Publications by authors named "Fernando De-Torres-Alba"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Maternal and neonatal complications in women with congenital heart disease: a nationwide analysis.

Eur Heart J 2021 Oct 12. Epub 2021 Oct 12.

Department of Cardiology III, Adult Congenital and Valvular Heart Disease, University Hospital Muenster, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, 48149 Münster, Germany.

Aims: The aim of this study was to provide population-based data on maternal and neonatal complications and outcome in the pregnancies of women with congenital heart disease (CHD).

Methods And Results: Based on administrative data from one of the largest German Health Insurance Companies (BARMER GEK, ∼9 million members representative for Germany), all pregnancies in women with CHD between 2005 and 2018 were analysed. In addition, an age-matched non-CHD control group was included for comparison and the association between adult CHD (ACHD) and maternal or neonatal outcomes investigated. Overall, 7512 pregnancies occurred in 4015 women with CHD. The matched non-CHD control group included 6502 women with 11 225 pregnancies. Caesarean deliveries were more common in CHD patients (40.5% vs. 31.5% in the control group; P < 0.001). There was no excess mortality. Although the maternal complication rate was low in absolute terms, women with CHD had a significantly higher rate of stroke, heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias during pregnancy (P < 0.001 for all). Neonatal mortality was low but also significantly higher in the ACHD group (0.83% vs. 0.22%; P = 0.001) and neonates to CHD mothers had low/extremely low birth weight or extreme immaturity (<0.001) or required resuscitation and mechanical ventilation more often compared to non-CHD offspring (P < 0.001 for both). On multivariate logistic regression maternal defect complexity, arterial hypertension, heart failure, prior fertility treatment, and anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists emerged as significant predictors of adverse neonatal outcome (P < 0.05 for all). Recurrence of CHD was 6.1 times higher in infants to ACHD mothers compared to controls (P < 0.0001).

Conclusions: This population-based study illustrates a reassuringly low maternal mortality rate in a highly developed healthcare system. Nevertheless, maternal morbidity and neonatal morbidity/mortality were significantly increased in women with ACHD and their offspring compared to non-ACHD controls highlighting the need of specialized care and pre-pregnancy counselling.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/ehab571DOI Listing
October 2021

Lack of specialist care is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in adult congenital heart disease: a population-based study.

Eur Heart J 2021 Jul 16. Epub 2021 Jul 16.

Department of Cardiology III-Adult Congenital and Valvular Heart Disease, University Hospital Muenster, Albert-Schweitzer Campus 1, Building A1, Münster 48149, Germany.

Aims: The aim of this study was to provide population-based data on the healthcare provision for adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) and the impact of cardiology care on morbidity and mortality in this vulnerable population.

Methods And Results: Based on administrative data from one of the largest German Health Insurance Companies, all insured ACHD patients (<70 years of age) were included. Patients were stratified into those followed exclusively by primary care physicians (PCPs) and those with additional cardiology follow-up between 2014 and 2016. Associations between level of care and outcome were assessed by multivariable/propensity score Cox analyses. Overall, 24 139 patients (median age 43 years, 54.8% female) were included. Of these, only 49.7% had cardiology follow-up during the 3-year period, with 49.2% of patients only being cared for by PCPs and 1.1% having no contact with either. After comprehensive multivariable and propensity score adjustment, ACHD patients under cardiology follow-up had a significantly lower risk of death [hazard ratio (HR) 0.81, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.67-0.98; P = 0.03) or major events (HR 0.85, 95% CI 0.78-0.92; P < 0.001) compared to those only followed by PCPs. At 3-year follow-up, the absolute risk difference for mortality was 0.9% higher in ACHD patients with moderate/severe complexity lesions cared by PCPs compared to those under cardiology follow-up.

Conclusion: Cardiology care compared with primary care is associated with superior survival and lower rates of major complications in ACHD. It is alarming that even in a high resource setting with well-established specialist ACHD care approximately 50% of contemporary ACHD patients are still not linked to regular cardiac care. Almost all patients had at least one contact with a PCP during the study period, suggesting that opportunities to refer patients to cardiac specialists were missed at PCP level. More efforts are required to alert PCPs and patients to appropriate ACHD care.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/ehab422DOI Listing
July 2021

Mortality and morbidity in patients with congenital heart disease hospitalised for viral pneumonia.

Heart 2020 Oct 27. Epub 2020 Oct 27.

Adult Congenital and Valvular Heart Disease Center, Department of Cardiology and Angiology, University Hospital Muenster, Muenster, Germany.

