Publications by authors named "Ferdinand Haslbauer"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Efficacy and safety of everolimus plus exemestane in patients with HR+, HER2- advanced breast cancer progressing on/after prior endocrine therapy in routine clinical practice: Primary results from the non-interventional study, STEPAUT.

Breast 2020 Apr 31;50:64-70. Epub 2020 Jan 31.

Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. Electronic address:

Background: STEPAUT, an Austrian non-interventional study, evaluated the safety and efficacy of everolimus plus exemestane in patients with hormone receptor-positive (HR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HER2-) advanced breast cancer (ABC) recurring/progressing on/after nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitors (NSAIs) in routine clinical practice.

Methods: Postmenopausal women with HR+, HER2- ABC progressing on/after NSAIs receiving everolimus plus exemestane in accordance with routine practice and the current version of Summary of Product Characteristics were eligible. Planned individual observation period corresponded to the duration of treatment until formal study end.

Results: Overall, 236 patients (median age: 65 years) were enrolled at 17 sites across Austria. The median progression-free survival (mPFS) in the overall population was 9.5 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.6-10.7 months). The mPFS (95% CI) in patients who received everolimus 10 and 5 mg was 9.9 months (7.3-11.5 months) and 8 months (4.7-10.7 months), respectively. The median time to progression was numerically longer in patients who had a therapy break (11.9 months, 95% CI: 10.0-14.6 months) versus those who did not have any therapy break (10.7 months, 95% CI: 8.9-12.6 months). Patients experienced grade 1 (53.7%), grade 2 (35.9%), grade 3 (9.9%), grade 4 (0.2%) adverse events (AEs). The most common AEs of any grade were stomatitis, mucositis (53.8%), rash, exanthema (29.7%), loss of appetite, nausea (28.4%).

Conclusions: Real-world safety and efficacy data from STEPAUT were consistent with results from BOLERO-2, supporting everolimus plus exemestane as a suitable treatment option for HR+, HER2- ABC recurring/progressing on/after NSAIs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.breast.2020.01.035DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7375626PMC
April 2020

Prospective observational study to evaluate the persistence of treatment with denosumab in patients with bone metastases from solid tumors in routine clinical practice: final analysis.

Support Care Cancer 2020 Apr 26;28(4):1855-1865. Epub 2019 Jul 26.

Paracelsus Medizinische Privatuniversität, Salzburger Landeskliniken - Universitätsklinikum Salzburg, Salzburg Cancer Research Institute, Salzburg, Austria.

Purpose: In the integrated analysis of phase III head-to-head trials in patients with advanced solid tumors, denosumab demonstrated superiority over zoledronic acid in preventing skeletal-related events (SREs). Regular and continued drug use (persistence) is a precondition of clinical efficacy; persistence in real-life is yet undetermined for denosumab.

Methods: This was a single-arm, prospective, observational, non-interventional study in 598 patients with bone metastases from breast, prostate, lung, or other solid tumors treated with denosumab every four weeks in real-world clinical practice in Austria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovakia, and Bulgaria. Persistence was defined as denosumab administration at ≤ 35-day intervals over 24 or 48 weeks, respectively.

Results: Previous SREs were found in 10.9% of patients. 62.6% were persistent over 24 weeks and 40.1% over 48 weeks. The Kaplan-Meier median (95% CI) time to non-persistence was 274.0 days (232.0, 316.0). The most frequent reason for non-persistence was delayed administration. There was a trend towards weaker analgesics over time, with approximately 60% of patients not requiring any analgesics. Serum calcium remained within the normal range throughout the study. Adjudicated osteonecrosis of the jaw was documented in three patients with an incidence per patient-year (95% CI) of 0.012 (0.004, 0.029).

Conclusions: Most patients received denosumab regularly once every four weeks over 24 weeks of treatment. Non-persistence was mainly due to delayed administration. The incidence of adverse drug reactions, especially of osteonecrosis of the jaw, was in line with expectations from previous studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-019-04988-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7036060PMC
April 2020

Adjuvant denosumab in postmenopausal patients with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer (ABCSG-18): disease-free survival results from a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial.

Lancet Oncol 2019 03 19;20(3):339-351. Epub 2019 Feb 19.

Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Background: In postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive, early-stage breast cancer, treatment with adjuvant aromatase inhibitors is the standard of care, but it increases risk for osteoporosis and fractures. Results from the ABCSG-18 trial showed that use of denosumab as an adjuvant to aromatase inhibitor therapy significantly reduced clinical fractures. Disease-free survival outcomes from ABCSG-18 have not yet been reported.

