Publications by authors named "François Lersy"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Inferior Colliculus's Hypermetabolism: A New Finding on Brain FDG PET and Perfusion MRI in a Patient With COVID-19.

Clin Nucl Med 2021 May;46(5):413-414

From the Service de Radiologie, Hôpital de Hautepierre, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg.

Abstract: We present the case of a 64-year-old man presenting an episode of confusion during SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) infection with a positive oropharyngeal swab polymerase chain reaction test. He was hospitalized for dyspnea related to pneumonia demonstrated on chest CT. FDG PET performed after the confusion phase, but still in the COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019)-positive phase, showed high glucose metabolism of the inferior colliculi. Morphological MRI was normal. The first-pass perfusion MRI shows hyperperfusion of the inferior colliculi, corresponding to FDG PET hypermetabolism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/RLU.0000000000003592DOI Listing
May 2021

Ocular MRI Findings in Patients with Severe COVID-19: A Retrospective Multicenter Observational Study.

Radiology 2021 Feb 16:204394. Epub 2021 Feb 16.

From the Department of Neuroradiology, Rothschild Foundation Hospital, Paris, France (A.L., F.H.); Department of Neuroradiology, CHU Lyon, Lyon, France (F.C.); Department of Neuroradiology, CHU Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France (F.L., S.K.).

COVID-19 may affect various organs. This paper reports 9 patients (1/9 [11%] woman and 8/9 [89%] men, mean age 56 ± 13 years) with globe MRI abnormalities obtained from a multicenter cohort of 129 patients presenting with severe COVID-19 from March 4th to May 1st, 2020. 9/129 (7%) patients had one or several FLAIR-WI hyperintense nodules of the posterior pole of the globe. All patients had nodules in the macular region, 8/9 (89%) had bilateral nodules, 2/9 (22%) had nodules outside the macular region. Screening of these patients might improve the management of potentially severe ophthalmological manifestations of the virus. See also the editorial by Kirsch.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2021204394DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7887777PMC
February 2021

Spontaneous infarction of lumbar roots, vertebrae and paravertebral muscles.

Am J Emerg Med 2021 Jan 28. Epub 2021 Jan 28.

Department of Radiology, University Hospital Strasbourg, France.

Ischemic injury to the lumbosacral nerve roots and plexus is a rare condition resulting from thrombosis of one or several lumbar arteries. As the arterial supply of the spine presents great variations between subjects, the clinical presentation of lumbar thrombosis is highly variable depending on the relative involvement of nerve roots, bones or muscles. Diagnosis can be challenging, especially in the acute phase, as different structures can be simultaneously involved. The identification of an enlarged vessel centered in the area of tissue damage can help with the final diagnosis. We present the case of a 59-year-old woman who presented with spontaneous incomplete cauda equina syndrome due to diffuse lumbar nerve root infarction. On imaging, acute lumbar artery thrombosis was confirmed, and in addition to nerve roots, adjacent vertebral and paraspinal muscle infarctions were also present.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2021.01.061DOI Listing
January 2021

Cerebral vasculitis of medium-sized vessels as a possible mechanism of brain damage in COVID-19 patients.

J Neuroradiol 2020 Dec 16. Epub 2020 Dec 16.

Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service d'imagerie 2, Hôpital de Hautepierre, Strasbourg, France; Engineering science, computer science and imaging laboratory (ICube), Integrative Multimodal Imaging in Healthcare, UMR 7357, University of Strasbourg-CNRS, Strasbourg, France. Electronic address:

Background And Purpose: Cerebral complications related to COVID-19 were recently reported, and the underlying mechanisms of brain damage remain uncertain, probably multifactorial. Among various hypotheses suggested, a possible vasculitis was issued but never confirmed. Herein, we aimed to describe brain MRIs focused on the intracranial vessel wall in a population of COVID-19 patients with neurologic manifestations.

Materials And Methods: Between March 1 and May 31, 2020, 69 consecutive COVID-19 patients with neurologic manifestations underwent a brain MRI allowing the study of the intracranial vessel wall at Strasbourg University hospitals and were retrospectively included. During the same period, 25 consecutive patients, without suspicion of SARS-CoV-2 infection, underwent a brain MRI urgently, with the same imaging protocols. A vasculitis seemed likely when imaging demonstrated vessel wall thickening with homogeneous and concentric enhancement.

Results: Among the 69 COVID-19 patients included, 11 (16%) presented arterial vessel wall thickening with homogeneous and concentric enhancement, compatible with cerebral vasculitis. These neuroimaging findings were not found among the 25 patients without SARS-CoV-2 infection, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.03). Middle cerebral arteries, basilar artery, and posterior cerebral arteries were the most frequent vessels involved. For nine of them, imaging demonstrated ischemic or hemorrhagic complications.

