Publications by authors named "Folch-Ayora Ana"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Probiotic Supplements on Oncology Patients' Treatment-Related Side Effects: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 04 17;18(8). Epub 2021 Apr 17.

Faculty of Health Sciences, Pre-Department of Nursing, Jaume I University, Av. Sos Baynat, 12071 Castellon de la Plana, Spain.

Cancer affects more than 19.3 million people and has become the second leading cause of death worldwide. Chemo- and radiotherapy, the most common procedures in these patients, often produce unpleasant treatment-related side effects that have a direct impact on the quality of life of these patients. However, innovative therapeutic strategies such as probiotics are being implemented to manage these complications. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of probiotics supplements as a therapeutic strategy in adult oncology treatment-related side effects. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted in PubMed, Scielo, ProQuest and OVID databases up to and including January 2021, following the PRISMA guidelines. The quality of the included studies was assessed by the Jadad Scale. Twenty clinical trials published between 1988 and 2020 were included in this review. Seventeen studies (85%) revealed predominantly positive results when using probiotics to reduce the incidence of treatment-related side effects in oncology patients, while three studies (15%) reported no impact in their findings. This study sheds some light on the significance of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in altering the composition of gut microbiota, where probiotic strains may play an important role in preventing or mitigating treatment-related side effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18084265DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8074215PMC
April 2021

Self-Care and Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients with Drainage Enterostomy: A Multicenter, Cross Sectional Study.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 03 2;18(5). Epub 2021 Mar 2.

Department of Nursing, University CEU Cardenal Herrera, Alfara del Patriarca, 46115 Valencia, Spain.

The current article examined stoma self-care and health-related quality of life in patients with drainage enterostomy, described clinical and sociodemographic variables and analyzed the relationship between all of them. Trained interviewers collected data using a standardized form that queried sociodemographic and clinical variables. In addition, Self-Care (SC) was measured through a specific questionnaire for Ostomized Patients (CAESPO) and Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) through the Stoma Quality of Life questionnaire (S-QoL), which are not included in the electronic medical record. This was a multicenter, cross sectional study conducted in four hospitals of the province of Castellon (Spain), where 139 participants were studied. As novel findings, it was found that the level of SC of the stoma was high and was positively correlated with health-related quality of life. In relation to SC and sociodemographic variables studied in the research, women, married patients and active workers presented significantly higher scores than the rest. In relation to the clinical variables, we highlight the highest scores of the autonomous patients in the care of their stoma and those who used irrigations regularly. The lowest scores were the patients with complications in their stoma. We can highlight the validity and reliability of the CAESPO scale for biomedical and social research, and the importance of skills related to self-care of ostomy patients for a good level of HRQoL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052443DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7967580PMC
March 2021

"The COVID-19 outbreak"-An empirical phenomenological study on perceptions and psychosocial considerations surrounding the immediate incorporation of final-year Spanish nursing and medical students into the health system.

Nurse Educ Today 2020 Sep 12;92:104504. Epub 2020 Jun 12.

Faculty of Health Sciences, Jaime I University, Castellon, Spain. Electronic address:

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused an unprecedented health crisis worldwide, with the numbers of infections and deaths worldwide multiplying alarmingly in a matter of weeks. Accordingly, governments have been forced to take drastic actions such as the confinement of the population and the suspension of face-to-face teaching. In Spain, due to the collapse of the health system the government has been forced to take a series of important measures such as requesting the voluntary incorporation of final-year nursing and medical students into the health system. The objective of the present work is to study, using a phenomenological qualitative approach, the perceptions of students in this exceptional actual situation. A total of 62 interviews were carried out with final-year nursing and medicine students from Jaime I University (Spain), with 85% reporting having voluntarily joined the health system for ethical and moral reasons. Results from the inductive analysis of the descriptions highlighted two main categories and a total of five sub-categories. The main feelings collected regarding mood were negative, represented by uncertainty, nervousness, and fear. This study provides a description of the perceptions of final-year nursing and medical students with respect to their immediate incorporation into a health system aggravated by a global crisis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2020.104504DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7289744PMC
September 2020

Mobile applications in oncology: A systematic review of health science databases.

Int J Med Inform 2020 01 19;133:104001. Epub 2019 Oct 19.

Department of Nursing, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain.