Objectives: Data on the clinical outcome of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) affected by severe viral pneumonia are limited. We analysed morbidity and mortality of viral pneumonia and evaluated the association between medical conditions, medication, vaccination and outcome specifically in patients with CHD requiring hospitalisation for viral pneumonia.

Methods: Based on data from one of Germany's largest health insurers, all cases of viral pneumonia requiring hospital admission (2005-2018) were studied. Mortality, and composites of death, transplantation, mechanical circulatory support, ventilation or extracorporeal lung support served as endpoints.

Results: Overall, 26 262 viral pneumonia cases occurred in 24 980 patients. Of these, 1180 cases occurred in patients with CHD. Compared with patients without CHD, mortality rate was elevated in patients with CHD. As a group, patients with CHD aged 20-59 years even exceeded mortality rates in patients without CHD aged >60 years. No mortality was observed in patients with CHD with simple defects <60 years of age without associated cardiovascular risk factors. On multivariable logistic regression analysis, age, CHD complexity, chromosomal anomalies, cardiac medication, use of immunosuppressants and absence of vaccination for influenza emerged as risk factors of adverse outcome.

Conclusions: We present timely data on morbidity and mortality of severe viral pneumonia requiring hospital admission in patients with CHD. Need for mechanical ventilation and risk of death in CHD increase early in life, reaching a level equivalent to non-CHD individuals >60 years of age. Our data suggest that except for patients with isolated simple defects, patients with CHD should be considered higher-risk individuals when faced with severe viral pneumonia.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/heartjnl-2020-317706DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8223651PMC
October 2020

Adult congenital heart disease in Spain: present situation and future perspectives.

Rev Esp Cardiol (Engl Ed) 2020 Oct 27;73(10):792-794. Epub 2020 Jun 27.

Department of Cardiology III, Adult Congenital and Valvular Heart Disease, University Hospital Muenster, Münster, Germany. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rec.2020.04.020DOI Listing
October 2020

Delayed pacemaker requirement after transcatheter aortic valve implantation with a new-generation balloon expandable valve: Should we monitor longer?

Int J Cardiol 2018 Dec 26;273:56-62. Epub 2018 Jul 26.

Dept. of Cardiology III - Adult Congenital and Valvular Heart Disease, University Hospital Muenster, Muenster, Germany.

Objectives: To analyze the timing of appearance of conduction abnormalities (CAs) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), to identify predictors of delayed CAs requiring pacemaker (PM) implantation and to provide guidance regarding the duration of telemetry monitoring.

Background: How long patients remain at risk of development of CAs requiring PM implantation after TAVI and for how long they should be monitored remains unclear but is crucial when considering early discharge.

Methods: Development of CAs was studied in 701 consecutive patients treated with Edwards Sapien 3 valves and monitored with telemetry for 7 days in a single center. After excluding valve-in-valve procedures and patients with previous PM, 606 patients remained for analysis. Predictors of CAs requiring PM and the time of onset of CAs were analyzed.

Results: Of 606 patients 76 (12.5%) required a PM after TAVI. CAs requiring PM implantation occurred after 48 h in 22.4% (17 patients) and in 10.5% (8 patients) even after 5 days. Of the patients who developed high grade CAs requiring PM after 48 h, 47.1% had no CAs prior to TAVI, and 23.5% had neither pre-existing CAs nor new-developed CAs within the first 48 h after TAVI.

Conclusion: After TAVI using a new-generation balloon-expandable valve, delayed development of CAs requiring PM implantation is not uncommon, even after 5 days. More importantly, 23.5% of patients eventually requiring a delayed PM implantation had still no CAs at 48 h after TAVI in this study. These results question the safety of early discharge and support ECG monitoring for a longer time period. The most optimal way to monitor these patients is yet to be determined.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2018.07.131DOI Listing
December 2018

Prevention of sudden cardiac death in patients with Tetralogy of Fallot: Risk assessment and long term outcome.

Int J Cardiol 2018 Oct 28;269:91-96. Epub 2018 Jun 28.

Department of Cardiology II - Electrophysiology, University Hospital Münster, Germany. Electronic address:

Background: In patients with repaired Tetralogy of Fallot (ToF), implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) are considered reasonable in selected adults with multiple risk factors for sudden cardiac death.

Patients And Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study of all 174 patients with repaired ToF who are followed at the University Hospital of Muenster. We analyzed data according to the risk score previously proposed by Khairy and coworkers and patient outcome. We analyzed data separately for patients without previous sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT) (risk stratification group, n = 157) and patients with VT/secondary prevention ICD (n = 17).

