Publications by authors named "Fhataheya Buang"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Genus : A Systematic Review.

Front Pharmacol 2020 27;11:504624. Epub 2020 Nov 27.

Centre for Drug and Herbal Development, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

species have been used traditionally to treat various ailments, such as fever, pain, and to control blood glucose level. This systematic review critically discusses studies regarding species that exhibited antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, thus providing perspectives and instructions for future research of the plants as a potential source of new dietary supplements or medicinal agents. A literature search from internet databases of PubMed, Scopus, Science Direct, e-theses Online Service, and ProQuest was carried out using a combination of keywords such as "," "antioxidant," "anti-inflammatory," or other related words. Research articles were included in this study if they were experimental ( and ) or clinical studies on the antioxidant or anti-inflammatory effects of species and if they were articles published in English. Altogether, 27 studies on antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of species were selected. The antioxidant effects of species were manifested by inhibition of reactive oxygen species production and lipid peroxidation, modulation of glutathione-related parameters, and enzymatic antioxidant production or activities. The anti-inflammatory effects of species were through the modulation of inflammatory cytokine production, inhibition of prostaglandin E and nitric oxide production, cellular inflammatory-related parameters, and inflammation in animal models. The potential anti-inflammatory signaling pathways modulated by species are glycogen synthase kinase-3, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, PPARγ, MAPK, NF-κB, and PI3K/Akt. However, most reports on antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of the plants were on crude extracts, and the chemical constituents contributing to bioactivities were not clearly understood. There is a variation in quality of studies in terms of design, conduct, and interpretation, and in-depth studies on the underlying mechanisms involved in antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of the plants are in demand. Moreover, there is limited clinical study on antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of species. This review highlighted antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of genus and supported their traditional uses to treat oxidative stress and inflammatory-related diseases. This review is expected to catalyze further studies on genus . However, extensive preclinical data need to be generated from toxicity and pharmacokinetic studies before clinical studies can be pursued for their development into clinical medicines to treat oxidative stress and inflammatory conditions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphar.2020.504624DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7734347PMC
November 2020

Anti-hyperuricemic and Anti-inflammatory Effects of as Potential Treatment for Gout.

Front Pharmacol 2020 17;11:289. Epub 2020 Mar 17.

Drug and Herbal Research Centre, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

(Primulaceae) has been used in Malaysian folk medicine to help women regain strength after delivery and for "sickness in the bones." It was previously revealed that its extracts inhibited xanthine oxidase (XO) activity . The leaves and roots of var. (MPA), var. (MPP), and var. (MPL) were individually extracted in ethanol (80%). The anti-hyperuricemic activity was initially assessed by XO inhibition with a spectrophotometric assay. The most active extract was further investigated on hyperuricemic rat model induced by potassium oxonate to determine serum uric acid levels and liver XO effect. The anti-inflammatory activity was carried out on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines (i.e., interleukin (IL)1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α) secretion using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and ELISA technique, and prostaglandin E (PGE)secretion using radioimmunoassay. The active extract was then investigated on gout-induced inflammation with MSU crystals to determine pro-inflammatory cytokines and PGE secretion levels in the synovial fluid of rat knee joint. Quantitative analysis using validated HPLC was performed on the extracts to determine presence of bioactive flavonoids. The findings revealed that extract of MPP leaves gave the highest inhibitory activity on XO (IC 130.5 μg/mL) compared to other extracts tested. However, all extracts possessed significantly lower activity compared to allopurinol (IC 0.13 μg/mL). Oral administration of MPP leaf extract (200 mg/kg) significantly reduced serum uric acid level in hyperuricemic rats in time-dependent manner to the baseline level and it was as effective as allopurinol (5 mg/kg). The extract also inhibited liver XO activity (25%) compared to allopurinol (45%). anti-inflammatory assay showed that extract of MPP roots inhibited MSU crystals-induced secretion of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-8, TNF-α, and PGE with IC values of 36, 25, 38, 18, and 46 μg/mL, respectively. Oral administration of the MPP root extract (200 mg/kg) significantly decreased IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and PGE levels in rat's synovial fluid as effective as indomethacin. There were no significant body weight changes of all experimental animals. MPP extracts showed presence of myricetin, quercetin and kaempferol. Myricetin was detected with values of 0.2 and 0.6 mg/g for root and leaf extracts, respectively. The anti-hyperuricemic of MPP leaf and anti-inflammatory of MPP root indicated that MPP may be promising for complementary therapy of gout.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphar.2020.00289DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7092620PMC
March 2020

