Publications by authors named "Felipe Vega Rivera"

7 Publications

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American Association for the Surgery of Trauma-World Society of Emergency Surgery guidelines on diagnosis and management of abdominal vascular injuries.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2020 12;89(6):1197-1211

From the Division of Trauma (L.K., J.S.), Surgical Critical Care, Burns, and Acute Care Surgery, University of California San Diego, San Diego; Comparative Effectiveness and Clinical Outcomes Research Center (R.C.), Riverside University Health System Medical Center, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Riverside, California; Vascular and Trauma Surgery (A.M.O.G. Jr.), Universidade Federal do Pará/Centro Universitário do Estado do Pará, Belém, PA, Brazil; Department of War Surgery (V.R.), Kirov Military Medical Academy, Saint Petersburg, Russia; Department of Surgery (E.E.M.), Ernest E. Moore Shock Trauma Center at Denver Health, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado; Division Chief Trauma and Acute Care Surgery (J.M.G.), Department of Surgery, University of California Davis, Sacramento, California; Department of Surgery, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, UAE University, Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates; Division of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, Department of Surgery (A.B.P.), University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania; Division of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, Department of Surgery (C.A.O.), Fundación Valle del Lili, Universidad del Valle, Cali, Colombia; Department of Surgery (R.V.M.), University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Department of Surgery (S.D.S.), University Hospital of Varese, University of Insubria, Italy; Division of Acute Care Surgery, Department of Surgery (R.I.), Virginia Commonwealth University Richmond, Virginia; Unit of Digestive and HPB Surgery (N.D.A.), CARE Department, Henri Mondor University Hospital (AP-HP) and Faculty of Medicine, University of Paris Est, UPEC, Creteil, France; R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center (T.S.), University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland; Emergency Surgery Department (F.C.), Parma University Hospital, Parma, Italy; Department of Surgery and Critical Care Medicine (A.K.), University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Department of Emergency Surgery (V.K.), City Hospital, Mozyr, Belarus; Departments of Surgery and Medicine (N.P.), Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario, Canada; Trauma Services (I.C.), Auckland City Hospital, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; Abdominal Center, Department of Surgery (A.L., M.S.), University Hospital Meilahti, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Digestive Surgery (M. Chirica), Grenoble University Hospital, Grenoble, France; 3rd Department of Surgery (E.P.), Attikon General Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece; Division of Trauma/Acute Care Surgery and Surgical Critical Care (G.P.F.), University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil; General, Emergency Surgery, and Trauma Center (M. Chiarugi), University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy; Department of General and Upper GI Surgery (D.D.), Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom; Dipartimento di Scienze Clinico Chirurgiche (E.C.), Diagnostiche e Pediatriche, University of Pavia, Pavia; General and Emergency Surgery Department (M. Ceresoli), School of Medicine and Surgery, Milano-Bicocca University, Monza, Italy; Service de Chirurgie Generale, Digestive, Metabolique Centre Hospitalier de Poissy (B.D.S.), St Germain en Laye, France; Departamento de Cirugía (F.V.-R.), Hospital Angeles Lomas, Curso Universitario Posgrado de Cirugía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico, Mexico; Department of Surgery (M.S.), Macerata Hospital (ASUR Marche), Macerata, Italy; Trauma Surgery Department (W.B.), Scripps Memorial Hospital, La Jolla, California; General Surgery Department (L.A.), Bufalini Hospital, Cesena, Italy; and Trauma Service, Department of General Surgery (D.G.W.), Royal Perth Hospital, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.