Introduction: In recent years there has been an exponential growth in the number of mobile applications (apps) relating to the early diagnosis of cancer and prevention of side effects during cancer treatment. For health care professionals and users, it can thus be difficult to determine the most appropriate app for given needs and assess the level of scientific evidence supporting their use. Therefore, this review aims to examine the research studies that deal with this issue and determine the characteristics of the apps involved.

Methodology: This study involved a systematic review of the scientific literature on randomized clinical trials that use apps to improve cancer management among patients, using the Pubmed (Medline), Latin America and the Caribbean in Health Sciences (LILACS), and Cochrane databases. The search was limited to articles written in English and Spanish published in the last 10 years. A search of the App Store for iOS devices and Google Play for Android devices was performed to find the apps identified in the included research articles.

Results: In total, 54 articles were found to analyze the development of an application in the field of oncology. These articles were most frequently related to the use of apps for the early detection of cancer (n = 28), particularly melanoma (n = 9). In total, 21 studies reflected the application used. The apps featured in nine articles were located using the App Store and Google Play (n = 9), of which five were created to manage cancer-related issues. The rest of the apps were designed for use in the general population (n = 4).

Conclusions: There is an increasing number of research articles that study the use of apps in the field of oncology; however, these mobile applications tend to disappear from app stores after the studies are completed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2019.104001DOI Listing
January 2020

Comparative analysis of the psychometric parameters of two quality-of-life questionnaires, the SGRQ and CAT, in the assessment of patients with COPD exacerbations during hospitalization: A multicenter study.

Chron Respir Dis 2018 11 12;15(4):374-383. Epub 2018 Mar 12.

3 Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.

The aim of this study was to assess health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and to discuss the different tools available for its assessment. The most widely used assessments are the St. George respiratory questionnaire (SGRQ) and the COPD assessment test (CAT) questionnaire. Both have a different difficulty in exam completion, calculation, and scoring. No studies exist that analyze the validity and internal consistency of using both questionnaires on patients admitted to the hospital for a COPD exacerbation. A multicenter, cross-sectional analytic observational study of patients admitted to the hospital due to a COPD exacerbation (CIE 491.2). During their hospital stay, they were administered the SGRQ and the CAT questionnaire within the framework of a therapeutic education program (APRENDEPOC). Descriptive and comparative analysis, correlations between the scales (Pearson's correlation index), consistency and reliability calculations (Cronbach's α), and a forward stepwise multiple linear regression were performed, with significant correlations in both questionnaires considered p < 0.01 with the total scores. A statistical significance of p < 0.05 was assumed. Altogether, 231 patients were admitted for a COPD exacerbation ( n = 77) at Hospital Clínic of Barcelona (HCB) and ( n = 154) at Hospital Universitario General of Castellón (HUGC). The sample profile was not homogeneous between both centers, with significant differences in HRQL between hospitals. Correlation were noted between both scales ( p < 0.01), along with high levels of internal consistency and reliability (CAT 0.836 vs. SGRQ 0.827). The HRQL is related to dyspnea, wheezing, daytime drowsiness, and edema, as well as to the need to sleep in a sitting position, anxiety, depression, and dependence on others in the execution of daily activities. Our regression analysis showed that the SGRQ questionnaire could predict more changes in HRQL with a higher number of variables.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1479972318761645DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6234566PMC
November 2018

Participation of clinical nurses in the practical education of undergraduate nursing students.

Enferm Clin (Engl Ed) 2018 May - Jun;28(3):171-178. Epub 2017 Dec 11.

Departamento de Enfermería, Universidad de Alicante, San Vicent del Raspeig, Alicante, España.

Objective: To evaluate the level of participation of clinical nurses from Castellón where Universitat JaumeI nursing students do their clinical clerkship. To identify the variables that may influence clinical nurses' participation in students' clinical mentorship.

Method: This observational, cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted by applying the validated Involvement, Motivation, Satisfaction, Obstacles and Commitment (IMSOC) questionnaire. The variables collected were: age, work environment and previous training. The study was conducted between January and December 2014.

Results: The sample included 117 nurses. The overall mean questionnaire score was 122.838 (standard deviation: ±18.692; interquartile range 95%: 119.415-126.26). The variable "previous training for mentorship students" was statistically significant in the overall score and for all dimensions (P<.05). Primary care nurses obtained better scores in the dimension Implication than professionals working at other care levels.

Conclusions: The level of participation of the clinical nurses from Castellón is adequate. The previous training that professionals receive for mentoring students improves both their level of participation and primary care level. Extending this research to other national and international environments is recommended.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.enfcli.2017.11.003DOI Listing
January 2019