Standardised Extract Reduces Cholesterol Levels and Modulates Oxidative Status in Postmenopausal Rats Fed with Cholesterol Diet Enriched with Repeatedly Heated Palm Oil.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2019 23;2019:7246756. Epub 2019 Sep 23.

Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, The National University of Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

(Lour.) Merr. (GP) has been reported in previous studies to possess antihyperlipidaemic, antioxidative, and cardioprotective properties. This study was aimed to determine the effect of standardised 80% ethanol extract of GP on lipid profiles and oxidative status of hypercholesterolemic rats. Postmenopausal (PM) Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomised and fed with 2% cholesterol diet fortified with five times heated palm oil to develop hyperlipidaemia status. Two doses of the extract (250 and 500 mg/kg) and atorvastatin (10 mg/kg) were administered once daily via oral gavage for 24 weeks. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was increased during the first month in the postmenopausal group and decreased with GP supplementation. Lipid droplets accumulation was shown at the tunica media (TM) area of the aorta in the postmenopausal group and reduced with GP supplementation. Total cholesterol (TC), total triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels increased ( < 0.05) at 3 and 6 months in the postmenopausal group and were reduced with GP supplementation. GP also increased high-density lipoprotein (HDL) level in the postmenopausal group. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities were reduced in the postmenopausal group compared to control in the sham group but increased ( < 0.05) with GP supplementation. The results showed that the higher dose of GP (500 mg/kg) gave better effect. GP has the ability to reduce oxidative stress and prevent membrane cell damage through antioxidant enzyme activity modification and lipid profile changes in postmenopausal rats related to atherosclerosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2019/7246756DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6778942PMC
September 2019

Antibacterial activity of biosynthesized gold nanoparticles using biomolecules from and chitosan.

Saudi Pharm J 2019 Feb 23;27(2):283-292. Epub 2018 Nov 23.

Tissue Engineering Centre, UKM Medical Centre, 56000, Cheras, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

A simple, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly method is needed for synthesizing metal nanoparticles, including gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). In this study, AuNPs were synthesized with sclerotial extract (LRE) and chitosan (CS) as reducing and stabilizing agents, respectively. Different LRE concentrations from cold and hot water extraction (CWE and HWE, respectively) were used to reduce chloroauric acid (HAuCl) to form AuNPs. Positively charged chitosan stabilized AuNPs (CS-AuNPs) mediated by LRE exhibited a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 533 nm. The CS-AuNPs synthesized using CWE had a smaller particle size (49.5 ± 6.7-82.4 ± 28.0 nm) compared to that of the HWE samples (80.3 ± 23.4-125.3 ± 41.5 nm), depending on LRE concentration. FTIR results suggested protein and polysaccharides in LRE were the sources of reducing power, reducing gold ions to AuNPs. CS-AuNPs were mostly spherical with higher LRE concentrations, whereas some triangular, pentagonal, irregular, and rod shaped AuNPs were observed at lower LRE concentrations. CS-AuNPs mediated by LRE displayed effective antibacterial activity against gram-negative ( and ) and gram-positive bacteria ( and sp.). Thus, the biosynthesized AuNPs using LRE and chitosan provide opportunities for developing stable and eco-friendly nanoparticles with effective antibacterial properties.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsps.2018.11.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6362174PMC
February 2019

Transdermal anti-inflammatory activity of bilayer film containing olive compound hydroxytyrosol: physical assessment, in vivo dermal safety and efficacy study in Freund's adjuvant-induced arthritic rat model.

