Publications by authors named "Filippo Maria Nimbi"

11 Publications

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The relation between sexuality and obesity: the role of psychological factors in a sample of obese men undergoing bariatric surgery.

Int J Impot Res 2020 Dec 17. Epub 2020 Dec 17.

Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Sapienza University of Rome, Latina, Italy.

Obesity produces a significant deterioration in general and sexual health. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the impact of obesity on sexuality, illustrating the psychological constructs that may play a significant role in determining sexual functioning and satisfaction. During the psychological assessment for bariatric surgery eligibility, 171 obese men filled out a socio-demographic questionnaire, the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), the 20 Item-Toronto Alexithymia Scale, the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised, the Body Uneasiness Test, and the Obesity-related Disability test. A series of hierarchical multiple regression analyses highlighted how obese men sexual desire (F = 10.128, p < 0.001), erectile function (F = 63.578, p < 0.001), orgasmic function (F = 33.967, p < 0.001), intercourse satisfaction (F = 159.752, p < 0.001), and general satisfaction (F = 18.707, p < 0.001) were significantly associated with other IIEF sexual domains, difficulties in identifying feelings, psychopathological symptoms (such as depression and paranoid ideation), body image, and quality of life. Findings are useful for deepening understanding of obese male sexual response, and more generally, for analyzing the complex and multivariate relation between obesity and sexuality, supporting the need of a multidisciplinary approach to obesity care that includes professionals with specific training in sexology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41443-020-00388-2DOI Listing
December 2020

Can Physical and/or Sexual Abuse Play a Role in the Female Choice of a Partner? A Cross-Sectional, Correlational Pilot Study.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2020 09 21;17(18). Epub 2020 Sep 21.

Chair of Endocrinology and Medical Sexology (ENDOSEX), Department of Systems Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, 00133 Rome, Italy.

The present study aims to evaluate the relationship in women between a history of physical/sexual abuse and the preferences regarding the choice of a partner for a short/long-term relationship in terms of male facial dimorphism, and to assess their sexual functioning. We enrolled 48 abused women and 60 non-abused women. Facial preferences were evaluated with the Morphing test. Sexual functioning was measured with the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). Regarding the choice for a short-term partner, abused and non-abused women did not show any differences, and both groups chose a less masculine male face. On the other hand, regarding the choice for a long-term partner, abused women showed a preference for an average male face, whilst non-abused women preferred a less masculine face. The sexual functioning of abused women was found significantly dysfunctional in all domains of the FSFI. These data, generated from a small but highly selected cohort, demonstrated that physical/sexual abuse may be associated with a more rational and conscious choice of a male partner for a long-term relationship, but not with an instinctive one, as the choice of an occasional partner. In addition, the sexual functioning of abused women appears to be compromised by the traumatic experience.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186902DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7558269PMC
September 2020

Chemsex in Italy: Experiences of Men Who Have Sex With Men Consuming Illicit Drugs to Enhance and Prolong Their Sexual Activity.

J Sex Med 2020 10 26;17(10):1875-1884. Epub 2020 Jul 26.

Department of Dynamic and Clinical Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.

Background: Chemsex is a novel phenomenon referring to the consumption of illicit drugs to facilitate, enhance, and prolong the sexual experience in men who have sex with men (MSM).

Aim: The present study aims to investigate contexts, patterns of substance use, first chemsex experience, and harm reduction in a group of MSM practicing chemsex in Italy.

Methods: Thirty MSM involved in chemsex activities were interviewed between February and July 2019.

Outcomes: The interviews were conducted using an ad hoc grid exploring general characteristics of Italian chemsex, patterns of substance use, first chemsex experience, and harm reduction opinions.

Results: Chemsex in Italy showed important peculiarities and patterns because of sociocultural background. Chemsex was mainly reported in private venues within couple and group sexual activities. Most participants attended chemsex sessions about 1-2 times per month often concurring with men-only club events. Freebase cocaine emerged among the most relevant substances consumed together with gamma-hydroxybutyrate/gamma-butyrolactone, crystal methamphetamine, and mephedrone. A rare use of injected substances compared with other European Union countries was shown. Given the high prevalence of erectile problems, a large use of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors was reported, and noncoital sexual activities were usually preferred (eg, oral sex, fist fucking). The first chemsex experiences were usually accessed by geolocation-based dating apps and sexual partners and were generally described as positive experiences, with some negative consequences at the end of the session (dysphoric mental states, guilt, craving). Taking part in international gay events seems to favor the first experience of chemsex for some participants. Moreover, some MSM practiced chemsex only abroad or in other cities in Italy so as not to be recognized as chem users in their daily environment.

