Publications by authors named "Fernanda C Amparo"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Muscle Mass Assessed by Computed Tomography at the Third Lumbar Vertebra Predicts Patient Survival in Chronic Kidney Disease.

J Ren Nutr 2021 Jul 27;31(4):342-350. Epub 2020 Nov 27.

Nutrition Program and Nephrology Division, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Objective: Muscle mass is a key element for the evaluation of nutritional disturbances in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Low muscle mass is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The assessment of muscle mass by computed tomography at the third lumbar vertebra region (CTMM-L3) is an accurate method not subject to errors from fluctuation in the hydration status. Therefore, we aimed at investigating whether CTMM-L3 was able to predict mortality in nondialyzed CKD 3-5 patients.

Methods: This is a prospective observational cohort study. We evaluated 223 nondialyzed CKD patients (60.3 ± 10.6 years; 64% men; 50% diabetics; glomerular filtration rate 20.7 ± 9.6 mLmin1.73 m). Muscle mass was measured by CTMM-L3 using the Slice-O-Matic software and analyzed according to percentile adjusted by gender. Nutritional parameters, laboratory data, and comorbidities were evaluated, and mortality was followed up for 4 years.

Results: During the study period, 63 patients died, and the main cause of death was cardiovascular disease. Patients who died were older, had lower hemoglobin and albumin, as well as lower muscle markers. CTMM-L3 below the 25th percentile was associated with higher mortality according to the Kaplan-Meier curve (P = .017) and in Cox regression analysis (crude hazard ratio, 1.87 [95% confidence interval, 1.11-3.16]), also when adjusting for potential confounders (hazard ratio 1.83 [95% confidence interval 1.02-3.30]).

Conclusion: Low muscle mass measured by computed tomography at the third lumbar vertebra region is an independent predictor of increased mortality in nondialyzed CKD patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.jrn.2020.05.007DOI Listing
July 2021

Implementation of a Brazilian Cardioprotective Nutritional (BALANCE) Program for improvement on quality of diet and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events: A randomized, multicenter trial.

Am Heart J 2019 09 21;215:187-197. Epub 2019 Jun 21.

Hospital Universitário Pedro Ernesto, Rio de Janeiro-RJ, Brazil.

Background: Appropriate dietary recommendations represent a key part of secondary prevention in cardiovascular disease (CVD). We evaluated the effectiveness of the implementation of a nutritional program on quality of diet, cardiovascular events, and death in patients with established CVD.

Methods: In this open-label, multicenter trial conducted in 35 sites in Brazil, we randomly assigned (1:1) patients aged 45 years or older to receive either the BALANCE Program (experimental group) or conventional nutrition advice (control group). The BALANCE Program included a unique nutritional education strategy to implement recommendations from guidelines, adapted to the use of affordable and regional foods. Adherence to diet was evaluated by the modified Alternative Healthy Eating Index. The primary end point was a composite of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular death, cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, stroke, myocardial revascularization, amputation, or hospitalization for unstable angina. Secondary end points included biochemical and anthropometric data, and blood pressure levels.

Results: From March 5, 2013, to Abril 7, 2015, a total of 2534 eligible patients were randomly assigned to either the BALANCE Program group (n = 1,266) or the control group (n = 1,268) and were followed up for a median of 3.5 years. In total, 235 (9.3%) participants had been lost to follow-up. After 3 years of follow-up, mean modified Alternative Healthy Eating Index (scale 0-70) was only slightly higher in the BALANCE group versus the control group (26.2 ± 8.4 vs 24.7 ± 8.6, P < .01), mainly due to a 0.5-serving/d greater intake of fruits and of vegetables in the BALANCE group. Primary end point events occurred in 236 participants (18.8%) in the BALANCE group and in 207 participants (16.4%) in the control group (hazard ratio, 1.15; 95% CI 0.95-1.38; P = .15). Secondary end points did not differ between groups after follow-up.

Conclusions: The BALANCE Program only slightly improved adherence to a healthy diet in patients with established CVD and had no significant effect on the incidence of cardiovascular events or death.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2019.06.010DOI Listing
September 2019

The Brazilian Cardioprotective Nutritional Program to reduce events and risk factors in secondary prevention for cardiovascular disease: study protocol (The BALANCE Program Trial).

Am Heart J 2016 Jan 15;171(1):73-81.e1-2. Epub 2015 Aug 15.