Results: In the risk stratification group, a mean of 4 ± 1 risk score parameters were available. All six risk parameters were known in 10%, five in 14%. Risk score increased with availability of parameters. 15 patients with secondary prevention ICD had a mean risk score of 6.3 ± 2.2 (range 2-10). 11 patients of the risk stratification group with primary prevention ICD had a mean risk score 5.8 ± 2.4 (range 3-8). During follow-up of up to 14 years, five patients died (3%): at age 58, two at 69 and two at 76 years.

Conclusion: In the majority of patients risk score variables were incomplete, severely limiting its applicability because the true score cannot be calculated. Risk scores were not different between patients with secondary prevention ICD and patients with ICD for primary prevention based on current guidelines. Standardization of follow-up and prospective evaluation of these standards in large prospective patient cohorts is desirable to improve risk stratification in patients with ToF.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2018.06.107DOI Listing
October 2018

Impact of Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Implantation on the Timing of Reintervention for Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Dysfunction.

Rev Esp Cardiol (Engl Ed) 2018 Oct 30;71(10):838-846. Epub 2018 May 30.

Department of Cardiology III - Adult Congenital and Valvular Heart Disease, University Hospital Muenster, Muenster, Germany.

Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is the most common cyanotic congenital heart defect. Early surgical repair has dramatically improved the outcome of this condition. However, despite the success of contemporary approaches with early complete repair, these are far from being curative and late complications are frequent. The most common complication is right ventricle outflow tract (RVOT) dysfunction, affecting most patients in the form of pulmonary regurgitation, pulmonary stenosis, or both, and can lead to development of symptoms of exercise intolerance, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Optimal timing of restoration of RVOT functionality in asymptomatic patients with RVOT dysfunction after TOF repair is still a matter of debate. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation, introduced almost 2 decades ago, has become a major game-changer in the treatment of RVOT dysfunction. In this article we review the pathophysiology, the current indications, and treatment options for RVOT dysfunction in patients after TOF repair with a focus on the role of percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation in the therapeutic approach to these patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rec.2018.05.001DOI Listing
October 2018

Changes in the Pacemaker Rate After Transition From Edwards SAPIEN XT to SAPIEN 3 Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: The Critical Role of Valve Implantation Height.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv 2016 Apr 23;9(8):805-813. Epub 2016 Mar 23.

Division of Adult Congenital and Valvular Heart Disease, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University Hospital Muenster, Muenster, Germany. Electronic address:

Objectives: The aim of this study was to analyze the pacemaker implantation rate (PMIR) with the new balloon-expandable Edwards SAPIEN 3 valve (S3) and the factors associated with it.

Background: The introduction of the S3 for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has led to a reduction in paravalvular regurgitation. There are, however, concerns that the new design may increase the PMIR.

Methods: The first 206 patients treated with the S3 were compared with 371 preceding patients treated with SAPIEN XT valves. Patients who previously underwent pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation or transapical and valve-in-valve procedures were excluded from the analysis. All patients were monitored for at least 7 days. Previous and new conduction abnormalities were documented, and prosthesis implantation height was assessed for the S3.

Results: There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between groups. The PMIR was, however, significantly higher for the S3 (19.1% vs. 12.2%; p = 0.046). The mean implantation height was significantly lower in patients requiring PMI (67%/33% vs. 72%/28% aortic/ventricular stent extension, p = 0.032). On multivariate regression analysis, implantation height was the only independent predictor of PMI (odds ratio: 0.94 [95% confidence interval: 0.90 to 0.99]; p = 0.009). It increased from 68%/32% to 75%/25% when comparing the first with the second half of S3 implantations (p < 0.0001). This change was associated with a significant decrease in PMIR from 25.9% to 12.3% (p = 0.028), no longer different from the XT valve (12.2%).

Conclusions: The PMIR after TAVR is higher with the S3 than with the XT and is independently associated with the implantation height. This increase in the PMIR may be avoided by intending an aortic stent extension >70%.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcin.2015.12.023DOI Listing
April 2016

Utility of intracardiac echocardiography for catheter ablation of complex cardiac arrhythmias in a medium-volume training center.

Echocardiography 2015 Apr 11;32(4):660-70. Epub 2014 Aug 11.

Department of Cardiology, La Paz University Hospital, Madrid, Spain; Atherothrombosis, Imaging and Epidemiology Department, National Center for Cardiovascular Research (CNIC), Madrid, Spain.

Aims And Objectives: New electrophysiology tools like intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) might help to minimize and early detect complications during cardiac ablation procedures. The aim of the study was to assess the utility and vascular safety of ICE during catheter ablation of complex cardiac arrhythmias in a medium-volume training center.