Abdominal vascular trauma accounts for a small percentage of military and a moderate percentage of civilian trauma, affecting all age ranges and impacting young adult men most frequently. Penetrating causes are more frequent than blunt in adults, while blunt mechanisms are more common among pediatric populations. High rates of associated injuries, bleeding, and hemorrhagic shock ensure that, despite advances in both diagnostic and therapeutic technologies, immediate open surgical repair remains the mainstay of treatment for traumatic abdominal vascular injuries. Because of their devastating nature, abdominal vascular injuries remain a significant source of morbidity and mortality among trauma patients. The American Association for the Surgery of Trauma in conjunction with the World Society of Emergency Surgery seek to summarize the literature to date and provide guidelines on the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of abdominal vascular injuries. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Review study, level IV.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000002968DOI Listing
December 2020

American Association for the Surgery of Trauma-World Society of Emergency Surgery guidelines on diagnosis and management of peripheral vascular injuries.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2020 12;89(6):1183-1196

From the Division of Trauma (L.K., J.S.), Surgical Critical Care, Burns, and Acute Care Surgery, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California; Comparative Effectiveness and Clinical Outcomes Research Center (R.C.), Riverside University Health System Medical Center, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Riverside, California; Vascular and Trauma Surgery (A.M.O.G. Jr.), Universidade Federal do Pará/Centro Universitário do Estado do Pará, Belém, PA, Brazil; Department of War Surgery (V.R.), Kirov Military Medical Academy, Saint Petersburg, Russia; Department of Surgery (E.E.M.), Ernest E. Moore Shock Trauma Center at Denver Health, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado; Division Chief Trauma and Acute Care Surgery (J.G.), Department of Surgery. University of California Davis, Sacramento, California; Department of Surgery (F.A.-Z.), College of Medicine and Health Sciences, UAE University, Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates; Division of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, Department of Surgery (A.B.P.), University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania; Division of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, Department of Surgery (C.O.), Fundación Valle del Lili, Universidad del Valle, Cali, Colombia; Department of Surgery (R.V.M.), University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Department of Surgery (S.D.S.), University Hospital of Varese, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy; Division of Acute Care Surgery, Department of Surgery (R.I.), Virginia Commonwealth University Richmond, Virginia; Unit of Digestive and HPB Surgery (N.D.A.), CARE Department, Henri Mondor University Hospital (AP-HP) and Faculty of Medicine, University of Paris Est, UPEC, Creteil, France; R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center (T.S.), University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland; Emergency Surgery Department (F.C.), Parma University Hospital, Parma, Italy; Department of Surgery and Critical Care Medicine (A.K.), University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Department of Emergency Surgery (V.K.), City Hospital, Mozyr, Belarus; Departments of Surgery and Medicine (N.P.), Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario, Canada; Trauma Services (I.C.), Auckland City Hospital, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; Abdominal Center, Department of Surgery (A.L.), University Hospital Meilahti, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Digestive Surgery (M. Chirica), Grenoble University Hospital, Grenoble, France; 3rd Department of Surgery (E.P.), Attikon General Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece; Division of Trauma/Acute Care Surgery and Surgical Critical Care (G.P.F.), University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil; General, Emergency Surgery, and Trauma Center (M. Chiarugi, F.C.), University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy; Department of General and Upper GI Surgery (D.D.), Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom; Dipartimento di Scienze Clinico Chirurgiche (E.C.), Diagnostiche e Pediatriche, University of Pavia, Pavia; General and Emergency Surgery Department (M. Ceresoli), School of Medicine and Surgery, Milano-Bicocca University, Monza, Italy; Service de Chirurgie Generale, Digestive, Metabolique Centre Hospitalier de Poissy (B.D.S.), St Germain en Laye, France; Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Curso Universitario Posgrado de Cirugía, Departamento de Cirugía (F.V.-R.), Hospital Angeles Lomas, Mexico, Mexico; Department of Surgery (M.S.), Macerata Hospital (ASUR Marche), Macerata, Italy; Trauma Surgery Department (W.B.), Scripps Memorial Hospital, La Jolla, California; General Surgery Department (L.A.), Bufalini Hospital, Cesena, Italy; and Trauma Service, Department of General Surgery (D.G.W.), Royal Perth Hospital, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.