Conclusion: Cerebral vasculitis of medium-sized vessels seems to be one of the mechanisms at the origin of brain damage related to COVID-19.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurad.2020.11.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7833894PMC
December 2020

Inadequate Immune Humoral Response against JC Virus in Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy Non-Survivors.

Viruses 2020 12 2;12(12). Epub 2020 Dec 2.

Virology Laboratory, Strasbourg University Hospitals, 67000 Strasbourg, France.

JC virus (JCV) causes progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) in immunosuppressed patients. There is currently no effective specific antiviral treatment and PML management relies on immune restoration. Prognosis markers are crucially needed in this disease because of its high mortality rate. In this work, we investigated the compartmentalization of JCV strains as well as the humoral neutralizing response in various matrices to further understand the pathophysiology of PML and define markers of survival. Four patients were included, of which three died in the few months following PML onset. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) viral loads were the highest, with plasma samples having lower viral loads and urine samples being mostly negative. Whether at PML onset or during follow-up, neutralizing antibody (NAb) titers directed against the same autologous strain (genotype or mutant) were the highest in plasma, with CSF titers being on average 430-fold lower and urine titers 500-fold lower at the same timepoint. Plasma NAb titers against autologous genotype or mutant were lower in non-survivor patients, though no neutralization "blind spot" was observed. The surviving patient was followed up until nine months after PML onset and presented, at that time, an increase in neutralizing titers, from 38-fold against the autologous genotype to around 200-fold against PML mutants. Our results suggest that patients' humoral neutralizing response against their autologous strain may play a role in PML outcome, with survivors developing high NAb titers in both plasma and CSF.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/v12121380DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7761562PMC
December 2020

Cerebrospinal Fluid Features in Patients With Coronavirus Disease 2019 and Neurological Manifestations: Correlation with Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in 58 Patients.

J Infect Dis 2021 02;223(4):600-609

Service d'Imagerie, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France.

Background: Neurological manifestations are common in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), but little is known about pathophysiological mechanisms. In this single-center study, we examined neurological manifestations in 58 patients, including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis and neuroimaging findings.

Methods: The study included 58 patients with COVID-19 and neurological manifestations in whom severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction screening and on CSF analysis were performed. Clinical, laboratory, and brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging data were retrospectively collected and analyzed.

Results: Patients were mostly men (66%), with a median age of 62 years. Encephalopathy was frequent (81%), followed by pyramidal dysfunction (16%), seizures (10%), and headaches (5%). CSF protein and albumin levels were increased in 38% and 23%, respectively. A total of 40% of patients displayed an elevated albumin quotient, suggesting impaired blood-brain barrier integrity. CSF-specific immunoglobulin G oligoclonal band was found in 5 patients (11%), suggesting an intrathecal synthesis of immunoglobulin G, and 26 patients (55%) presented identical oligoclonal bands in serum and CSF. Four patients (7%) had a positive CSF SARS-CoV-2 reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Leptomeningeal enhancement was present on brain MR images in 20 patients (38%).

Conclusions: Brain MR imaging abnormalities, especially leptomeningeal enhancement, and increased inflammatory markers in CSF are frequent in patients with neurological manifestations related to COVID-19, whereas SARS-CoV-2 detection in CSF remained scanty.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiaa745DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7798956PMC
February 2021

Critical illness-associated cerebral microbleeds for patients with severe COVID-19: etiologic hypotheses.

J Neurol 2020 Nov 21. Epub 2020 Nov 21.

Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service d'imagerie 2, Hôpital de Hautepierre, 1 avenue Molière, 67200, Strasbourg, France.

Background And Purpose: During the COVID-19 outbreak, the presence of extensive white matter microhemorrhages was detected by brain MRIs. The goal of this study was to investigate the origin of this atypical hemorrhagic complication.

Methods: Between March 17 and May 18, 2020, 80 patients with severe COVID-19 infections were admitted for acute respiratory distress syndrome to intensive care units at the University Hospitals of Strasbourg for whom a brain MRI for neurologic manifestations was performed. 19 patients (24%) with diffuse microhemorrhages were compared to 18 control patients with COVID-19 and normal brain MRI.

