Publications by authors named "Felix Gómez"

9 Publications

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A Human Support Robot for the Cleaning and Maintenance of Door Handles Using a Deep-Learning Framework.

Sensors (Basel) 2020 Jun 23;20(12). Epub 2020 Jun 23.

Engineering Product Development Pillar, Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD), Singapore 487372, Singapore.

The role of mobile robots for cleaning and sanitation purposes is increasing worldwide. Disinfection and hygiene are two integral parts of any safe indoor environment, and these factors become more critical in COVID-19-like pandemic situations. Door handles are highly sensitive contact points that are prone to be contamination. Automation of the door-handle cleaning task is not only important for ensuring safety, but also to improve efficiency. This work proposes an AI-enabled framework for automating cleaning tasks through a Human Support Robot (HSR). The overall cleaning process involves mobile base motion, door-handle detection, and control of the HSR manipulator for the completion of the cleaning tasks. The detection part exploits a deep-learning technique to classify the image space, and provides a set of coordinates for the robot. The cooperative control between the spraying and wiping is developed in the Robotic Operating System. The control module uses the information obtained from the detection module to generate a task/operational space for the robot, along with evaluating the desired position to actuate the manipulators. The complete strategy is validated through numerical simulations, and experiments on a Toyota HSR platform.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/s20123543DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7349910PMC
June 2020

Vision Based Wall Following Framework: A Case Study With HSR Robot for Cleaning Application.

Sensors (Basel) 2020 Jun 10;20(11). Epub 2020 Jun 10.

Engineering Product Development Pillar, Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD); Singapore 487372, Singapore.

Periodic cleaning of all frequently touched social areas such as walls, doors, locks, handles, windows has become the first line of defense against all infectious diseases. Among those, cleaning of large wall areas manually is always tedious, time-consuming, and astounding task. Although numerous cleaning companies are interested in deploying robotic cleaning solutions, they are mostly not addressing wall cleaning. To this end, we are proposing a new vision-based wall following framework that acts as an add-on for any professional robotic platform to perform wall cleaning. The proposed framework uses Deep Learning (DL) framework to visually detect, classify, and segment the wall/floor surface and instructs the robot to wall follow to execute the cleaning task. Also, we summarized the system architecture of Toyota Human Support Robot (HSR), which has been used as our testing platform. We evaluated the performance of the proposed framework on HSR robot under various defined scenarios. Our experimental results indicate that the proposed framework could successfully classify and segment the wall/floor surface and also detect the obstacle on wall and floor with high detection accuracy and demonstrates a robust behavior of wall following.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/s20113298DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7308965PMC
June 2020

Photoinhibition of Biofilm-Induced Lesions in Human Dentin by Violet-Blue Light.

Dent J (Basel) 2019 Dec 11;7(4). Epub 2019 Dec 11.

Department of Biomedical Sciences and Comprehensive Care, Indiana University School of Dentistry, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA.

This in vitro study determined the effectiveness of violet-blue light on (UA159) biofilm induced dentinal lesions. Biofilm was formed on human dentin specimens in a 96-well microtiter plate and incubated for 13 h in the presence of tryptic soy broth (TSB) or TSB supplemented with 1% sucrose (TSBS). Violet-blue light (405 nm) from quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) was used to irradiate the biofilm. Supernatant liquid was removed, and the biofilm was irradiated continuously with QLF for 5 min twice daily with an interval of 6 h for 5 d, except with one treatment on the final day. Colony forming units (CFU) of the treated biofilm, changes in fluorescence (∆F; QLF-Digital Biluminator), lesion depth (L), and integrated mineral loss (∆Z; both transverse microradiography) were quantified at the end of the fifth day. Statistical analysis used analysis of variance (ANOVA), testing at a 5% significance level. In the violet-blue light irradiated groups, there was a significant reduction ( < 0.05) of bacterial viability (CFU) of with TSB and TSBS. Violet-blue light irradiation resulted in the reduction of ∆F and L of the dentinal surface with TSBS. These results indicate that violet-blue light has the capacity to reduce cell numbers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/dj7040113DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6960986PMC
December 2019

Effect of Violet-Blue Light on Streptococcus mutans-Induced Enamel Demineralization.

Dent J (Basel) 2018 Mar 21;6(2). Epub 2018 Mar 21.

Department of Biomedical and Applied Sciences, Indiana University School of Dentistry, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA.

Background: This in vitro study determined the effectiveness of violet-blue light (405 nm) on inhibiting -induced enamel demineralization.

