Publications by authors named "Fleur Duane"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A mental health issue that does not discriminate.

Authors:
Fleur Duane

Aust Nurs Midwifery J 2014 Jun;21(11):40

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June 2014

A journey--but where is the start line?

Aust Nurs Midwifery J 2014 Feb;21(7):36-7

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February 2014

The role of a clinical nurse consultant dementia specialist: A qualitative evaluation.

Dementia (London) 2015 Jul 27;14(4):436-49. Epub 2013 Aug 27.

Royal District Nursing Service, RDNS Institute, St Kilda, Victoria, Australia.

Delay in diagnosis and difficulties in accessing appropriate health care services plague dementia care delivery in the community setting, potentiating the risk for misdiagnosis, inappropriate management, poor psychological adjustment and reduced coping capacity and ability to forward plan. We evaluated a clinical nurse consultant role with a speciality in dementia to provide person-centred pre-diagnosis support in the community. Clients, with a six-month history of cognitive and functional decline in the absence of delirium but no formal diagnosis of dementia, were recruited from a Home Care Nursing Service and an Aged Care Assessment Service located in the Western Suburbs of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. The role of a clinical nurse consultant was highly regarded by clients and other health professionals. This paper discussing the CNC role and the outcomes of the role suggests it was successful in providing timely assistance and support for consumers and support for other health professionals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1471301213498759DOI Listing
July 2015

Medication management: the perspectives of people with dementia and family carers.

Dementia (London) 2013 Nov 16;12(6):734-50. Epub 2012 Apr 16.

Alzheimer's Australia Victoria, Australia.

The safe self management of medicines will be affected by the presence of dementia. A qualitative study using grounded theory was undertaken by a community nursing organisation in Melbourne, Australia, in order to develop a strength-based and person-centred approach to the assessment of medication ability. The perspectives of the person with dementia and their carers were explored to see if there were any significant differences in their medication management experiences when compared to those of older adults without dementia and their carers. People with dementia are able to sustain self management of their medicines using established routines and strategies. As cognitive changes affect short-term memory, external strategies and task allocation to family members are introduced by the individual to support their continuing independence. The family member assumed the carer role as their concern for medication safety increased, but this role engendered stress and a burden that was unacknowledged by the health professional.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1471301212444056DOI Listing
November 2013

Living alone with dementia.

Dementia (London) 2013 Jan 16;12(1):123-36. Epub 2011 Oct 16.

RDNS The Helen Macpherson Smith Institute of Community Health, Australia.

This paper details the findings of an exploratory study undertaken in 2009 into the older population who live alone with dementia, as part of a wider study into the phenomenon of living alone in older age with a cognitive impairment or early stage dementia. Interviews were undertaken with 19 older people who live alone with cognitive impairment or early stage dementia, and field notes were taken during interview visits. Throughout this paper, older people who live alone with a cognitive impairment or dementia who participated in the study will be referred to by pseudonym. Overall, the findings give insight into the lives of these people and how they remain connected to and supported by others. These findings will contribute to the knowledge of this group, which may be considered in future research and service delivery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1471301211420331DOI Listing
January 2013
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