The peripheral arteries and veins of the extremities are among the most commonly injured vessels in both civilian and military vascular trauma. Blunt causes are more frequent than penetrating except during military conflicts and in certain geographic areas. Physical examination and simple bedside investigations of pulse pressures are key in early identification of these injuries. In stable patients with equivocal physical examinations, computed tomography angiograms have become the mainstay of screening and diagnosis. Immediate open surgical repair remains the first-line therapy in most patients. However, advances in endovascular therapies and more widespread availability of this technology have resulted in an increase in the range of injuries and frequency of utilization of minimally invasive treatments for vascular injuries in stable patients. Prevention of and early detection and treatment of compartment syndrome remain essential in the recovery of patients with significant peripheral vascular injuries. The decision to perform amputation in patients with mangled extremities remains difficult with few clear indicators. The American Association for the Surgery of Trauma in conjunction with the World Society of Emergency Surgery seeks to summarize the literature to date and provide guidelines on the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of peripheral vascular injuries. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Review study, level IV.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000002967DOI Listing
December 2020

Status of trauma quality improvement programs in the Americas: a survey of trauma care providers.

J Surg Res 2017 12 2;220:213-222. Epub 2017 Aug 2.

University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.

Introduction: Global disparities in trauma care contribute to significant morbidity and mortality (M&M) in low- and middle-income countries. Implementation of quality improvement (QI) programs has been shown to be a cost-effective strategy to improve trauma care quality. In this study, we aim to characterize the trauma QI programs in a broad range of low- to high-income countries in the Americas to assess areas for targeted improvement in global trauma QI efforts.

Methods: We conducted a mixed methods survey of trauma care providers in North and South America distributed in-person at trauma care conferences and online via a secure survey platform. Responses were analyzed to observe differences across respondent country income categories.

Results: One hundred ninety-two surveys were collected, representing 21 different countries from three income strata (three lower-middle-, eleven upper-middle-, and eight high-income countries). Respondents were primarily physicians or physicians-in-training (85%). Eighty-nine percent of respondents worked at an institution where M&M conferences occurred. M&M conferences were significantly more frequent at higher income levels (P = 0.002), as was attending physician presence at M&M conferences (70% in high-income countries versus 43% in lower-middle-income countries). There were also significant differences in the structure, quality, and follow-up of M&M conferences in lower versus higher income countries. Sixty-three percent of respondents reported observing some kind of positive change at their institution due to M&M conferences. The survey also suggested significantly higher utilization of autopsy (P < 0.001) and electronic trauma registries (P = 0.01) at higher income levels.

Conclusions: This survey demonstrated an encouraging pattern of widespread adoption of trauma QI programs in several countries in North and South America. However, there continue to be significant disparities in the structure and function of trauma QI efforts in low- and middle-income countries in the Americas. There are several potential areas for development and improvement of trauma care systems, including standardization of case selection and follow-up for M&M conferences and increased use of medical literature to improve evidence-based care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2017.06.035DOI Listing
December 2017

Drugs, Violence, and Trauma in Mexico and the USA.

Med Princ Pract 2017 21;26(4):309-315. Epub 2017 Mar 21.

The impact of illicit drug markets on the occurrence of violence varies tremendously depending on many factors. Over the last years, Mexico and the USA have increased security border issues that included many aspects of drug-related trade and criminal activities. Mexico experienced only a small reduction in trauma deaths after the enforcement of severe crime reinforcement policies. This strategy in the war on drugs is shifting the drug market to other Central American countries. This phenomenon is called the ballooning effect, whereby the pressure to control illicit drug-related activities in one particular area forces a shift to other more vulnerable areas that leads to an increase in crime and violence. A human rights crisis characterized by suffering, injury, and death related to drug trafficking continues to expand, resulting in the exorbitant loss of lives and cost in productivity across the continent. The current climate of social violence in Central America and the illegal immigration to the USA may be partially related to this phenomenon of drug trafficking, gang violence, and crime. A health care initiative as an alternative to the current war approach may be one of the interventions needed to reduce this crisis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000471853DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5768117PMC
June 2018

[Case report. Post cesarean section laparoscopic cholecystectomy for hydrocholecystitis].

Ginecol Obstet Mex 2011 Apr;79(4):230-4

Departamento de Cirugía, Hospital Angeles Lomas, México, DF.

Background: Acute cholecystitis is the second most common surgical emergency in pregnant women. Although laparoscopic cholecystectomy has been described previously in these cases, there is still controversy regarding the most appropriate moment in which to perform the procedure.