Materials And Methods: UA159 biofilm was grown on human enamel specimens for 13 h in 5% CO₂ at 37 °C with/without 1% sucrose. Wet biofilm was treated twice daily with violet-blue light for five minutes over five days. A six-hour reincubation was included daily between treatments excluding the final day. Biofilms were harvested and colony forming units (CFU) were quantitated. Lesion depth () and mineral loss (∆) were quantified using transverse microradiography (TMR). Quantitative light-induced fluorescence Biluminator (QLF-D) was used to determine mean fluorescence loss. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) to compare differences in means.

Results: The results demonstrated a significant reduction in CFUs between treated and non-treated groups grown with/without 1% sucrose. ∆ was significantly reduced for specimens exposed to biofilms grown without sucrose with violet-blue light. There was only a trend on reduction of ∆ with sucrose and with on both groups. There were no differences in fluorescence-derived parameters between the groups.

Conclusions: Within the limitations of the study, the results indicate that violet-blue light can serve as an adjunct prophylactic treatment for reducing biofilm formation and enamel mineral loss.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/dj6020006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6023538PMC
March 2018

Orange/Red Fluorescence of Active Caries by Retrospective Quantitative Light-Induced Fluorescence Image Analysis.

Caries Res 2016 11;50(3):295-302. Epub 2016 May 11.

Department of Oral Biology, Indiana University School of Dentistry, Indianapolis, Ind., USA.

This retrospective clinical study determined the association of caries activity and orange/red fluorescence on quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) images of surfaces that progressed to cavitation, as determined by clinical visual examination. A random sample of QLF images from 565 children (5-13 years) previously enrolled in a longitudinal study was selected. Buccal, lingual and occlusal surface images obtained after professional brushing at baseline and every 4 months over a 4-year period were analyzed for red fluorescence. Surfaces that progressed (n = 224) to cavitation according to the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS 0/1/2/3/4 to 5/6 or filling), and surfaces that did not progress (n = 486) were included. QA2 image analysis software outputs the percentage increase of the red/green components as x0394;R and area of x0394;R (areax0394;R) at different thresholds. Mixed-model ANOVA was used to compare progressive and nonprogressive surfaces to account for correlations of red fluorescence (x0394;R and areax0394;R) between surfaces within a subject. The first analysis used the first observation for each surface or the first available visit if the surface was unerupted (baseline), while the second analysis used the last observation prior to cavitation for surfaces that progressed and the last observation for surfaces that did not progress (final). There was a significant (p < 0.05) association between red fluorescence and progression to cavitation at thresholds x0394;R0, x0394;R10, x0394;R20, x0394;R60, x0394;R70, x0394;R80, x0394;R90 and x0394;Rmax at baseline and for x0394;R0 and x0394;R10 at the final observation. Quantification of orange/red fluorescence may help to identify lesions that progress to cavitation. Future studies identifying microbiological factors causing orange/ red fluorescence and its caries activity are indicated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000441899DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4925179PMC
October 2017

Durability of the Liotta porcine bioprosthesis beyond two decades.

J Heart Valve Dis 2011 Jul;20(4):439-41

Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Hospital Clinico, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.

Porcine valves are generally known to have a limited durability. The case is reported of a 35-year-old male patient who underwent mitral valve replacement with a 28 mm Liotta porcine bioprosthesis. At reoperation 21 years later, the bioprosthesis was replaced (uneventfully) with a second porcine bioprosthesis. Pathological and X-radiographic examinations of the excised valve demonstrated focal calcification of the leaflets, confirming the long-term durability of the Liotta porcine bioprosthesis.
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July 2011

Thoracoscopic pulmonary vein isolation in patients with atrial fibrillation and failed percutaneous ablation.

J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2010 Sep 1;140(3):633-8. Epub 2010 Feb 1.

Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Institut del Tòrax, Hospital Clínic, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.

Objective: Pulmonary vein isolation is indicated in patients with symptomatic isolated atrial fibrillation not controlled with antiarrhythmic therapy. We describe our surgical experience with thoracoscopic pulmonary vein isolation in patients in whom percutaneous ablation has failed.

Methods: Thirty-four adult patients with unsuccessful catheter ablations (range 1-4, mean 2 +/- 1) underwent thoracoscopic bipolar-radiofrequency pulmonary vein isolation. Seventeen patients had paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, 12 with persistent and 5 with long-standing persistent fibrillation, for a mean of 6 years (range 3-10 years), 13 years (5-25 years), and 9 years (3-15 years), respectively.