Research Institute, Hospital do Coração (IP-HCor), São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

This article reports the rationale for the Brazilian Cardioprotective Nutritional Program (BALANCE Program) Trial. This pragmatic, multicenter, nationwide, randomized, concealed, controlled trial was designed to investigate the effects of the BALANCE Program in reducing cardiovascular events. The BALANCE Program consists of a prescribed diet guided by nutritional content recommendations from Brazilian national guidelines using a unique nutritional education strategy, which includes suggestions of affordable foods. In addition, the Program focuses on intensive follow-up through one-on-one visits, group sessions, and phone calls. In this trial, participants 45 years or older with any evidence of established cardiovascular disease will be randomized to the BALANCE or control groups. Those in the BALANCE group will receive the afore mentioned program interventions, while controls will be given generic advice on how to follow a low-fat, low-energy, low-sodium, and low-cholesterol diet, with a view to achieving Brazilian nutritional guideline recommendations. The primary outcome is a composite of death (any cause), cardiac arrest, acute myocardial infarction, stroke, myocardial revascularization, amputation for peripheral arterial disease, or hospitalization for unstable angina. A total of 2468 patients will be enrolled in 34 sites and followed up for up to 48 months. If the BALANCE Program is found to decrease cardiovascular events and reduce risk factors, this may represent an advance in the care of patients with cardiovascular disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2015.08.010DOI Listing
January 2016

Sarcopenia in chronic kidney disease on conservative therapy: prevalence and association with mortality.

Nephrol Dial Transplant 2015 Oct 21;30(10):1718-25. Epub 2015 May 21.

Nutrition Program and Nephrology Division, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Background: In chronic kidney disease (CKD), multiple metabolic and nutritional abnormalities contribute to the impairment of skeletal muscle mass and function thus predisposing patients to the condition of sarcopenia. Herein, we investigated the prevalence and mortality predictive power of sarcopenia, defined by three different methods, in non-dialysis-dependent (NDD) CKD patients.

Methods: We evaluated 287 NDD-CKD patients in stages 3-5 [59.9 ± 10.5 years; 62% men; 49% diabetics; glomerular filtration rate (GFR) 25.0 ± 15.8 mL/min/1.73 m(2)]. Sarcopenia was defined as reduced muscle function assessed by handgrip strength (HGS <30th percentile of a population-based reference adjusted for sex and age) plus diminished muscle mass assessed by three different methods: (i) midarm muscle circumference (MAMC) <90% of reference value (A), (ii) muscle wasting by subjective global assessment (B) and (iii) reduced skeletal muscle mass index (<10.76 kg/m² men; <6.76 kg/m² women) estimated by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) (C). Patients were followed for up to 40 months for all-cause mortality, and there was no loss of follow-up.

Results: The prevalence of sarcopenia was 9.8% (A), 9.4% (B) and 5.9% (C). The kappa agreement between the methods were 0.69 (A versus B), 0.49 (A versus C) and 0.46 (B versus C). During follow-up, 51 patients (18%) died, and the frequency of sarcopenia was significantly higher among non-survivors. In crude Cox analysis, sarcopenia diagnosed by the three methods was associated with a higher hazard for mortality; however, only sarcopenia diagnosed by method C remained as a predictor of mortality after multivariate adjustment.

Conclusions: The prevalence of sarcopenia in CKD patients on conservative therapy varies according to the method applied. Sarcopenia defined as reduced handgrip strength and low skeletal muscle mass index estimated by BIA was an independent predictor of mortality in these patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ndt/gfv133DOI Listing
October 2015

Diagnostic validation and prognostic significance of the Malnutrition-Inflammation Score in nondialyzed chronic kidney disease patients.

Nephrol Dial Transplant 2015 May 18;30(5):821-8. Epub 2014 Dec 18.

Department of Hypertension and Nephrology, Dante Pazzanese Institute of Cardiology, São Paulo, Brazil.

Background: Malnutrition and inflammation are highly prevalent and intimately linked conditions in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients that lead to a state of protein-energy wasting (PEW), the severity of which can be assessed by the Malnutrition-Inflammation Score (MIS). Here, we applied MIS and validated, for the first time, its ability to grade PEW and predict mortality in nondialyzed CKD patients.

Methods: We cross-sectionally evaluated 300 CKD stages 3-5 patients [median age 61 (53-68) years; estimated glomerular filtration rate 18 (12-27) mL/min/1.73 m(2); 63% men] referred for the first time to our center. Patients were followed during a median 30 (18-37) months for all-cause mortality.

Results: A worsening in MIS scale was associated with inflammatory biomarkers increase (i.e. alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, fibrinogen, ferritin and C-reactive protein) as well as a progressive deterioration in various MIS-independent indicators of nutritional status based on anthropometrics, dynamometry, urea kinetics and bioelectric impedance analysis. A structural equation model with two latent variables (assessing simultaneously malnutrition and inflammation factors) demonstrated good fit to the observed data. During a follow-up, 71 deaths were recorded; patients with higher MIS were at increased mortality risk in both crude and adjusted Cox models.

Conclusions: MIS appears to be a useful tool to assess PEW in nondialyzed CKD patients. In addition, MIS identified patients at increased mortality risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ndt/gfu380DOI Listing
May 2015

Clinical determinants and prognostic significance of the electrocardiographic strain pattern in chronic kidney disease patients.

J Am Soc Hypertens 2014 May 26;8(5):312-20. Epub 2014 Feb 26.