Objective: To describe the clinical presentation and management of a female with 36.6 weeks of pregnancy and clinical signs of acute cholecystitis. Cesarean section to deliver a healthy newborn was immediately followed by laparoscopic cholecystectomy without complications. A 10 year literature review complements the analysis and discussion of the case.

Clinical Case: A 33 year-old female with 36.6 weeks of gestation presented a history of 24 hours with right upper quadrant and epigastric abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Symptoms were precipitated by cholecystokinetics and did not subside after expectant and pharmacologic medical treatment. The medical group decided with the patient's consent to interrupt the pregnancy via Cesarean section immediately followed by laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

Results: After Cesarean section through a Pfannenstiel incision, laparoscopic trocars were placed and cholecystectomy performed without complications. The postsurgical course was favorable and both patient and newborn were discharged on day four.

Conclusions: Laparoscopic surgery cholecystectomy during pregnancy and in the immediate puerperium is feasible and safe. These combined procedures: rapid pregnancy interruption followed by a minimal invasive approach gives the benefits of laparoscopic surgery in these patients.
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April 2011

[Pelvic solitary fibrous nodule, incidental finding and laparoscopic resection. Case report].

Ginecol Obstet Mex 2010 Sep;78(9):504-8

Hospital Angeles de las Lomas, Huixquilucan, Estado de México.

The solitary fibrous nodule is a rare clinical disease that mainly affects the pleura, but has been occasionally described in other anatomical sites. This type of tumors can have malignant components and therefore it is important to differentiate them from other retroperitoneal masses. We describe the case of a patient with ectopic pregnancy in whom a solitary fibrous nodule with laparoscopy was found. A peritoneal pelvic tumor with smooth surface, 20,2 g, firm was detected. The mass was independent of colon, uterus, ovaries or salpinx and was very near to the iliac vessels on the right side. A small fragment was biopsied and sent to trans surgical histopathology study and the rest of the mass was removed completely without complications. The histopathologic report described that the tumor contained sclerosed cells with collagenous bands and sings of hemorrhage and calcification, compatible with a benign pelvic solitary fibrous tumor. The solitary fibrous nodule is a rare, benign disease, but with malignant potential. These tumors must be resected when they are incidentally found during other surgical procedures or if diagnosed preoperatively. The laparoscopic approach has advantages in the identification and resection these tumors.
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September 2010

Evaluating trauma care capabilities in Mexico with the World Health Organization's Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care publication.

Rev Panam Salud Publica 2006 Feb;19(2):94-103

Secretaría de Salud, Sistema Estatal de Atención de Emergencias Médicas, Monterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico.

Objective: To identify affordable, sustainable methods to strengthen trauma care capabilities in Mexico, using the standards in the Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care, a publication that was developed by the World Health Organization and the International Society of Surgery to provide recommendations on elements of trauma care that should be in place in the various levels of health facilities in all countries.

Methods: The Guidelines publication was used as a basis for needs assessments conducted in 2003 and 2004 in three Mexican states. The states were selected to represent the range of geographic and economic conditions in the country: Oaxaca (south, lower economic status), Puebla (center, middle economic status), and Nuevo León (north, higher economic status). The sixteen facilities that were assessed included rural clinics, small hospitals, and large hospitals. Site visits incorporated direct inspection of physical resources as well as interviews with key administrative and clinical staff.

Results: Human and physical resources for trauma care were adequate in the hospitals, especially the larger ones. The survey did identify some deficiencies, such as shortages of stiff suction tips, pulse oximetry equipment, and some trauma-related medications. All of the clinics had difficulties with basic supplies for resuscitation, even though some received substantial numbers of trauma patients. In all levels of facilities there was room for improvement in administrative functions to assure quality trauma care, including trauma registries, trauma-related quality improvement programs, and uniform in-service training.

Conclusions: This study identified several low-cost ways to strengthen trauma care in Mexico. The study also highlighted the usefulness of the recommended norms in the Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care publication in providing a standardized template by which to assess trauma care capabilities in nations worldwide.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s1020-49892006000200004DOI Listing
February 2006