., N.A., M.B., T.T., F.T.); and Neurocentre Magendie (T.T.), INSERM U1215, Bordeaux, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000007115DOI Listing
March 2019

Clinical Rating Scales for Urinary Symptoms in Parkinson Disease: Critique and Recommendations.

Mov Disord Clin Pract 2018 Sep-Oct;5(5):479-491. Epub 2018 Oct 25.

Department of Neurological Services Rush University School of Medicine Chicago IL USA.

Background: The prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) is high in Parkinson's disease (PD). These problems negatively affect quality of life and include both storage and voiding problems. The International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society established a task force to review clinical rating scales/questionnaires for the assessment of urinary symptoms in PD.

Methods: According to prespecified criteria, these scales/questionnaires were classified as "Recommended" or "Recommended with caveats" when clinimetric properties were satisfactory for Recommended status but had not been assessed specifically in PD, "Suggested" or "Listed." These assessments were applied to rate scales as screening tools for the diagnosis of LUTS and for the rating of symptom severity.

Results: Among scales that included LUTS but focused on overall autonomic or non-motor symptoms in PD, no scale reached the clinimetric rigor to be designated as Recommended or Recommended with caveats, but some were Suggested for either diagnostic screening tools or severity measures. Among primary urological scales, most are well validated in urological setting, but none was validated specifically in PD. DAN-PSS (Danish PSS), ICIQ (International Consultation for Incontinence Questionnaire)-MLUTS (Male Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms), OABq, OABq-SF (ICIQ-OABqol), OAB-V8 (as screening tool), and OABSS (OAB Symptom Score) met criteria for Recommended with caveats.

Conclusion: The Task Force does not recommend the development of a new scale. However, all above-mentioned questionnaires need to be studied further and specifically validated in PD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mdc3.12636DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6207119PMC
October 2018

Prodromal Alzheimer's Disease Demonstrates Increased Errors at a Simple and Automated Anti-Saccade Task.

J Alzheimers Dis 2018 ;65(4):1209-1223

Institute for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Clinical Branch, University and University Hospital of Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France.

Saccade alterations are potential early signs of Alzheimer's disease. However, uncertainty persists in how early and reliably automated saccade recording systems detect impairments. This multicenter pathophysiological case-control transversal study explored saccade execution in carefully diagnosed amnestic mild cognitive impairment patients fulfilling research criteria for prodromal Alzheimer's disease (n = 29), as compared to both aged-matched mild Alzheimer's disease patients (n = 23) and controls (n = 27). Auto-coded saccades from horizontal (gap) vertical (step) stimulus elicited pro-saccades, and anti-saccade (gap) tasks were compared across the 3 groups. Mild cognitive impairment patients committed significantly more anti-saccade errors compared to controls (46.9 versus 24.3%, p < 0.001). Conventional analyses of the auto-coded stimulus elicited saccades parameters did not distinguish the amnestic mild cognitive impairment from controls or the mild Alzheimer's disease group. However, an offline analysis of manually coded saccade latencies, using resampling statistics did reveal subtle differences among the groups. Analysis of the manually coded data revealed that the mild Alzheimer's disease group had a reliably larger self-corrected error-rate than in amnestic mild cognitive impairment and controls (p = 0.003). Analysis of the manually coded saccade latencies, using more sensitive lognormal bootstrap analysis revealed a continuum, from amnestic mild cognitive impairment to mild Alzheimer's disease, of an increased severity of impaired inhibition of stimulus elicited saccades and correct voluntary saccade initiation. Anti-saccade error rates and psychometric measures of executive and several other cognitive functions were moderately and negatively correlated. Overall, inhibitory impairments in stimulus elicited saccades, characteristic of Alzheimer's disease, may be detected early in presumed prodromal patients using a simple, automated anti-saccade task.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/JAD-180082DOI Listing
August 2019

Deep brain stimulation does not enhance neuroinflammation in multiple system atrophy.

Neurobiol Dis 2018 10 17;118:155-160. Epub 2018 Jul 17.