Clinical Translation: Implications for ad hoc harm reduction programs are discussed.

Strengths & Limitations: Despite the methodological limitations due to participants' number and the absence of interviews audio recording, results highlighted some relevant characteristics of chemsex in Italy, such as freebase cocaine use, attitudes regarding slamming, geographical movements, and secrecy.

Conclusion: The results revealed a need for greater scientific and public attention on chemsex to act with the most specific and effective prevention and harm reduction tools. Nimbi FM, Rosati F, Esposito RM, et al. Chemsex in Italy: Experiences of Men Who Have Sex With Men Consuming Illicit Drugs to Enhance and Prolong Their Sexual Activity. J Sex Med 2020;17:1875-1884.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsxm.2020.07.001DOI Listing
October 2020

Genital Pain and Sexual Functioning: Effects on Sexual Experience, Psychological Health, and Quality of Life.

J Sex Med 2020 04 13;17(4):771-783. Epub 2020 Feb 13.

Department of Dynamic and Clinical Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; Institute of Clinical Sexology, Rome, Italy.

Background: Genital pain (GP) is a common symptom in women of reproductive age. The prevalence of GP is difficult to gauge as it has been underreported by both patients and clinicians and neglected in clinical studies despite wide recognition of the adverse effects to women's health.

Aim: The purpose of the present study was 3-fold: (i) to explore the self-reported presence and perception of GP and its association with sexual functioning, sexual distress, emotions, psychopathology, and quality of life (QoL); (ii) to explore if, controlling for the pain effect, women with Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) scores indicating sexual dysfunction also reported worse outcomes regarding sexual distress, emotions, psychological health, and QoL than GP women with higher FSFI scores; and (iii) to evaluate the effects of GP duration, comparing women with GP with shorter (<6 months) duration of symptoms with women with longer (≥6 months) duration of symptom of GP on sexual functioning, distress, emotions, psychopathology and QoL.

Methods: A total of 1,034 women (age ranges between 18 and 40 years) from the Italian general population completed a web survey on sexual health.

Outcomes: 6 self-report questionnaires exploring different biopsychosocial factors were assessed: the FSFI, the Female Sexual Distress Scale, the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, the Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire adapted for GP, the Short Form 36, and the Symptom Check List-90-Revised.

Results: Women who reported GP (n = 319) indicated generally lower sexual function than women without GP (n = 648; P = .036). They reported a higher level of sexual distress (P < .001), more negative emotions related to sexual experiences (P = .001), lower scores in all QoL domains (P < .001), and higher levels of psychopathological symptoms (P < .001). Controlling for pain effects, women whose FSFI scores indicated sexual dysfunction (n = 150) reported higher rates of sexual distress than women whose FSFI scores indicated normal sexual function (n = 169; P < .001). The scores also indicated fewer positive (P < .001) and more negative emotions (P < .001) related to sexuality, lower QoL (P < .001) and significantly higher psychological burden (P < .001). Moreover, women experiencing GP for ≥6 months reported significantly lower means on the FSFI total score (P < .05; especially in the desire, satisfaction, and pain domains), distress (P < .001), and emotions (P < .05) than women experiencing GP duration <6 months. No significant differences were found on the QoL and the psychopathological symptoms.

Clinical Implications: GP is significantly pervasive, but a high percentage of sexual problems and related emotional suffering is overlooked. Raising awareness about this issue is critical, both among clinicians and the general public.

Strengths & Limitations: The present study highlighted important characteristics of GP from a community sample; the results indicate problems related to pain experiences and their repercussions on sexual, psychological, affective health, and QoL. Major limitations are related to the use of self-report measures via a web-based study.