Results: There was no mortality during the procedure or follow-up (mean 16 +/- 11 months). Two patients needed conversion to thoracotomy owing to hemorrhage, and ablation could not be completed. Antiarrhythmic therapy was withdrawn 3 months postoperatively. Postoperative sinus rhythm was maintained in 82% of those with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (13/15 at 6 months, 9/11 at 12 months), 60% had persistent atrial fibrillation (8/12 at 6 months and 6/10 at 12 months), and 20% had long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation (1/5 at 6 and 12 months). Preoperative left atrial diameter significantly differed between patients with paroxysmal fibrillation (mean 42 +/- 6 mm) and those with persistent and long-standing persistent fibrillation (means 50 +/- 4 and 47 +/- 2 mm). Left atrial size greater than 45 mm and atrial fibrillation type were preoperative factors that significantly influenced outcome in the univariate logistic regression analysis.

Conclusions: Thoracoscopic pulmonary vein isolation in patients with previously unsuccessful catheter ablations demonstrates satisfactory sinus rhythm maintenance rates in paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation, but not in long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation. As with other minimally invasive surgical techniques, there is an important learning curve.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtcvs.2009.11.009DOI Listing
September 2010

Results of the 2003-2004 GEP-ISFG collaborative study on mitochondrial DNA: focus on the mtDNA profile of a mixed semen-saliva stain.

Forensic Sci Int 2006 Jul 21;160(2-3):157-67. Epub 2005 Oct 21.

Instituto Nacional de Toxicología y Ciencias Forenses, Servicio de Biología, Barcelona, Spain.

We report here a review of the seventh mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) exercise undertaken by the Spanish and Portuguese working group (GEP) of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG) corresponding to the period 2003-2004. Five reference bloodstains from five donors (M1-M5), a mixed stain of saliva and semen (M6), and a hair sample (M7) were submitted to each participating laboratory for nuclear DNA (nDNA; autosomal STR and Y-STR) and mtDNA analysis. Laboratories were asked to investigate the contributors of samples M6 and M7 among the reference donors (M1-M5). A total of 34 laboratories reported total or partial mtDNA sequence data from both, the reference bloodstains (M1-M5) and the hair sample (M7) concluding a match between mtDNA profiles of M5 and M7. Autosomal STR and Y-STR profiling was the preferred strategy to investigate the contributors of the semen/saliva mixture (M6). Nuclear DNA profiles were consistent with a mixture of saliva from the donor (female) of M4 and semen from donor M5, being the semen (XY) profile the dominant component of the mixture. Strikingly, and in contradiction to the nuclear DNA analysis, mtDNA sequencing results yield a more simple result: only the saliva contribution (M4) was detected, either after preferential lysis or after complete DNA digestion. Some labs provided with several explanations for this finding and carried out additional experiments to explain this apparent contradictory result. The results pointed to the existence of different relative amounts of nuclear and mtDNAs in saliva and semen. We conclude that this circumstance could strongly influence the interpretation of the mtDNA evidence in unbalanced mixtures and in consequence lead to false exclusions. During the GEP-ISFG annual conference a validation study was planned to progress in the interpretation of mtDNA from different mixtures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.forsciint.2005.09.005DOI Listing
July 2006

An evaluation of the application of infrared thermal imaging to the tele-diagnosis of sarcoptic mange in the Spanish ibex (Capra pyrenaica).

Vet Parasitol 2002 Oct;109(1-2):111-7

Departamento de Sanidad Animal, Universidad de Córdoba, 14071, Córdoba, Spain.

The application of infrared thermal imaging to the diagnosis of sarcoptic mange in the wild Spanish ibex (Capra pyrenaica) was evaluated. Seventy-three ibexes (35 males, 38 females) of varying ages were studied. Each animal was observed using conventional binoculars (OT) to detect lesions characteristic of mange. Infrared thermography (IR) was then performed and the resultant image judged negative or positive. The distance from the thermograph to the animal was measured, and the animal killed. Skin samples were taken for mite detection by routine laboratory diagnosis (LAB). The most sensitive and specific technique for the tele-diagnosis of sarcoptic mange in the Spanish ibex is OT, as it permits diagnosis over greater distances than IR, which sensitivity is impaired at distances >100m. When disease prevalence is low, such as in initial and final phases of an epidemic, a more sensitive technique would be valuable in detecting all affected animals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0304-4017(02)00248-0DOI Listing
October 2002