Drug Dev Ind Pharm 2017 Jan 2;43(1):108-119. Epub 2016 Sep 2.

a Centre for Drug Delivery Research, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia , Kuala Lumpur , Malaysia.

Previous studies have shown that hydroxytyrosol (HT) can be a potential alternative therapeutic agent for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, HT is extensively metabolized following oral administration, which leads to formulating HT in a topical vehicle to prolong drug action as well as to provide a localized effect. Hidrox-6 is a freeze-dried powder derived from fresh olives and contains a high amount of HT (∼3%) and other polyphenols. Alginate bilayer films containing 5% and 10% Hidrox-6 were formulated. The films were characterized with respect to their physical, morphology, rheological properties; drug content uniformity; and in vitro drug release. Acute dermal irritancy tests and a skin sensitization study were carried out in rats. An efficacy study of the bilayer films for RA was conducted using Freund's adjuvant-induced polyarthritis rats. Animal data showed that the bilayer film formulations did not cause skin irritancy. The efficacy in vivo results showed that the Hidrox-6 bilayer films lowered the arthritic scores, paw and ankle circumference, serum IL-6 level and cumulative histological scores compared with those measured for controls. The topical Hidrox-6 bilayer films improve synovitis and inflammatory symptoms in RA and can be a potential alternative to oral RA therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03639045.2016.1224893DOI Listing
January 2017

Enhancement of oral insulin bioavailability: in vitro and in vivo assessment of nanoporous stimuli-responsive hydrogel microparticles.

Expert Opin Drug Deliv 2016 24;13(5):621-32. Epub 2016 Mar 24.

d Faculty of Pharmacy , Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia , Kuala Lumpur , Malaysia.

Objective: Oral insulin administration suffers gastrointestinal tract (GIT) degradation and inadequate absorption from the intestinal epithelium resulting in poor bioavailability. This study entails in vitro and in vivo assessment of stimuli-responsive hydrogel microparticles (MPs) in an attempt to circumvent GI barrier and enhance oral insulin bioavailability.

Methods: Bacterial cellulose-g-poly(acrylic acid) (BC-g-P(AA)) hydrogel MPs were evaluated for morphology, swelling, entrapment efficiency (EE), in vitro insulin release and enzyme inhibition. The ex vivo mucoadhesion, insulin degradation and transport were investigated in excised intestinal tissues. The effect of MPs on paracellular transport was studied in Caco-2/HT29-MTX monolayers. The in vivo hypoglycemic effect and pharmacokinetics of insulin-loaded MPs were investigated in diabetic rats.

Results: Hydrogel MPs efficiently entrapped insulin (EE up to 84%) and exhibited pH-responsive in vitro release. The MPs decreased the proteolytic activity of trypsin (up to 60%). Insulin transport across monolayers was increased up to 5.9-times by MPs. Histological assessment of GI tissues confirmed the non-toxicity of MPs. Orally administered insulin-loaded MPs showed higher hypoglycemic effect as compared to insulin solution and enhanced relative oral bioavailability of insulin up to 7.45-times.

Conclusion: These findings suggest that BC-g-P(AA) MPs are promising biomaterials to overcome the barriers of oral insulin delivery and enhancing its bioavailability.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1517/17425247.2016.1160889DOI Listing
September 2016

Minimization of Local and Systemic Adverse Effects of Topical Glucocorticoids by Nanoencapsulation: In Vivo Safety of Hydrocortisone-Hydroxytyrosol Loaded Chitosan Nanoparticles.

J Pharm Sci 2015 Dec 8;104(12):4276-4286. Epub 2015 Oct 8.

Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur 56000, Malaysia.