Methods: Postmenopausal patients with early, hormone receptor-positive, non-metastatic adenocarcinoma of the breast, who had completed their initial adjuvant treatment pathway (surgery, radiotherapy, or chemotherapy, or a combination) and were receiving adjuvant aromatase inhibitors, were enrolled at 58 trial centres in Austria and Sweden into this prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial. With permuted block randomisation (block sizes 2 and 4, stratified by previous aromatase inhibitor use, total lumbar spine bone mineral density score at baseline, and type of centre), patients were assigned (1:1) to receive subcutaneous denosumab (60 mg) or matching placebo every 6 months during aromatase inhibitor therapy. The primary endpoint (previously reported) was the time to first clinical fracture after randomisation. The secondary endpoint reported here is disease-free survival (defined as time from randomisation to first evidence of local or distant metastasis, contralateral breast cancer, secondary carcinoma, or death from any cause) in the intention-to-treat population. This study is registered with EudraCT (number 2005-005275-15) and ClinicalTrials.gov (number NCT00556374), and is ongoing for long-term follow-up.

Findings: Between Dec 18, 2006, and July 22, 2013, 3425 eligible patients were enrolled and randomly assigned; 1711 to the denosumab group and 1709 to the placebo group (with five others withdrawing consent). After a median follow-up of 73 months (IQR 58-95), 240 (14·0%) patients in the denosumab and 287 (16·8%) in the placebo group had disease-free survival events. Disease-free survival was significantly improved in the denosumab group versus the placebo group (hazard ratio 0·82, 95% CI 0·69-0·98, Cox p=0·0260; descriptive analysis, without controlling for multiplicity). In the denosumab group, disease-free survival was 89·2% (95% CI 87·6-90·8) at 5 years and 80·6% (78·1-83·1) at 8 years of follow-up, compared with 87·3% (85·7-89·0) at 5 years and 77·5% (74·8-80·2) and 8 years in the placebo group. No independently adjudicated cases of osteonecrosis of the jaw or confirmed atypical femoral fractures were recorded. The total number of adverse events was similar in the denosumab group (1367 [including 521 serious] adverse events) and the placebo group (1339 [515 serious]). The most common serious adverse events were osteoarthritis (62 [3·6%] of 1709 in the denosumab group vs 58 [3·4%] of 1690 in the placebo group), meniscus injury (23 [1·3%] vs 24 [1·4%]), and cataract (16 [0·9%] vs 28 [1·7%]). One (<0·1%) treatment-related death (due to pneumonia, septic kidney failure, and cardiac decompensation) occurred in the denosumab group.

Interpretation: Denosumab constitutes an effective and safe adjuvant treatment for patients with postmenopausal hormone receptor-positive early breast cancer receiving aromatase inhibitor therapy.

Funding: Amgen.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1470-2045(18)30862-3DOI Listing
March 2019

Long-Term Progression-Free Survival in a Patient with Metastatic Leiomyosarcoma of the Inguinal Region Treated with Trabectedin.

Case Rep Oncol 2018 Jan-Apr;11(1):246-251. Epub 2018 Apr 19.

Tumor Center, Salzkammergut-Klinikum Vöcklabruck, Vöcklabruck, Austria.

Presented here is the case of an elderly leiomyosarcoma patient with multiple comorbidities and relapses from prior lines of treatment, who experienced a long-lasting progression-free survival. After initial diagnosis, standard treatment protocols with surgery and subsequent adjuvant radiochemotherapy were administered, followed by a short course of oral pazopanib at the patient's request, which led to a rapid relapse. Afterwards, the patient received trabectedin for 22 months, achieving disease control with good quality of life over an extended period of time. After progression from trabectedin, the patient was switched to eribulin. Future clinical trials are needed to investigate the efficacy of trabectedin maintenance treatment and to identify predictive criteria for response to trabectedin among patients with advanced sarcoma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000487937DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5968288PMC
April 2018

Results of a prospective dose intensity and neutropenia prophylaxis evaluation programme (DIEPP) in cancer patients at risk of febrile neutropenia due to myelosuppressive chemotherapy.

Wien Klin Wochenschr 2016 Apr 8;128(7-8):238-47. Epub 2016 Jan 8.

Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Objective: To describe the incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN) and use of pegfilgrastim in cancer patients with high overall risk of FN and to investigate the relationship between granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) guideline adherence and chemotherapy delivery in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) and Austria.

Methods: Dose Intensity Evaluation Program and Prophylaxis (DIEPP) was a multicentre, prospective, and observational study of adult patients with breast cancer, lymphoma, lung cancer, gastric cancer, and ovarian cancer, who received chemotherapy with pegfilgrastim support and who had an overall risk of FN ≥ 20 %. Physicians assessed patient risk factors and reported their reasons for administering pegfilgrastim.