Results: The first hypothesis was hypoxemia. The latter seemed very likely since respiratory failure was longer and more pronounced in patients with microhemorrhages (prolonged endotracheal intubation (p = 0.0002), higher FiO (p = 0.03), increased use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (p = 0.04)). A relevant hypothesis, the role of microangiopathy, was also considered, since patients with microhemorrhages presented a higher increase of the D-Dimers (p = 0.01) and a tendency to more frequent thrombotic events (p = 0.12). Another hypothesis tested was the role of kidney failure, which was more severe in the group with diffuse microhemorrhages (higher creatinine level [median of 293 µmol/L versus 112 µmol/L, p = 0.04] and more dialysis were introduced in this group during ICU stay [12 versus 5 patients, p = 0.04]).

Conclusions: Blood-brain barrier dysfunction secondary to hypoxemia and high concentration of uremic toxins seems to be the main mechanism leading to critical illness-associated cerebral microbleeds, and this complication remains to be frequently described in severe COVID-19 patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00415-020-10313-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7679237PMC
November 2020

A French case of porocephalosis diagnosed by radiologists.

J Infect Dev Ctries 2020 09 30;14(9):1071-1073. Epub 2020 Sep 30.

Department of neuroradiology, University hospitals of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France.

Porocephalosis is the name given to human infection by Armillifer, which is rare, especially in European and North American populations. Among the few cases reported to date, most of them were described in the African community. Humans can become infected, for example, consuming undercooked meat from infected snakes. Herein we report the case of a 31-year-old male, originally from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, who was living in France for many years and presented with lower back pain and mild abdominal pain. Imaging showed multiple comma-shaped calcifications disseminated in the liver and the peritoneal cavity, without any additional feature. The patient reported regular consumption of snake meat during his travels in Africa, and thus the diagnosis of porocephalosis could be made. Doctors treating patients from endemic areas or traveling in endemic areas, particularly in Africa, should become familiar with this infection and consider it in the case of multiple calcifications on imaging. More cases of porocephalosis are likely to be seen in the future because of the increase in international travel.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3855/jidc.12693DOI Listing
September 2020

Neurologic and neuroimaging findings in patients with COVID-19: A retrospective multicenter study.

Neurology 2020 09 17;95(13):e1868-e1882. Epub 2020 Jul 17.

From the Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg (S.K., F.L., S.B., F.-D.A., T.W.), Service d'imagerie 2, Hôpital de Hautepierre; Engineering Science, Computer Science and Imaging Laboratory (S.K., N.M.), UMR 7357, University of Strasbourg-CNRS; Service de Neurologie (M. Anheim), Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg; Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (M. Anheim), INSERM-U964/CNRS-UMR7104/Université de Strasbourg, Illkirch; Fédération de Médecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg (M. Anheim), Université de Strasbourg; Hôpitaux universitaires de Strasbourg (H.M., F.M., J.H.), Service de Médecine Intensive Réanimation, Nouvel Hôpital Civil; INSERM (French National Institute of Health and Medical Research) (H.M., F.M.), UMR 1260, Regenerative Nanomedicine, Fédération de Médecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg; Médecine Intensive-Réanimation (M.S., F.S.), Hôpital de Hautepierre, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg; Service de Neuroradiologie (H.O., F.B., J.M.), Hôpitaux Civils de Colmar; Service d'Imagerie (A. Khalil, A.G.), Unité de Neuroradiologie, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpital Bichat Claude Bernard; Université Paris Diderot (A. Khalil), Paris; Service de Neurologie (S. Carré, C.L.), Centre Hospitalier de Haguenau; Service de Radiologie (M. Alleg), Centre Hospitalier de Haguenau; Service de Neuroradiologie, (E.S., R.A., F.Z.) Hôpital Central, CHU de Nancy; CHIC Unisanté (L.J., P.N., Y.T.M.), Hôpital Marie Madeleine, Forbach; Neuroimaging Department (G.H., J. Benzakoun, C.O., G. Boulouis, M.E.-G., B.K.), GHU Paris Psychiatrie et Neurosciences, Hôpital Sainte-Anne, Université de Paris, INSERM U1266, F-75014; CHU Rennes (J.-C.F., B.C.-N.), Department of Neuroradiology; CHU Rennes (A.M.), Medical Intensive Care Unit; Department of Neuroradiology (P.-O.C., F.R., P.T.), University Hospital of Dijon, Hôpital François Mitterrand; Service de Radiologie (C.B.), CHU de Saint-Etienne; Service de Réanimation (X.F.), CH de Roanne; Service de Neuroradiologie (G.F., S.S.), CHU de Limoges; Radiology Department (I.d.B., G. Bornet), Hôpital Privé d'Antony; Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology (H.D.), University Hospital, Nantes; Neuroradiology Department (J. Berge), CHU de Bordeaux; Service de Neuroradiologie (A. Kazémi), CHU de Lille; Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris (N.P.), Service de Neuroradiologie, Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière; Sorbonne Université (N.P.), Univ Paris 06, UMR S 1127, CNRS UMR 7225, ICM, F-75013; Service de Neuroradiologie Diagnostique (A.L.), Foundation A. Rothschild Hospital, Paris; EA CHIMERE 7516 (J.-M.C.), Université de Picardie Jules Verne; Service de NeuroRadiologie, pôle Imagerie Médicale, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire d'Amiens; Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg (P.-E.Z., M.M.), UCIEC, Pôle d'Imagerie, Strasbourg; Observatoire Français de la Sclérose en Plaques (J.-C.B.), Lyon; Nephrology and Transplantation Department (S. Caillard), Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg; Inserm UMR S1109 (S. Caillard), LabEx Transplantex, Fédération de Médecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg; Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg (O.C., P.M.M.), Service d'Anesthésie-Réanimation, Nouvel Hôpital Civil; Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg (S.F.-K.), Laboratoire de Virologie Médicale; Radiology Department (M.O.), Nouvel Hôpital Civil, Strasbourg University Hospital; CHU de Strasbourg (N.M.), Service de Santé Publique, GMRC, F-67091 Strasbourg; Immuno-Rhumatologie Moléculaire (S.F.-K., J.H.), INSERM UMR_S1109, LabEx TRANSPLANTEX, Centre de Recherche d'Immunologie et d'Hématologie, Faculté de Médecine, Fédération Hospitalo-Universitaire OMICARE, Fédération de Médecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg; MRI Center (F.C.), Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Hospices Civils de Lyon; and Université Lyon 1 (F.C.), CREATIS-LRMN, CNRS/UMR/5220-INSERM U630, Villeurbanne, France.