Conclusion: The results provide evidence of a lack of awareness regarding pain experiences as they relate to sexual functioning in women; clinicians would be advised to more fully investigate sexual functioning and psychosocial variables associated with GP during routine consultation beginning with the first onset of the symptoms. Nimbi FM, Rossi V, Tripodi F, et al. Genital Pain and Sexual Functioning: Effects on Sexual Experience, Psychological Health, and Quality of Life. J Sex Med 2020; 17:771-783.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsxm.2020.01.014DOI Listing
April 2020

A Biopsychosocial Model for the Counseling of Hormonal Contraceptives: A Review of the Psychological, Relational, Sexual, and Cultural Elements Involved in the Choice of Contraceptive Method.

Sex Med Rev 2019 10 24;7(4):587-596. Epub 2019 Jul 24.

Institute of Clinical Sexology, Rome, Italy; Department of Dynamic and Clinical Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.

Introduction: Hormonal contraceptives are among the most popular contraceptives used by women worldwide. Long-term adherence may vary significantly among users because of fear of side effects, unhealthy habits, and lack of knowledge, despite their proven effectiveness.

Aim: To analyze the psychological, relational, sexual, and cultural factors associated with choice and use of hormonal contraceptives. We highlight the importance of a biopsychosocial approach to contraceptive counseling.

Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted in September 2018.

Main Outcome Measures: 99 articles published in Google Scholar, Web of Science, Scopus, EBSCO, and the Cochrane Library about counseling to hormonal contraception and related biopsychosocial factors were reviewed.

Results: In the current work, we have analyzed a broad range of factors involved in the contraceptive choice among psychological, relational, sexual, and cultural spheres under the umbrella of the biopsychosocial model. The literature has highlighted that counseling provided by a specialized health care professional may help women in selecting a contraceptive method that best suits their personal needs and lifestyles, maximizing compliance and well-being.

Conclusion: The importance of psychological, relational, sexual and cultural aspects involved in the selection of a contraceptive should be acknowledged by health care professionals and addressed during individualized counseling to ensure that the option selected and offered is tailored to the personal preferences, lifestyle, and practices of each woman. Nimbi FM, Rossi R, Tripodi F, et al. A Biopsychosocial Model for the Counseling of Hormonal Contraceptives: A Review of the Psychological, Relational, Sexual, and Cultural Elements Involved in the Choice of Contraceptive Method. Sex Med Rev 2019;7:587-596.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sxmr.2019.06.005DOI Listing
October 2019

Male Sexual Desire: An Overview of Biological, Psychological, Sexual, Relational, and Cultural Factors Influencing Desire.

Sex Med Rev 2020 01 22;8(1):59-91. Epub 2019 Feb 22.

Department of Dynamic and Clinical Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; Institute of Clinical Sexology, Rome, Italy.

Introduction: The literature showed the need for a better understanding of the male sexual response, which has historically been considered as simpler and more mechanistic compared with that in women.

Aim: To examine the literature on biopsychosocial factors associated with the level of sexual desire in men and discuss some interesting directions for future research.

Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted.

Main Outcome Measures: 169 articles published in Google Scholar, Web of Science, Scopus, EBSCO, and Cochrane Library about male sexual desire and related biopsychosocial factors.

Results: We found a lack of multidimensional studies on male sexual desire. Most existing research has focused on hypoactive sexual desire disorder in coupled heterosexual men. Biological factors play important roles in the level of sexual desire, but they are insufficient to explain the male sexual response. Psychological, relational, and sexual factors (eg depression, anxiety, emotions, attraction, conflicts, communication, sexual functioning, distress, satisfaction) are involved in the development/maintenance of lack of sexual interest in men. Cultural influence is also relevant, with cognitive factors linked to gender roles and sexual scripts of masculinity identified as important predictors of low sexual desire.

Conclusion: Male sexual desire is characterized by an interplay among biological, psychological, sexual, relational, and cultural elements. This interplay merits further study to better understand how sexual desire works and how treatments for low sexual interest could be improved. Nimbi FM,Tripodi F, Rossi R, et al. Male Sexual Desire: An Overview of Biological, Psychological, Sexual, Relational, and Cultural Factors Influencing Desire. Sex Med Rev 2020;8:59-91.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sxmr.2018.12.002DOI Listing
January 2020

Are Role and Gender Related to Sexual Function and Satisfaction in Men and Women Practicing BDSM?