Results: Patients were enrolled from 113 centres in CEE and Austria between August 2010 and July 2013, and data were analysed from 1072 patients. The most common tumour types were breast cancer (50 %) and lymphoma (24 %). FN incidence was 5 % overall. FN occurred in 3 % of patients (28/875) who received pegfilgrastim as primary prophylaxis (PP) and 13 % of patients (19/142) who received it as secondary prophylaxis (SP); 79 % of FN events in SP patients occurred in the first cycle before pegfilgrastim was administered. The three most frequently chosen reasons for using pegfilgrastim were planned chemotherapy with high FN risk, female gender, and advanced disease. Overall, 40 % of patients received > 90 % of their planned chemotherapy dose within 3 days of the planned schedule.

Conclusion: FN incidence was relatively low with pegfilgrastim PP in patients with a physician-assessed overall FN risk of ≥ 20 %. The most important reasons for pegfilgrastim use were consistent with the investigators' risk assessment and international guidelines.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00508-015-0917-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4861750PMC
April 2016

Adjuvant denosumab in breast cancer (ABCSG-18): a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

Lancet 2015 Aug 31;386(9992):433-43. Epub 2015 May 31.

Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Background: Adjuvant endocrine therapy compromises bone health in patients with breast cancer, causing osteopenia, osteoporosis, and fractures. Antiresorptive treatments such as bisphosphonates prevent and counteract these side-effects. In this trial, we aimed to investigate the effects of the anti-RANK ligand antibody denosumab in postmenopausal, aromatase inhibitor-treated patients with early-stage hormone receptor-positive breast cancer.

Methods: In this prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial, postmenopausal patients with early hormone receptor-positive breast cancer receiving treatment with aromatase inhibitors were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive either denosumab 60 mg or placebo administered subcutaneously every 6 months in 58 trial centres in Austria and Sweden. Patients were assigned by an interactive voice response system. The randomisation schedule used a randomly permuted block design with block sizes 2 and 4, stratified by type of hospital regarding Hologic device for DXA scans, previous aromatase inhibitor use, and baseline bone mineral density. Patients, treating physicians, investigators, data managers, and all study personnel were masked to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was time from randomisation to first clinical fracture, analysed by intention to treat. As an additional sensitivity analysis, we also analysed the primary endpoint on the per-protocol population. Patients were treated until the prespecified number of 247 first clinical fractures was reached. This trial is ongoing (patients are in follow-up) and is registered with the European Clinical Trials Database, number 2005-005275-15, and with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00556374.

Findings: Between Dec 18, 2006, and July 22, 2013, 3425 eligible patients were enrolled into the trial, of whom 3420 were randomly assigned to receive denosumab 60 mg (n=1711) or placebo (n=1709) subcutaneously every 6 months. Compared with the placebo group, patients in the denosumab group had a significantly delayed time to first clinical fracture (hazard ratio [HR] 0·50 [95% CI 0·39-0·65], p<0·0001). The overall lower number of fractures in the denosumab group (92) than in the placebo group (176) was similar in all patient subgroups, including in patients with a bone mineral density T-score of -1 or higher at baseline (n=1872, HR 0·44 [95% CI 0·31-0·64], p<0·0001) and in those with a bone mineral density T-score of less than -1 already at baseline (n=1548, HR 0·57 [95% CI 0·40-0·82], p=0·002). The patient incidence of adverse events in the safety analysis set (all patients who received at least one dose of study drug) did not differ between the denosumab group (1366 events, 80%) and the placebo group (1334 events, 79%), nor did the numbers of serious adverse events (521 vs 511 [30% in each group]). The main adverse events were arthralgia and other aromatase-inhibitor related symptoms; no additional toxicity from the study drug was reported. Despite proactive adjudication of every potential osteonecrosis of the jaw by an international expert panel, no cases of osteonecrosis of the jaw were reported. 93 patients (3% of the full analysis set) died during the study, of which one death (in the denosumab group) was thought to be related to the study drug.

Interpretation: Adjuvant denosumab 60 mg twice per year reduces the risk of clinical fractures in postmenopausal women with breast cancer receiving aromatase inhibitors, and can be administered without added toxicity. Since a main side-effect of adjuvant breast cancer treatment can be substantially reduced by the addition of denosumab, this treatment should be considered for clinical practice.

Funding: Amgen.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(15)60995-3DOI Listing
August 2015

Anemia prevalence and treatment practice in patients with non-myeloid tumors receiving chemotherapy.

Cancer Manag Res 2013 2;5:205-14. Epub 2013 Aug 2.

Department of Medical Oncology, Ospedale Civile S, Bortolo, Vicenza.

Purpose: To describe the prevalence and management of anemia in cancer patients.