Objective: To describe neuroimaging findings and to report the epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) with neurologic manifestations.

Methods: In this retrospective multicenter study (11 hospitals), we included 64 patients with confirmed COVID-19 with neurologic manifestations who underwent a brain MRI.

Results: The cohort included 43 men (67%) and 21 women (33%); their median age was 66 (range 20-92) years. Thirty-six (56%) brain MRIs were considered abnormal, possibly related to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus. Ischemic strokes (27%), leptomeningeal enhancement (17%), and encephalitis (13%) were the most frequent neuroimaging findings. Confusion (53%) was the most common neurologic manifestation, followed by impaired consciousness (39%), presence of clinical signs of corticospinal tract involvement (31%), agitation (31%), and headache (16%). The profile of patients experiencing ischemic stroke was different from that of other patients with abnormal brain imaging: the former less frequently had acute respiratory distress syndrome ( = 0.006) and more frequently had corticospinal tract signs ( = 0.02). Patients with encephalitis were younger ( = 0.007), whereas agitation was more frequent for patients with leptomeningeal enhancement ( = 0.009).

Conclusions: Patients with COVID-19 may develop a wide range of neurologic symptoms, which can be associated with severe and fatal complications such as ischemic stroke or encephalitis. In terms of meningoencephalitis involvement, even if a direct effect of the virus cannot be excluded, the pathophysiology seems to involve an immune or inflammatory process given the presence of signs of inflammation in both CSF and neuroimaging but the lack of virus in CSF.

Clinicaltrialsgov Identifier: NCT04368390.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000010112DOI Listing
September 2020

Signal changes in enhanced T1-weighted images related to gadolinium retention: A three-time-point imaging study.

J Neuroradiol 2021 Mar 30;48(2):82-87. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Service de Radiologie, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Hôpital de Hautepierre, 1 Avenue Molière, 67200 Strasbourg Cedex, France. Electronic address:

Background And Purpose: Concern has grown about the finding of gadolinium deposits in the brain after administering gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). The mechanism is unclear, and related questions remain unanswered, including the stability over time. Therefore, we conducted a three-time-point study to explore T1-weighted (W) signal changes in the dentate nucleus (DN) and globus pallidus (GP), after the first, fifth, and tenth injections of either a macrocyclic agent (gadoterate meglumine) or a linear agent (gadobenate dimeglumine).

Materials And Methods: For this retrospective, multicenter, longitudinal study, two groups of 18 (gadoterate meglumine) and 19 (gadobenate dimeglumine) patients were identified. The evolution of the signal over time was analyzed using DN/pons (DN/P) and GP/thalamus (GP/T) ratios.

Results: DN/P and GP/T ratios tended to increase after the fifth administration of gadobenate dimeglumine, following by a downward trend. A trend in a decrease in DN/P and GP/T ratios were found after the fifth and tenth administrations of gadoterate meglumine.