J Sex Med 2019 03 14;16(3):463-473. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Institute of Clinical Sexology, Rome, Italy; Department of Dynamic and Clinical Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.

Background: Published studies show good psychological health of people involved in bondage-discipline, dominance-submission, and sadism-masochism (BDSM) activities; nevertheless, there are few studies on characteristics related to gender, role in the BDSM scene, sexual functioning, and satisfaction among BDSM practitioners.

Aim: The aim of this study was to explore gender and role differences, prevalence of sexual complaints, related distress, and sexual satisfaction in BDSM participants compared with the general population.

Methods: A group of 266 Italian consensual BDSM participants (141 men and 125 women) were recruited with a snowball sampling technique. An anonymous protocol, including self-reported ad hoc and validated questionnaires, was used. The control group was composed of 100 men and 100 women who were not significantly different from the BDSM group for the sociodemographic data and were randomly extracted from an Italian database on sexual functioning of the general population.

Main Outcome Measures: Self-reported demographic factors, including favorite and most frequent BDSM practices, the Sexual Complaint Screener, and the Sexual Satisfaction Scale, were completed by the participants.

Results: The mean age of the BDSM group was 41.42 ± 9.61 years old (range 18-74). Data showed a varied outlook of practices, fantasies, rules, and roles. With regard to concerns about BDSM activities (fantasies and behaviors), participants reported a very low self-declared degree of distress. The dominant and switch groups appear to be more satisfied and less concerned about sexuality than the general population and the submissive group. Role in the BDSM scene was the only significant predictor of sexual satisfaction, showing a medium effect size.

Clinical Implications: Results from this study could be helpful to inform sexual health care professionals and to reduce the stigma related to the BDSM population.

Strengths & Limitations: In general, this study may help to describe better some characteristics related to gender, role, sexual preferences, function, and satisfaction. The main limitation regards the sampling method, which does not allow us to consider the group as representative of BDSM participants in general.

Conclusion: Data showed a varied outlook of practices, fantasies, rules, and roles in both BDSM men and women. BDSM participants (especially dominant and switch groups) appear to be more satisfied and less concerned about sexuality than the general population. This is an attempt to increase the attention of researchers and health care professionals to this important topic and to improve the care provided to people with specific preferences and behaviors. Botta D, Nimbi FM, Tripodi F, et al. Are Role and Gender Related to Sexual Function and Satisfaction in Men and Women Practicing BDSM? J Sex Med 2019;16:463-473.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsxm.2019.01.001DOI Listing
March 2019

Which psychosocial variables affect drive the most? Analysis of sexual desire in a group of Italian men.

Int J Impot Res 2019 Nov 11;31(6):410-423. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Dynamic and Clinical Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Via dei Marsi 78, 00185, Rome, Italy.

Literature lacks wide studies on variables affecting sexual desire in men. Aim of this study was to explore the role of some psychosocial variables such as quality of life, sexual function, distress, sexual satisfaction, psychological symptoms, emotions, alexithymia, couple adjustment, sexism, dysfunctional beliefs, cognitive schemas, and modes. A self-administered survey reached 450 heterosexual Italian men (age 31.36 ± 10.73). Results showed "orgasmic function", "lack of erotic thoughts", "erection concerns thoughts", "hostile sexism", and "positive affect" as the main sexual desire predictors. "Depression", "premature ejaculation severity", "sexual distress", "sexual conservatism", and "helpless" predicted in minor manner sexual desire levels. Analyzed variables could represent key factors in the assessment and therapy of sexual desire problems.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41443-018-0105-8DOI Listing
November 2019

Testing a Conceptual Model for Men's Sexual Desire Referring to Automatic Thoughts, Emotions, Sexual Function, and Sexism.

J Sex Med 2018 11;15(11):1518-1526

Department of Dynamic and Clinical Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; Institute of Clinical Sexology, Rome, Italy.