Univ. de Bordeaux, Institut des Maladies Neurodégénératives, UMR 5293, F-33000 Bordeaux, France; CNRS, Institut des Maladies Neurodégénératives, UMR 5293, F-33000 Bordeaux, France; Centre de Référence Maladie Rare AMS, CHU de Bordeaux, F-33000 Bordeaux, France; Service de Neurologie, CHU de Bordeaux, F-33000 Bordeaux, France. Electronic address:

Slowly progressive, levodopa-responsive multiple system atrophy (MSA) may be misdiagnosed as Parkinson's disease (PD). Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is mostly ineffective in these patients and may even worsen the clinical course. Here we assessed whether neuropathological differences between patients with MSA who were treated with DBS of the subthalamic nucleus because of a misleading clinical presentation and typical disease cases may explain the more benign disease course of the former, and also the rapid clinical decline after surgery. The post-mortem assessment included the subthalamic nucleus, the globus pallidus, the thalamus and the putamen in five patients with MSA who received DBS and nine typical disease cases. There was no evidence for distinct neuroinflammatory profiles between both groups that could be related to the surgical procedure or that could explain the rapid clinical progression during DBS. Patients who received deep brain stimulation displayed a higher proportion of α-synuclein bearing neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions in the putamen compared with typical cases, while the number of surviving neurons was not different between groups. Our findings suggest that DBS does not induce neuroinflammatory changes in patients with MSA, at least several years after the surgery. We further hypothesize that the peculiar pattern of α-synuclein pathology may contribute to differences in the clinical phenotype, with a greater proportion of neuronal inclusions in the putamen being associated to a milder, "PD-like" phenotype with sustained levodopa response and slower disease progression.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nbd.2018.07.016DOI Listing
October 2018

Are visual cues helpful for virtual spatial navigation and spatial memory in patients with mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer's disease?

Neuropsychology 2018 05;32(4):385-400

Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique.

Objective: To evaluate whether visual cues are helpful for virtual spatial navigation and memory in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

Method: 20 patients with AD, 18 patients with MCI and 20 age-matched healthy controls (HC) were included. Participants had to actively reproduce a path that included 5 intersections with one landmark at each intersection that they had seen previously during a learning phase. Three cueing conditions for navigation were offered: salient landmarks, directional arrows and a map. A path without additional visual stimuli served as control condition. Navigation time and number of trajectory mistakes were recorded.

Results: With the presence of directional arrows, no significant difference was found between groups concerning the number of trajectory mistakes and navigation time. The number of trajectory mistakes did not differ significantly between patients with AD and patients with MCI on the path with arrows, the path with salient landmarks and the path with a map. There were significant correlations between the number of trajectory mistakes under the arrow condition and executive tests, and between the number of trajectory mistakes under the salient landmark condition and memory tests.

Conclusion: Visual cueing such as directional arrows and salient landmarks appears helpful for spatial navigation and memory tasks in patients with AD and patients with MCI. This study opens new research avenues for neuro-rehabilitation, such as the use of augmented reality in real-life settings to support the navigational capabilities of patients with MCI and patients with AD. (PsycINFO Database Record
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/neu0000435DOI Listing
May 2018

Present and future of disease-modifying therapies in multiple system atrophy.

Auton Neurosci 2018 05 4;211:31-38. Epub 2018 Jan 4.

Univ. de Bordeaux, Institut des Maladies Neurodégénératives, UMR 5293, F-33000 Bordeaux, France; CNRS, Institut des Maladies Neurodégénératives, UMR 5293, F-33000 Bordeaux, France; Centre de Référence Maladie Rare AMS, Service de Neurologie, Hôpital Pellegrin, CHU de Bordeaux, F-33000 Bordeaux, France. Electronic address:

Through the last decade seven clinical trials on Multiple System Atrophy have been published, virtually all of them reported negative results. Patients and family remain hopeful while facing this devastating disease, but as doctors we still cannot offer them disease-modifying therapies. The field has seen many advances regarding pathophysiology, translational research, diagnostic accuracy, natural history and imaging, but successful treatment remains elusive. This review provides an overview of the available tools for designing clinical trials, critically analyzes the past studies and describes the knowledge obtained from them, and finally gives some orientation for future trials that could meet the current needs of patients and clinicians, overcoming the hurdles met by previous studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.autneu.2017.12.008DOI Listing
May 2018