Publications by authors named "Federico L Ampil"

41 Publications

Long-term survival in patients with intermediate-risk head and neck cancer treated with adjuvant radiotherapy.

Oral Oncol 2021 03 1;114:105071. Epub 2020 Nov 1.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oraloncology.2020.105071DOI Listing
March 2021

Successful tri-modality treatment of atypical carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma with more than 50 nodal metastases.

Oral Oncol 2019 10 8;97:151-152. Epub 2019 Aug 8.

Department of Pathology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, 1501 Kings Highway, Shreveport, LA, USA.

Carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma (CEPA), an extremely aggressive malignant tumor, bears a significant potential for locoregional recurrence and distant metastases. Management of the disease usually involves definitive surgery with postoperative radiotherapy administered for identified nodal metastases. Two cases of CEPA with many (>50) cervical lymph node metastases and other histopathological features were managed by tri-modality treatment scheme. No evidence of disease occurred during follow-up of at least 2 years. These cases may eventually establish the value of surgery with adjuvant radiochemotherapy in patients with CEPA and supernumerary nodal metastases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oraloncology.2019.07.025DOI Listing
October 2019

Postoperative radiotherapy of intermediate-risk head and neck cancer in 134 patients: Does subset matter?

Clin Otolaryngol 2019 03 20;44(2):176-178. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

Department of Radiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, Louisiana.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/coa.13244DOI Listing
March 2019

Longevity after radiotherapy of stage III lung cancer: superior vena cava obstruction is associated with early mortality.

Ann Palliat Med 2018 Apr 24;7(2):242-248. Epub 2017 Nov 24.

Feist-Weiller Cancer Center, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA.

Background: People with locally advanced lung cancer have a poor prognosis. Physicians are unable to accurately predict life expectancy of patients. The aims of this retrospective study were to identify the life spans of individuals after radiotherapy of stage III carcinoma of the lung and to determine whether potential prognostic factors could identify people with distinct life spans.

Methods: Between September 1981 and August 2010, 133 consecutive individuals underwent definitive or palliative radiotherapy (with or without chemotherapy) for stage IIIA/IIIB disease. Analysis of the survival data revealed that 14 patients experienced long-term survival, exceeding 36 months; 94 patients had a short-term life span (STLS), extending between 4 and 36 months, and 25 patients were in the end-of-life (EOL) period, referring to the last 3 months of life. Recognized pre-treatment clinicopathological features were tested for their impact on prognosis.

Results: The largest proportion of patients presenting with superior vena cava obstruction (SVCO) (P<0.001) and receiving palliative radiotherapy (P=0.009) were from the EOL group. Most of the individuals with inadequate or no health insurance belonged to the STLS and EOL cohorts (P=0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of SVCO was an independent factor predictive of shortened survival/EOL status (P=0.001).

Conclusions: Our study showed that a particular disease characteristic, health insurance status and provision of contemporary therapy can influence individual longevity. Selection and prioritization of health care resources remain important; therefore, identification of influential prognostic factors in lung cancer patients deserves further scrutiny.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/apm.2017.10.02DOI Listing
April 2018

Sixty-day mortality after stereotactic radiosurgery of brain metastases-a forgotten palliative treatment outcome.

Ann Palliat Med 2017 08 9;6(Suppl 1):S113-S115. Epub 2017 May 9.

Pathology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center and Feist-Weiller Cancer Center, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/apm.2017.04.05DOI Listing
August 2017

Image-guided radiotherapy for cardiac sparing in patients with left-sided breast cancer.

Front Oncol 2014 23;4:257. Epub 2014 Sep 23.

Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Martinique Hospital , Martinique , France.

Patients with left-sided breast cancer are at risk of cardiac toxicity because of cardiac irradiation during radiotherapy with the conventional 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy technique. In addition, many patients may receive chemotherapy prior to radiation, which may damage the myocardium and may increase the potential for late cardiac complications. New radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may decrease the risk of cardiac toxicity because of the steep dose gradient limiting the volume of the heart irradiated to a high dose. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) is a new technique of IMRT delivery with daily imaging, which may further reduce excessive cardiac irradiation. Preliminary results of IGRT for cardiac sparing in patients with left-sided breast cancer are promising and need to be investigated in future prospective clinical studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fonc.2014.00257DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4172060PMC
October 2014

Can the lymph node ratio predict outcome in head and neck cancer with single metastasis positive-node?

Oral Oncol 2014 Apr 13;50(4):e18-20. Epub 2014 Feb 13.

Department of Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, University Health, USA; Feist-Weiller Cancer Center, Shreveport, LA 71130, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oraloncology.2014.01.012DOI Listing
April 2014

Defining 'upper mediastinal irradiation' in secondary subglottic laryngeal cancer.

Oral Oncol 2014 Apr 13;50(4):e15-6. Epub 2014 Jan 13.

Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oraloncology.2013.12.022DOI Listing
April 2014

Patient-provider delays in superior vena caval obstruction of lung cancer and outcomes.

Am J Hosp Palliat Care 2014 Jun 31;31(4):441-3. Epub 2013 May 31.

1Division of Therapeutic Radiology, Louisiana State University Health, Shreveport, LA, USA.

This retrospective study investigates the types of delay in the initiation of palliative thoracic radiotherapy for superior vena caval obstruction (SVCO) of lung cancer (LCa) and the effect of treatment delay on patient outcomes. Treatment delays were categorized as patient delay (duration of symptoms), in-hospital delay, and professional delay and were determined in 42 people treated by radiation for palliation of the complicated neoplastic condition between 1981 and 2009. The median period of patient delay was 26.2 days, in-hospital delay was 3.5 days, and professional delay was 1.5 days. The majority (80%) of these individuals were uninsured or underinsured, and 69% presented with locally advanced LCa. The overall response rate was 84%, and the 1-year survival rate was 24%. Despite the longest patient-related delay, symptomatic individuals overall derived palliation from conventional treatment. Improved efforts toward early diagnosis and treatment of patients with SVCO-LCa need to be continued.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1049909113491622DOI Listing
June 2014

Short survival after palliative radiotherapy for brain metastases in lung cancer: does the end justify the means?

Am J Hosp Palliat Care 2013 Jun 27;30(4):331-3. Epub 2012 Jun 27.

Department of Radiology, Louisiana State University Health and Feist-Weiller Cancer Center, Shreveport, LA, USA.

People with lung cancer (LCa) and symptomatic metastatic disease deserve palliative radiotherapy to promote a better quality of remaining life. On the other hand, in the case being described that of a LCa patient with brain and spinal metastases who died shortly after irradiation-- could management consisting of hospice and/or supportive care have been a better choice? Prognostic factors were analyzed in this retrospective study of the early deaths of 20 LCa patients with brain metastases in order to assist in a more rational decision making regarding treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1049909112450940DOI Listing
June 2013

Head and neck cancer with lower neck nodal metastases: management of 23 cases and review of the literature.

Oral Oncol 2012 Apr 9;48(4):325-8. Epub 2012 Mar 9.

Department of Radiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center and Feist-Weiller Cancer Center, Shreveport, LA 71130, USA.

To investigate the patient outcomes associated with the applied modes of therapy in head and neck cancer with lower neck nodal metastases. The medical records of 23 consecutive individuals who were managed by intent to treat for head and neck cancer with metastatic disease in the lower neck nodes over a 19-year period were reviewed. The mean age was 53.5 years, and the larynx was the most frequently affected primary site (57%). Overall, locoregional tumor control was achieved in the majority (75%) of the cases and the 2-year survival rate was 48%. The 2-year survival rates of people managed by surgery and postoperative radiotherapy, chemoradiation or single modality therapy were 63%, 56% and 17%, respectively, (p=0.04). Aggressive therapy resulted in five (22%) long-term (>5 years) survivors. The combination of treatment modalities proved to be effective management for head and neck cancer with lower neck nodal metastases and should be further investigated in prospective trials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oraloncology.2011.11.016DOI Listing
April 2012

How intensive should radiotherapy for head and neck cancer with synchronous distant metastases be? Review of cases.

J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2012 Mar 23;70(3):730-3. Epub 2011 Jul 23.

Division of Therapeutic Radiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA 71130, USA.

Purpose: Given the differences in treatment objectives among oncologists and complexities of standards of therapy for advanced head and neck cancer (HNC), we sought to determine whether HNC patients with simultaneous distant metastases (M1) benefit from aggressive therapeutic intervention.

Materials And Methods: Among the 1,988 patients diagnosed with HNC during a 22-year period, 7 patients with synchronous M1 tumors were identified. Of these individuals, 4 were treated with a prolonged course of radiotherapy for HNC (group A) and 3 were not (group B).

Results: The median survival and 60-day mortality rate in group A were 14 months and 0%, respectively, whereas the corresponding observations for group B were 5.5 months and 50%. No difference in HNC stage or M1 extent was present between the 2 groups. The patients composing group A were older than those in group B.

Conclusion: These data suggest that some benefit may be obtained by the application of a full course of irradiation for HNC with synchronous M1 disease. The practice of intensive radiotherapy for this particular complicated neoplastic condition needs to be reviewed, considering the health care reform and emphasis on cost-effectiveness in the near future.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joms.2011.03.037DOI Listing
March 2012

Palliative thoracic radiotherapy dose, non-small cell lung cancer with oligometastases and prognosis.

Ann Thorac Med 2011 Jul;6(3):154-6

Department of Radiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA E-mail:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/1817-1737.82455DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3131762PMC
July 2011

Does the negative node count affect disease-free survival in early-stage oral cavity cancer?

J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2009 Nov;67(11):2473-5

Division of Therapeutic Radiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA 71130, USA.