Hydrocortisone (HC) is a topical glucocorticoid for the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD); the local as well as systemic side effects limit its use. Hydroxytyrosol (HT) is a polyphenol present in olive oil that has strong antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. HC-HT coloaded chitosan nanoparticles (HC-HT CSNPs) were therefore developed to improve the efficacy against AD. In this study, HC-HT CSNPs of 235 ± 9 nm in size and with zeta potential +39.2 ± 1.6 mV were incorporated into aqueous cream (vehicle) and investigated for acute dermal toxicity, dermal irritation, and repeated dose toxicity using albino Wistar rats. HC-HT CSNPs exhibited LD50 > 125 mg/body surface area of active, which is 100-fold higher than the normal human dose of HC. Compared with the commercial formulation, 0.5 g of HC-HT CSNPs did not cause skin irritation, as measured by Tewameter®, Mexameter®, and as observed visually. Moreover, no-observed-adverse-effect level was observed with respect to body weight, organ weight, feed consumption, blood hematological and biochemical, urinalysis, and histopathological parameters at a dose of 1000 mg/body surface area per day of HC-HT CSNPs for 28 days. This in vivo study demonstrated that nanoencapsulation significantly reduced the toxic effects of HC and this should allow further clinical investigations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jps.24666DOI Listing
December 2015

Protective effects of the standardized extract of Zingiber officinale on myocardium against isoproterenol-induced biochemical and histopathological alterations in rats.

Pharm Biol 2015 14;53(12):1795-802. Epub 2015 Apr 14.

Faculty of Pharmacy, Drug and Herbal Research Center, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia , Kuala Lumpur , Malaysia.

Context: Ginger [Zingiber officinale Roscoe. (Zingiberaceae)] has been universally used as a spice as well as for its health benefits.

Objective: The present study evaluates the protective effect of the standardized extract of ginger against isoproterenol (ISO)-induced myocardial infarction (MI) in rats.

Materials And Methods: Wistar rats were pretreated orally with three doses of standardized ginger extract (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg of body weight) or propranolol (5 mg/mL) for 28 d prior to ISO (85 mg/kg) induced MI in two doses on days 29 and 30. The rats were sacrificed 48 h after the first induction; serum and hearts were collected for biochemical and histopathological analysis.

Results: Gingerols and shogaols were identified and quantitatively analyzed in the extracts using validated reversed phase HPLC methods. Pretreatment with ginger extract at 400 mg/kg showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in all the cardiac enzyme activities, i.e., cardiac troponin I (cTnI) (0.57 ng/mL), creatine kinase MB isoenzyme (CK-MB) (10.34 pg/mL), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) (115.22 U/L), alanine transaminase (ALT) (15.79 U/L), and aspartate transaminase (AST) (46.72 U/L) when compared with ISO-control rats. There were significant rises (p < 0.05) in the activity of glutathione peroxide (GPx) (53.16 U/L), catalase (CAT) (210.41 U/L), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) (280.89 U/mL) of the pretreated rats when compared with the ISO-control. Histopathological examination showed an improvement in membrane cell integrity in pretreated rats compared with untreated rats.

Conclusion: The ethanol extract of ginger exhibited cardioprotective potential in treating myocardial injury following ISO administration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/13880209.2015.1008147DOI Listing
May 2016

Inhibitory effect of triterpenoids from Dillenia serrata (Dilleniaceae) on prostaglandin E2 production and quantitative HPLC analysis of its koetjapic acid and betulinic acid contents.

Molecules 2015 Feb 16;20(2):3206-20. Epub 2015 Feb 16.

Laboratory of Natural Products Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Halu Oleo University, Kendari 93232, Indonesia.