Methods: Prospective, observational study consisted of consecutive patients who underwent catheter-based ablation of complex cardiac arrhythmias. All procedures were performed using three-dimensional electro-anatomical mapping and routine cannulation of right and left femoral veins. The ICE probe was initially positioned at the mid-level of the right atrium and properly moved to monitor different steps of the procedure and identify complications. All procedure-related vascular complications were registered.

Results: One hundred two patients (age 61.4 ± 13.1 years, 69 male) underwent 110 ablation procedures. Pulmonary vein isolation was the most common ablation substrate (55.4%). Ventricular tachycardia (17.2%) and left atrial flutter procedures (16.4%) were also common. The use of ICE enabled us to early initiate anticoagulation and to optimize the transseptal puncture. It also provided the capability to early detect life-threatening complications such as tamponade (3.6%), along with important information during the procedure such as exact catheter location, lesion formation, and stability during radiofrequency delivery. Such benefits were not associated with a higher number of vascular complications.

Conclusion: The use of ICE during catheter-based ablation of complex cardiac substrates provides technical features that may decrease complications and increase accuracy while applying radiofrequency, especially in training centers where fellows start to perform complex procedures.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/echo.12714DOI Listing
April 2015

Left atrial appendage fistula mimicking a paravalvular prosthetic regurgitation.

J Am Coll Cardiol 2013 Sep 24;62(12):e23. Epub 2013 Jul 24.

Department of Cardiology, La Paz University Hospital, Madrid, Spain.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2013.03.093DOI Listing
September 2013

Obstructive sleep apnea and coronary artery disease: from pathophysiology to clinical implications.

Pulm Med 2013 15;2013:768064. Epub 2013 Apr 15.

Acute Cardiac Care Unit, Department of Cardiology, La Paz University Hospital, Paseo de la Castellana 261, 28046 Madrid, Spain.

Coronary artery disease (CAD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are both complex and significant clinical problems. The pathophysiological mechanisms that link OSA with CAD are complex and can influence the broad spectrum of conditions caused by CAD, from subclinical atherosclerosis to myocardial infarction. OSA remains a significant clinical problem among patients with CAD, and evidence suggesting its role as a risk factor for CAD is growing. Furthermore, increasing data support that CAD prognosis may be influenced by OSA and its treatment by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. However, stronger evidence is needed to definitely answer these questions. This paper focuses on the relationship between OSA and CAD from the pathophysiological effects of OSA in CAD, to the clinical implications of OSA and its treatment in CAD patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/768064DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3649685PMC
May 2013

Specific targeting of human inflamed endothelium and in situ vascular tissue transfection by the use of ultrasound contrast agents.

JACC Cardiovasc Imaging 2009 Aug;2(8):997-1005

Servicio de Inmunología, Hospital de la Princesa, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.

Objectives: We used human umbilical cord segments as an ex vivo model to investigate the possible clinical diagnostic and therapeutic applications of microbubbles (MBs).

Background: Microbubbles are commonly used in clinical practice as ultrasound contrast agents. Several studies have addressed the in vivo applications of MBs for specific targeting of vascular dysfunction or sonoporation in animal models, but to date no human tissue model has been established.

Methods: Primary venular endothelial cell monolayers were targeted with MBs conjugated to an antibody against a highly expressed endothelial marker (tetraspanin CD9), and binding was assessed under increasing flow rates (0.5 to 5 dynes/cm(2)). Furthermore, CD9-coupled MB endothelial targeting was measured under flow conditions by contrast-enhanced ultrasound analysis in an ex vivo human macrovascular model (umbilical cord vein), and the same tissue model was used for the detection of inflamed vasculature with anti-intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1-coated MBs. Finally, plasmids encoding fluorescent proteins were sonoporated into umbilical cord vessels.

Results: Specific endothelial targeting in the in vitro and ex vivo models described previously was achieved by the use of MBs covered with an anti-CD9. Furthermore, we managed to induce inflammation in umbilical cord veins and detect it with real-time echography imaging using anti-ICAM-1-coupled MBs. Moreover, expression and correct localization of green fluorescent protein and green fluorescent protein-tagged ICAM-1 were assessed in this human ex vivo model without causing vascular damage.

Conclusions: In the absence of clinical trials to test the benefits and possible applications of ultrasound contrast agents for molecular imaging and therapy, we have developed a novel ex vivo human model using umbilical cords that is valid for the detection of inflammation and for exogenous expression of proteins by sonoporation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcmg.2009.04.012DOI Listing
August 2009
-->