Introduction: Literature lacks biopsychosocial models of men's sexuality. Regarding sexual desire, Carvalho and Nobre (J Sex Med 2011;8:754-763.) presented a cognitive-affective model including age, medical factors, dyadic adjustment, psychopathology, restrictive attitudes toward sexual activity, erection concerns, lack of erotic thoughts (LET), sadness, and shame as predictors. In particular, automatic thoughts were highlighted as the main predictors of sexual desire in men.

Aim: To test a conceptual model (confronting full and partial mediation) considering the interrelated role of automatic thoughts, emotional factors, sexual function, and sexism in influencing the levels of men's sexual desire.

Methods: Selected variables were the best predictors of men's sexual desire in a previous study on 450 heterosexual Italian men (age 31.36 ± 10.73 years). Path diagrams were built including "orgasmic function," "LET," "erection concerns thoughts" (ECT), "hostile sexism," and "positive affect" as predictors of sexual desire. The 2 versions of the model were designed as a "partial" and a "full mediation" from automatic thoughts toward desire. ECT and LET were selected as main predictors, with direct paths going from ECT to positive affect and sexual desire, and from LET to positive affect, orgasmic function, and sexual desire. Direct paths were also drawn from emotions and orgasm to sexual desire. Moreover, in the partial mediation model, part of ECT and LET effect was mediated by emotions and orgasm, and part directly influenced sexual desire. Hostile sexism and sociodemographic variables were considered as exogenous variables influencing sexual desire. Path analyses were performed through structural equation modeling approach.

Main Outcome Measure: Results from 4 standardized questionnaires and sociodemographic information were considered for this study: International Index of Erectile Function, Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, Ambivalent Sexism Inventory, and Sexual Modes Questionnaire.

Results: Results showed a satisfactory data fit for both versions, but the partial mediation model was retained (χ = 35.312, degree of freedom = 34, P = .406; goodness of fit = .987; normed fit index = .945; comparative fit index = .998; root mean square error of approximation = .009 [95% CI .000-.036]). All the endogenous paths and hostile sexism were found to be significant.

Clinical Implications: The model selected could suggest the need to operate under an biopsychosocial approach, considering cognitive, emotional, and sexual aspects all together to elicit an effective arise of sexual desire level.

Strength & Limitations: The study can claim a good methodology and the proposal of an interesting model, even if the results should be carefully interpreted due to the use of no representative sample, self-report measures, and the limited number of variables involved.

Conclusion: Our findings suggest that cognitive, emotional, sexual functioning, and cultural variables interplay affecting men's sexual interest. Nimbi FM, Tripodi F, Rossi R, et al. Testing a Conceptual Model for Men's Sexual Desire Referring to Automatic Thoughts, Emotions, Sexual Function, and Sexism. J Sex Med 2018;15:1518-1526.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsxm.2018.09.008DOI Listing
November 2018

Sexual Modes Questionnaire (SMQ): Translation and Psychometric Properties of the Italian Version of the Automatic Thought Scale.

J Sex Med 2018 03;15(3):396-409

Faculdade de Psicologia e de Ciências da Educação da Universidade do Porto, Laboratório de Investigação em Sexualidade Humana (SexLab), Porto, Portugal.

Background: The Sexual Modes Questionnaire (SMQ) is a validated and widespread used tool to assess the association among negative automatic thoughts, emotions, and sexual response during sexual activity in men and women.

Aim: To test the psychometric characteristics of the Italian version of the SMQ focusing on the Automatic Thoughts subscale (SMQ-AT).

Methods: After linguistic translation, the psychometric properties (internal consistency, construct, and discriminant validity) were evaluated. 1,051 participants (425 men and 626 women, 776 healthy and 275 clinical groups complaining about sexual problems) participated in the present study.

Outcomes: 2 confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to test the fit of the original factor structures of the SMQ versions. In addition, 2 principal component analyses were performed to highlight 2 new factorial structures that were further validated with confirmatory factor analyses. Cronbach α and composite reliability were used as internal consistency measures and differences between clinical and control groups were run to test the discriminant validity for the male and female versions. The associations with emotions and sexual functioning measures also are reported.

