Publications by authors named "Filipa Santana Ferreira"

5 Publications

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Intestinal parasitic infections in children under five in the Central Hospital of Nampula, Northern Mozambique.

J Infect Dev Ctries 2020 05 31;14(5):532-539. Epub 2020 May 31.

Global Health and Tropical Medicine, Unidade de Saúde Pública Internacional e Bioestatística, Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal.

Introduction: Intestinal parasites are known to cause infection in humans worldwide, with higher prevalence in low- and middle- incoming countries. Children are greatly affected leading to malnutrition and subsequently to physical and cognitive development impairment. Despite the scale and importance of this issue, there are few studies conducted in Mozambique concerning parasitic intestinal infections in hospitalized children. To our knowledge this is the first published report with data on this subject from Northern Mozambique.

Methodology: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 and 2013 in 831 children, attending the Central Hospital of Nampula in Northern Mozambique. One single stool sample was obtained from each child. Socio-demographic and clinical data were also obtained. Parasitological analysis of feces was performed through direct examination and Ritchie concentration technique and Giardia duodenalis antigen detection by rapid immunochromatographic test. Modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining was used for coccidia detection.

Results: The global prevalence of pathogenic intestinal parasites was 31.6%. G. duodenalis (23.9%) was by far the most prevalent parasite followed by Strongyloides stercoralis (4.1%) and Cryptosporidium sp. (3.4%). Intestinal parasites were more frequent in older children (p = 0.005; aOR = 1.025).

Conclusions: This work is one of the few published studies reporting intestinal parasites infection in hospitalized children. The percentage of children affected with G. duodenalis is higher than found in other studies in the African region. This highlights the need of particular attention being given to this intestinal protozoan and its resistance to water treatment, as well as to environmental health and personal hygiene.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3855/jidc.11620DOI Listing
May 2020

Infection by Intestinal Parasites, Stunting and Anemia in School-Aged Children from Southern Angola.

PLoS One 2015 15;10(9):e0137327. Epub 2015 Sep 15.

Global Health and Tropical Medicine, Unidade de Clínica Tropical, Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal.

Introduction: Intestinal parasites are responsible for morbidity in children worldwide, especially in low income countries. In the present study we determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites and explore its association with anemia and stunting in school-aged children.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from September to October 2010 enrolling 328 children attending the primary school in Lubango, the second largest city after the capital Luanda. Stool samples were collected for parasite detection through microscopy and molecular identification of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar. Stunting was assessed using the z-scores of height for age and hemoglobin concentration was determined using a portable hemoglobin analyzing system.

Results: The global prevalence of pathogenic intestinal parasites was 44.2%, the most common being Ascaris lumbricoides (22.0%), Giardia lamblia (20.1%) and Hymenolepis nana (8.8%). Molecular detection revealed that 13.1% of the children carried E. dispar and 0.3% were infected with E. histolytica. The prevalence of stunting (mild to severe) was 41.5%. Stunting was more frequent in older children (p = 0.006, OR = 1.886), while anemia was more frequent in younger children (p = 0.005, OR = 2.210). The prevalence of anemia was 21.6%, and we found a significant association with infection by H. nana (p = 0.031, OR = 2.449).

Conclusions: This is one of the few published studies reporting intestinal parasites infection, nutritional status and anemia in children from Angola. Furthermore, the present work highlights the importance of regular intestinal parasites screening in children.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0137327PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4570803PMC
May 2016

Giardia duodenalis and soil-transmitted helminths infections in children in São Tomé and Príncipe: do we think Giardia when addressing parasite control?

J Trop Pediatr 2015 Apr 20;61(2):106-12. Epub 2015 Jan 20.

Unidade de Clínica Tropical e Centro de Malária e Doenças Tropicais-LA, Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 1349-008 Lisboa, Portugal.

Giardia duodenalis prevalence is commonly as high as soil-transmitted helminths (STH), nevertheless is not considered for large-scale chemotherapy through mass drug administration (MDA) due to its short incubation period and frequent reinfections, its control being associated to improving access to water and sanitation. A study enrolling 444 children attending preschools was conducted in May 2011 during a deworming campaign. Faecal samples were obtained and analysed through microscopy of wet mounting and after Kato-Katz and formol-ether concentration techniques. The majority of children were infected with at least one pathogenic parasite (86.7%, 385 of 444). Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura (56.3%, 250 of 444 and 52.5%, 233 of 444, respectively) were the most frequent parasites followed by G. duodenalis infecting 41.7% (185 of 444) of the children. The present work aimed at obtaining updated information concerning intestinal parasite infections in children attending preschools in São Tomé and Príncipe and to contribute for the adequate management of the enteric infections.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tropej/fmu078DOI Listing
April 2015

Molecular and Clinical Characterization of Giardia duodenalis Infection in Preschool Children from Lisbon, Portugal.

J Parasitol Res 2013 8;2013:252971. Epub 2013 Sep 8.

Unidade de Clínica Tropical e Centro de Malária e Doenças Tropicais-LA, Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Rua da Junqueira 100, 1349-008 Lisboa, Portugal.

Giardia duodenalis is the most prevalent intestinal protozoan infection especially in children. In Portugal scarce data are available relative to this infection in preschoolers. The present study was conducted from April to July 2009 in public preschools in Lisbon enrolling 316 children. Stool examination was performed through microscopy. Molecular analysis was conducted in all positive samples for G. duodenalis in order to determine the assemblage and subassemblage of this parasite. Eight of the preschoolers studied children (2.5%, 8/316) were infected with G. duodenalis. Additionally the brother of one of the infected children was also infected. Genotyping analysis targeting ssu-rRNA and β -giardin loci revealed six infections with assemblage A and 3 with assemblage B. Sub-assemblage determination was possible in four of the samples, with three A2 and one A3. The limited number of cases precluded an association of a determined symptom with an assemblage. The data presented here show the relevance of considering G. duodenalis analysis in children with intestinal complaints even in developed countries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/252971DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3781992PMC
October 2013

Molecular characterization of Giardia duodenalis in children from the Cufada Lagoon Natural Park, Guinea-Bissau.

Parasitol Res 2012 Nov 23;111(5):2173-7. Epub 2012 Aug 23.

Unidade de Clínica Tropical e Centro de Malária e Doenças Tropicais-LA, Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Rua da Junqueira, 100, 1349-008 Lisboa, Portugal.

Molecular characterization of Giardia duodenalis in African countries is relatively scarce. The global understanding of Giardia epidemiology is reinforced when more data are available from highly endemic countries. In the present study, 50 fecal samples collected from children from Guinea-Bissau were screened for Giardia infection. Amplification of the Giardia ssu-rRNA fragment was achieved for 28 samples (28/50, 56.0 %) of which 23 (23/50, 46.0 %) positive samples for Giardia were detected through microscopy. Eighteen samples previous amplified for the ssu-rRNA locus were amplified for the bg gene fragment. Sequence analysis was performed in 26 and 17 samples for the ssu-rRNA and bg gene fragment, respectively. Our results revealed a predominance of assemblage B (22/26, 84.6 %), sequences with high genetic polymorphism among isolates belonging to this assemblage, making impossible the subassemblage determination. Assemblage A was identified in three isolates (3/26, 11.5 %), and our results strongly suggest that two isolates belong to subassemblage A2. This study provides information about G. duodenalis genotypes in a rural area of Guinea-Bissau and may contribute for a better understanding of giardiasis epidemiology in this country.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00436-012-3068-6DOI Listing
November 2012
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