Divisions of Renal Medicine and Baxter Novum, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

The electrocardiographic (ECG) strain pattern (Strain) is a marker of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) severity that provides additional prognostic information beyond echocardiography (ECHO) in the community level. We sought to evaluate its clinical determinants and prognostic usefulness in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. We evaluated 284 non-dialysis-dependent patients with CKD stages 3 to 5 (mean age, 61 years [interquartile range, 53-67 years]; 62% men). Patients were followed for 23 months (range, 13-32 months) for cardiovascular (CV) events and/or death. Strain patients (n = 37; 13%) were using more antihypertensive drugs, had higher prevalence of peripheral vascular disease and smoking, and higher levels of C-reactive protein, cardiac troponin, and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). The independent predictors of Strain were: left ventricular mass index (LVMI), BNP, and smoking. During follow-up, there were 44 cardiovascular events (fatal and non-fatal) and 22 non-CV deaths; and Strain was associated with a worse prognosis independently of LVMI. Adding Strain to a prognostic model of LVMI improved in 15% the risk discrimination for the composite endpoint and in 12% for the CV events. Strain associates with CV risk factors and adds prognostic information over and above that of ECHO-assessed LVMI. Its routine screening may allow early identification of high risk CKD patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jash.2014.02.011DOI Listing
May 2014

Reliability of electrocardiographic surrogates of left ventricular mass in patients with chronic kidney disease.

J Hypertens 2014 Feb;32(2):439-45

aDepartment of Hypertension and Nephrology, Dante Pazzanese Institute of Cardiology, São Paulo, Brazil bDivisions of Renal Medicine and Baxter Novum, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden cDepartment of Echocardiography dDepartment of Nutrition, Dante Pazzanese Institute of Cardiology, São Paulo, Brazil eCenter for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Objective: Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is a prevalent condition in chronic kidney disease (CKD) very often underdiagnosed and misdiagnosed. Electrocardiography (ECG) is an easily accessible LVH diagnostic tool. We evaluated the usefulness of commonly applied ECG criteria for LVH diagnosis in CKD patients.

Methods: Cross-sectional evaluation of 253 nondialysis-dependent CKD stages 3-5 patients (61 [53-67] years; 65% men). Left ventricular mass (LVM) was assessed by echocardiography (ECHO). ECG was performed to assess Cornell voltage and Sokolow-Lyon voltage and their products (Cornell product and Sokolow-Lyon product, respectively).

Results: The prevalence of LVH ranged from 72 to 89% depending on ECHO criteria used. Cornell product showed the best correlation with ECHO-estimated LVM (ρ = 0.41; P <0.001). Across sex-specific tertiles of ECHO-LVM, ECG criteria increased and patients were more often hypertensive, obese, fluid overloaded, inflamed, and with higher albuminuria. Cornell product showed the strongest association with ECHO-LVM in crude and adjusted regression models, and the higher predictive performance for all the ECHO-based LVH definitions. However, when applying literature-based ECG cut-offs for LVH diagnosis, Sokolow-Lyon product showed a higher specificity. The agreement between ECG criteria cut-offs and ECHO-based definitions of LVH was in general poor, and the number of patients reclassified correctly by ECHO ranged from 77 to 94%.

Conclusion: Our data suggest that ECG alone is a weak indicator of LVH, and do not support its routine use as a unique tool in the screening of LVH in CKD patients. Further studies are needed to confirm these results and to try establishing adequate cut-offs for LVH diagnosis in this population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HJH.0000000000000026DOI Listing
February 2014

Malnutrition-inflammation score is associated with handgrip strength in nondialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease patients.

J Ren Nutr 2013 Jul 6;23(4):283-7. Epub 2012 Oct 6.

Dante Pazzanese Institute of Cardiology, Department of Nutrition, São Paulo, Brazil.

Objective: The malnutrition-inflammation score (MIS) is a nutritional scoring system that has been associated with muscle strength among dialysis patients. We aimed to test whether MIS is able to predict muscle strength in nondialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (NDD-CKD) individuals.

Design And Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at the Dante Pazzanese Institute of Cardiology, Hypertension, and Nephrology Division outpatient clinic. We evaluated 190 patients with NDD-CKD stages 2-5 (median 59.5 [interquartile range 51.4-66.9] years; 64% men). MIS was calculated without computing dialysis vintage to the scoring. HGS was assessed in the dominant arm. Anthropometric, laboratory, and body composition parameters were recorded.

Results: A strong negative correlation was found between HGS and MIS (r = -0.42; P ≤ .001) in univariate analysis. In multivariate regressions, adjustment for age, sex, diabetes, glomerular filtration rate, body cell mass, and C-reactive protein did not materially diminish these relationships.

Conclusions: MIS shares strong links with objective measures of muscle strength in NDD-CKD patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.jrn.2012.08.004DOI Listing
July 2013
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