Publications by authors named "Fiona McL Collier"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

MERP1: a mammalian ependymin-related protein gene differentially expressed in hematopoietic cells.

Gene 2002 Mar;286(2):249-57

Stem Cell Laboratory, The Douglas Hocking Research Institute, Barwon Health, The Geelong Hospital, Geelong, VIC, 3220, Australia.

We have utilized differential display polymerase chain reaction to investigate the gene expression of hematopoietic progenitor cells from adult bone marrow and umbilical cord blood. A differentially expressed gene was identified in CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells, with low expression in CD34- cells. We have obtained the full coding sequence of this gene which we designated human mammalian ependymin-related protein 1 (MERP1). Expression of MERP1 was found in a variety of normal human tissues, and is 4- and 10-fold higher in adult bone marrow and umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells, respectively, compared to CD34- cells. Additionally, MERP1 expression in a hematopoietic stem cell enriched population was down-regulated with proliferation and differentiation. Conceptual translation of the MERP1 open reading frame reveals significant homology to two families of glycoprotein calcium-dependant cell adhesion molecules: ependymins and protocadherins.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0378-1119(02)00434-1DOI Listing
March 2002

Leptin inhibits osteoclast generation.

J Bone Miner Res 2002 Feb;17(2):200-9

Department of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences: Barwon Health, The Geelong Hospital, The University of Melbourne, Australia.

Originally, leptin was described as a product of adipocytes that acts on the hypothalamus to regulate appetite. However, subsequently, it has been shown that leptin receptors are distributed widely and that leptin has diverse functions, including promotion of hemopoietic and osteoblastic differentiation. It has been recognized for some time that both serum leptin and bone mass are correlated positively to body fat mass and, recently, we have shown a direct positive relationship between serum leptin and bone mass in nonobese women. We now report that leptin inhibits osteoclast generation in cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and murine spleen cells incubated on bone in the presence of human macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hM-CSF) and human soluble receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (sRANKL). The half-maximal concentration inhibitory of leptin was approximately 20 nM in the presence of sRANKL at 40 ng/ml but decreased to approximately 2 nM when sRANKL was used at 5 ng/ml. The majority of the inhibitory effect occurred in the first week of the 3-week cultures. Inhibition did not occur when the PBMC cultures were washed vigorously to remove nonadherent cells or when purified CD14+ monocytes were used to generate osteoclasts, indicating an indirect or permissive effect via CD14- PBMC. Leptin increased osteoprotegerin (OPG) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression in PBMC but not in CD14+ cells, suggesting that the inhibitory effect may be mediated by the RANKL/RANK/OPG system. Leptin may act locally to increase bone mass and may contribute to linkage of bone formation and resorption.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1359/jbmr.2002.17.2.200DOI Listing
February 2002