Results: Principal component analyses identified 5 factors in the male version: erection concerns thoughts, lack of erotic thoughts, age- and body-related thoughts, negative thoughts toward sex, and worries about partner's evaluation and failure anticipation thoughts. In the female version 6 factors were found: sexual abuse thoughts, lack of erotic thoughts, low self-body image thoughts, failure and disengagement thoughts, sexual passivity and control, and partner's lack of affection. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the adequacy of the factor structure for men and women. Moreover, the SMQ showed a strong association with emotional response and sexual functioning, differentiating between clinical and control groups.

Clinical Translation: This measure is useful to evaluate patients and design interventions focused on negative automatic thoughts during sexual activity and to develop multicultural research.

Strengths And Limitations: This study reports on the translation and validation of the Italian version of a clinically useful and widely used measure (assessing automatic thoughts during sexual activity). Limits regarding sampling technique and use of the Automatic Thoughts subscale are discussed in the article.

Conclusion: The present findings support the validity and the internal consistency of the Italian version of the SMQ-AT and allow the assessment of negative automatic thoughts during sexual activity for clinical and research purposes. Nimbi FM, Tripodi F, Simonelli C, Nobre P. Sexual Modes Questionnaire (SMQ): Translation and Psychometric Properties of the Italian Version of the Automatic Thought Scale. J Sex Med 2018;15:396-409.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsxm.2018.01.002DOI Listing
March 2018

Expanding the Analysis of Psychosocial Factors of Sexual Desire in Men.

J Sex Med 2018 02 29;15(2):230-244. Epub 2017 Dec 29.

Department of Dynamic and Clinical Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; Institute of Clinical Sexology, Rome, Italy.

Background: The literature lacks studies of the male sex drive. Most existing studies have focused on hypoactive sexual desire disorder in coupled heterosexual men, highlighting some of the main related biological, psychological, and social factors.

Aim: To evaluate the role of selected psychological and social variables affecting male sexual desire such as quality of life, sexual function, distress, satisfaction, psychological symptoms, emotions, alexithymia, couple adjustment, sexism, cognitive schemas activated in a sexual context, sexual dysfunctional beliefs, and different classes of cognitions triggered during sexual activity about failure anticipation, erection concerns, age- and body-related thoughts, erotic fantasies, and negative attitudes toward sexuality.

Methods: A wide self-administered survey used snowball sampling to reach 298 heterosexual Italian men (age = 32.66 ± 11.52 years) from the general population.

Outcomes: 13 questionnaires exploring psychological and social elements involved in sexual response were administrated: International Index of Erectile Function, Short Form 36 for Quality of Life, Beck Depression Inventory-II, Symptom Check List-90-Revised, Toronto Alexithymia Scale, Premature Ejaculation Severity Index, Sexual Distress Scale, Sexual Satisfaction Scale, Dyadic Adjustment Scale, Ambivalent Sexism Inventory, Sexual Modes Questionnaire, Sexual Dysfunctional Belief Questionnaire, and Questionnaire of Cognitive Schema Activation in Sexual Context.

Results: Results showed lack of erotic thoughts (β = -0.328), fear (β = -0.259) and desire to have a baby (β = -0.259) as the main predictors of the level of sexual desire in this group. Energy-fatigue, depression, premature ejaculation severity, sexual distress, compatibility, subjective sexual response, and sexual conservatism had a weaker effect on sexual desire. Sexual functioning (13.80%), emotional response (12.70%), dysfunctional sexual beliefs (12.10%), and negative automatic thoughts (12.00%) had more variable effects on sexual drive.

Clinical Translation: Analyzed variables could represent important factors that should be considered in the assessment of desire concerns and discussed in therapy.

Strengths And Limitations: The strength of this study is the analysis of novel psychological and social factors on male sexual desire. Recruitment and sample size do not allow generalization of the results, but some crucial points for future research and clinical practice are discussed.

Conclusion: Our findings showed that male sexual desire could be affected by many psychological and social elements. Other factors remain to be explored, in their direct and interactive effects, aiming to better explain male sexual desire functioning. Nimbi FM, Tripodi F, Rossi R, Simonelli C. Expanding the Analysis of Psychosocial Factors of Sexual Desire in Men. J Sex Med 2018;15:230-244.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsxm.2017.11.227DOI Listing
February 2018