Conclusion: After exposure to gadobenate dimeglumine, the signal intensity (SI) tended to increase after the fifth injection owing to gadolinium accumulation, however, a SI increase was not found after the tenth administration supporting the hypothesis of a slow elimination of the previously retained gadolinium (wash-out effect) from the brain or of a change in form (by dechelation), causing the signal to fade. No increasing SI was found in the DN and GP after exclusive exposure to gadoterate meglumine, thus confirming its stability. We found, instead, a trend for a significative gadolinium elimination over time.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurad.2020.06.002DOI Listing
March 2021

Consensus Guidelines of the French Society of Neuroradiology (SFNR) on the use of Gadolinium-Based Contrast agents (GBCAs) and related MRI protocols in Neuroradiology.

J Neuroradiol 2020 Nov 18;47(6):441-449. Epub 2020 Jun 18.

MRI center, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France; Université Lyon 1, CREATIS-LRMN, CNRS/UMR/5220-INSERM U630, Villeurbanne, France.

Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are used in up to 35% of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations and are associated with an excellent safety profile. Nevertheless, two main issues have arisen in the last two decades: the risk of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and the risk of gadolinium deposition and retention. As a first step, this article reviews the different categories of GBCAs available in neuroradiology, their issues, and provides updates regarding the use of these agents in routine daily practice. Recent advances in MRI technology, as well as the development of new MRI sequences, have made GBCA injection avoidable in many indications, especially in patients with chronic diseases when iterative MRIs are required and when essential diagnostic information can be obtained without contrast enhancement. These recent advances also lead to changes in recommended MRI protocols. Thus, in a second step, this review focuses on consensus concerning brain MRI protocols in 10 common situations (acute ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, cerebral venous thrombosis, multiple sclerosis, chronic headache, intracranial infection, intra- and extra-axial brain tumors, vestibular schwannoma and pituitary adenoma). The latter allowing the standardization of practices in neuroradiology. Recommendations were also made concerning the use of GBCAs in neuroradiology, based on evidence in the literature and/or by consensus between the different coauthors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurad.2020.05.008DOI Listing
November 2020

Brain MRI Findings in Severe COVID-19: A Retrospective Observational Study.

Radiology 2020 11 16;297(2):E242-E251. Epub 2020 Jun 16.

From the Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service d'Imagerie 2, Hôpital de Hautepierre, Strasbourg, France (S.K.).

Background Brain MRI parenchymal signal abnormalities have been associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Purpose To describe the neuroimaging findings (excluding ischemic infarcts) in patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective study of patients evaluated from March 23, 2020, to April 27, 2020, at 16 hospitals. Inclusion criteria were () positive nasopharyngeal or lower respiratory tract reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assays, () severe COVID-19 infection defined as a requirement for hospitalization and oxygen therapy, () neurologic manifestations, and () abnormal brain MRI findings. Exclusion criteria were patients with missing or noncontributory data regarding brain MRI or brain MRI showing ischemic infarcts, cerebral venous thrombosis, or chronic lesions unrelated to the current event. Categorical data were compared using the Fisher exact test. Quantitative data were compared using the Student test or Wilcoxon test. < .05 represented a significant difference. Results Thirty men (81%) and seven women (19%) met the inclusion criteria, with a mean age of 61 years ± 12 (standard deviation) (age range, 8-78 years). The most common neurologic manifestations were alteration of consciousness (27 of 37, 73%), abnormal wakefulness when sedation was stopped (15 of 37, 41%), confusion (12 of 37, 32%), and agitation (seven of 37, 19%). The most frequent MRI findings were signal abnormalities located in the medial temporal lobe in 16 of 37 patients (43%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 27%, 59%), nonconfluent multifocal white matter hyperintense lesions seen with fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and diffusion-weighted sequences with variable enhancement, with associated hemorrhagic lesions in 11 of 37 patients (30%; 95% CI: 15%, 45%), and extensive and isolated white matter microhemorrhages in nine of 37 patients (24%; 95% CI: 10%, 38%). A majority of patients (20 of 37, 54%) had intracerebral hemorrhagic lesions with a more severe clinical presentation and a higher admission rate in intensive care units (20 of 20 patients [100%] vs 12 of 17 patients without hemorrhage [71%], = .01) and development of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (20 of 20 patients [100%] vs 11 of 17 patients [65%], = .005). Only one patient had SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the cerebrospinal fluid. Conclusion Patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 and without ischemic infarcts had a wide range of neurologic manifestations that were associated with abnormal brain MRI scans. Eight distinctive neuroradiologic patterns were described. © RSNA, 2020.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2020202222DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7301613PMC
November 2020