Methods: This cross-sectional, observational survey was conducted in Italy and Austria. Centers prespecified one day, during a 4-month enrollment window, to report specific data collected during normal clinical practice for patients with non-myeloid tumors attending for chemotherapy (±radiotherapy) treatment. The primary endpoint was the prevalence of anemia as determined using a prespecified algorithm: hemoglobin (Hb) ≤10 g/dL on/within 3 days prior to visit; ongoing anemia treatment; physician diagnosis of anemia, together with ≥1 anemia symptom.

Results: Between November 18, 2010 and March 18, 2011, data for 1412 patients were collected (Italy n = 1130; Austria n = 282). Most patients (n = 1136; 80%) had solid tumors; 809 (57%) had received ≤3 chemotherapy cycles. The prevalence of anemia was 32% (95% confidence interval: 29.4%-34.2%); 196 patients (14%) were deemed anemic based on Hb ≤10 g/dL, 131 (9%) on ongoing anemia treatment, and 121 (9%) on physician diagnosis/anemia symptom. Overall, 1153 patients (82%) had Hb data; mean (standard deviation [SD]) Hb levels were 11.7 (1.7) g/dL. In total, 456 patients (32%) had anemia symptoms: fatigue (n = 392; 28%), depression (n = 122; 9%), and dyspnea (n = 107; 8%) were most common. Fifty-one patients (4%) had had their current chemotherapy cycle delayed due to anemia. On visit day, or ≤28 days prior, 91 (6%), 188 (13%), and 81 patients (6%) had evidence of whole blood/red blood cell transfusion, erythropoiesis-stimulating agent use, or iron use, respectively.

Conclusion: On the prespecified study day, one-third of patients with non-myeloid tumors undergoing chemotherapy were found to be anemic and 13% had evidence of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent use then or in the 28 days prior.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CMAR.S45236DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3739422PMC
August 2013

Successful alemtuzumab retreatment in progressive B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a multicenter survey in 30 patients.

Ann Hematol 2011 Sep 25;90(9):1083-91. Epub 2011 Feb 25.

Department of Internal Medicine V, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria.

Although retreatment with alemtuzumab in relapsing B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) may be beneficial, there has thus far been no thorough analysis available on this topic. Data were collected from 30 chemotherapy-pretreated patients with progressive CLL who had received alemtuzumab twice in consecutive, distinct therapy lines. The median dose of alemtuzumab retreatment was 402 mg (range, 43-1,090 mg). Retreatment with alemtuzumab induced an overall response rate of 47%. From the start of alemtuzumab retreatment, median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 6.3 and 20.0 months, respectively. Response rates, PFS and OS upon alemtuzumab retreatment were correlated with response to initial alemtuzumab treatment, the time interval between the initial course of alemtuzumab and start of retreatment, and the hemoglobin concentration prior to retreatment. Reported toxicities from 24 cases included infections (50%), febrile reactions upon alemtuzumab administration (38%), exanthema (21%), and grade 4 neutropenia (13%) and thrombocytopenia (17%). We conclude that alemtuzumab retreatment represents an effective and tolerable therapeutic option for selected patients with CLL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00277-011-1192-5DOI Listing
September 2011

Routine clinical use of alemtuzumab in patients with heavily pretreated B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a nation-wide retrospective study in Austria.

Cancer 2006 Nov;107(10):2408-16

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hemato-Oncology, University Hospital of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.

Background: In previous studies, alemtuzumab demonstrated considerable activity in patients with previously treated B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), including fludarabine-refractory disease. In this retrospective study, the authors evaluated the benefit of alemtuzumab monotherapy in unselected patients with advanced, previously treated CLL who received treatment in the routine clinical setting.

Methods: Data were collected from 115 consecutive patients who received alemtuzumab therapy at 25 participating centers in Austria. Patients received a median of 3 prior lines of therapy (range, 1-11 prior lines of therapy), and 59% had fludarabine-refractory disease. Alemtuzumab was administered intravenously or subcutaneously with a planned schedule of 30 mg 3 times per week for up to 12 weeks. Patients received valacyclovir and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole for antiinfective prophylaxis.

Results: The overall response rate was 23%, with complete responses achieved in 5% of patients. Stable disease (SD) was achieved in 36% of patients. After a median follow-up of 17.5 months, the median overall survival (OS) was 20.2 months for all patients. A multivariate Cox regression analysis that included pretreatment baseline characteristics, response to therapy, and cumulative dose of alemtuzumab indicated that bulky lymphadenopathy, the administration of > r =3 previous therapies, and lack of response to alemtuzumab remained significant independent risk factors for inferior OS. The median OS had not been reached for responding patients. The median OS was 29.5 months for patients with SD and 10.8 months for patients with progressive disease.

Conclusions: The broad use of alemtuzumab in the routine clinical practice setting is feasible and active in unselected patients with pretreated CLL, and the current results confirmed the activity and safety of this agent, as reported in previously published clinical studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.22263DOI Listing
November 2006