The crude methanol extracts and fractions of the root and stem barks of Dillenia serrata Thunb. showed 64% to 73% inhibition on the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in lipopolysaccharide-induced human whole blood using a radioimmunoassay technique. Three triterpenoids isolated from the root bark of the plant, koetjapic (1), 3-oxoolean-12-en-30-oic (2), and betulinic (3) acids, exhibited significant concentration-dependent inhibitory effects on PGE2 production with IC50 values of 1.05, 1.54, and 2.59 μM, respectively, as compared with the positive control, indomethacin (IC50 = 0.45 μM). Quantification of compounds 1 and 3 in the methanol extracts and fractions were carried out by using a validated reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method. The ethyl acetate fraction of the stem bark showed the highest content of both compound 1 (15.1%) and compound 3 (52.8%). The strong inhibition of the extracts and fractions on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzymatic activity was due to the presence of their major constituents, especially koetjapic and betulinic acids.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules20023206DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6272585PMC
February 2015

Self-assembled polymeric nanoparticles for percutaneous co-delivery of hydrocortisone/hydroxytyrosol: an ex vivo and in vivo study using an NC/Nga mouse model.

Int J Pharm 2013 Feb 18;444(1-2):109-19. Epub 2013 Jan 18.

Centre for Drug Delivery Research, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz 50300, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

In this study, hydroxytyrosol (HT; a potent antioxidant) was co-administered with hydrocortisone (HC) to mitigate the systemic adverse effects of the latter and to provide additional anti-inflammatory and antioxidant benefits in the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD). The co-loaded nanoparticles (NPs) prepared had shown different particle sizes, zeta potentials, loading efficiencies, and morphology, when the pH of the chitosan solution was increased from 3.0 to 7.0. Ex vivo permeation data showed that the co-loaded NPs formulation significantly reduced the corresponding flux (17.04μg/cm(2)/h) and permeation coefficient (3.4×10(-3)cm/h) of HC across full-thickness NC/Nga mouse skin. In addition, the NPs formulation showed higher epidermal (1560±31μg/g of skin) and dermal (880±28μg/g of skin) accumulation of HC than did a commercial HC formulation. Moreover, an in vivo study using an NC/Nga mouse model revealed that compared to the other treatment groups, the group treated with the NPs formulation efficiently controlled transepidermal water loss (13±2g/m(2)/h), intensity of erythema (207±12), and dermatitis index (mild). In conclusion, NPs co-loaded with HC/HT is proposed as a promising system for the percutaneous co-delivery of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative agents in the treatment of AD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpharm.2013.01.024DOI Listing
February 2013

Correlation between Chemical Composition of Curcuma domestica and Curcuma xanthorrhiza and Their Antioxidant Effect on Human Low-Density Lipoprotein Oxidation.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2012 26;2012:438356. Epub 2012 Nov 26.

Drug and Herbal Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz, 50300 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

The antioxidant activity of the curcuminoids of Curcuma domestica L. and C. xanthorrhiza Roxb. and eight compounds which are prevalent constituents of their rhizome oils were investigated in an effort to correlate human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) antioxidant activity with the effect of the herbs and their components. The antioxidant activity was examined using thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARSs) assay with human LDL as the oxidation substrate. The methanol extracts and rhizome oils of C. xanthorrhiza and C. domestica showed strong inhibitory activity on copper-mediated oxidation of LDL. Curcumin, demethoxycurcumin, and bisdemethoxycurcumin, isolated from the methanol extracts of both plants, exhibited stronger activity than probucol (IC(50) value 0.57 μmol/L) as reference, with IC(50) values ranging from 0.15 to 0.33 μmol/L. Xanthorrhizol, the most abundant component (31.9%) of the oil of C. xanthorrhiza, showed relatively strong activity with an IC(50) value of 1.93 μmol/L. The major components of C. domestica, ar-turmerone (45.8%) and zerumbone (3.5%), exhibited IC(50) values of 10.18 and 24.90 μmol/L, respectively. The high levels of curcuminoids in the methanol extracts and xanthorrhizol, ar-turmerone and zerumbone in the oils, and in combination with the minor components were responsible for the high LDL antioxidant activity of the herbs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/438356DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3519093PMC
December 2012