Purpose: We performed a retrospective study to determine whether there is a relationship between disease-free survival and negative lymph node count in patients with resected early-stage oral cavity cancers.

Materials And Methods: Of the 526 individuals diagnosed with carcinoma of the oral cavity between 1998 and 2005, 52 had undergone primary tumor resection and lymph node dissection of the neck for stage I or II disease. With a mean count of 27 examined negative nodes, these 52 patients were separated into groups with fewer than 27 or > or = 27 uninvolved lymph nodes and compared for disease-free survival.

Results: The tumor recurred or progressed in 10 patients (19%) during a median follow-up of 27 months. The 2-year disease-free survival rates were 75% and 78% in individuals with fewer than 27 and > or = 27 uninvolved node counts, respectively (P > .78).

Conclusion: The removal of a greater number of regional, uninvolved cervical lymph nodes does not correlate with disease-free survival in this particular cohort of patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joms.2009.04.126DOI Listing
November 2009

Paraplegia of spinal epidural compression by metastatic breast cancer and urgent radiotherapy-timeliness for naught?

J Neurooncol 2009 Oct 18;95(1):101-103. Epub 2009 Apr 18.

Department of Neurosurgery, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA, USA.

Four patients who became paraplegic because of spinal epidural compression by metastatic breast cancer were treated for palliation by external beam radiation. None of the four regained ambulation after therapy. Our findings place in question the urgent need for radiotherapy in these paralytic people with the disorder, especially when they are pain-free.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11060-009-9902-8DOI Listing
October 2009

Regional relapse from reseeding of the histologically negative neck by laryngeal cancer recurrence and salvage chemoradiation: a case report.

J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2008 Oct;66(10):2158-60

Division of Therapeutic Radiology, Louisiana State University, Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA 71130, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joms.2008.05.360DOI Listing
October 2008

Primary intracranial leiomyosarcoma: report of a case and review of the literature.

Sarcoma 2006 24;2006:52140. Epub 2006 Dec 24.

Department of Medicine, Feist Weiller Cancer Center, Louisiana State University Health Science Center - Shreveport, 1501 Kings Highway, Shreveport, LA 71130, USA.

A 26-year old man presented with a 3-month history of a progressively enlarging palpable parieto-occipital mass. A CT scan indicated the lesion arose from the dura with bony destruction. A stealth assisted craniotomy was performed with the provisional diagnosis of osteoblastic meningioma. Further histopathologic analysis of the intracranial mass was consistent with leiomyosarcoma. Staging evaluation, including CT and PET scans, demonstrated no other sites of disease. Despite complete surgical resection and radiotherapy to the resection site, the disease recurred locally and systematically 5 months later. Primary intracranial mesenchymal tumors are rare and few cases have been previously reported. Outcomes have been universally poor and current therapeutic approaches appear to have only limited benefit.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/SRCM/2006/52140DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1779506PMC
July 2011

Accelerated partial breast irradiation in early-stage breast cancer.

J Clin Oncol 2007 Mar;25(8):996-1002

Department of Surgery, Division of Radiation Oncology, LA State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA 71130, USA.

Whole-breast irradiation, as part of breast-conservation therapy (BCT), has well-established results, good cosmesis, and low toxicity. Results from the BCT trials suggest that the risk for ipsilateral breast cancer recurrence resides within close proximity to the original tumor site. This leads investigators to consider the role of an accelerated and more tumor bed-focused course of radiotherapy. Accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) involves treating a limited volume of breast tissue, with dose of irradiation per fraction increased and the treatment time course decreased. Four currently available methods of APBI are interstitial brachytherapy, intracavitary brachytherapy, intraoperative radiotherapy, and three-dimensional conformal external-beam radiotherapy. Patient selection is critical. This review article presents some preliminary clinical observations and limitations that suggest a potential role for APBI as a more user-friendly mode for delivering radiotherapy after lumpectomy for early breast cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2006.09.7436DOI Listing
March 2007

Total laryngectomy and T3-T4 laryngeal cancer without other adverse histopathology.

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2007 Feb;136(2):296-300

Department of Radiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center and Feist-Weiller Cancer Center, Shreveport, LA 71130, USA.

Objective: We sought to determine the postoperative management, incidence of tumor recurrence in the neck, and outcome in laryngeal cancer patients whose risk for tumor relapse is not clear.

Study Design And Setting: Thirty patients (27 of whom had transglottic tumors) met the study criteria (resected T3-T4 laryngeal cancer, histologically negative cervical nodes, and no other adverse histopathology). A group of 12 patients who underwent surgery alone was compared with a second group of 18 patients with similar characteristics but who received postoperative radiotherapy.

Results: Overall survival at five years was 50% in the surgery alone group and 61% in the combined therapy group (P=0.63). Among the 28 evaluable patients with a median follow-up of 44 months, the relapse rate in the neck was 25% in the surgery alone group and was 0% in the postoperatively irradiated group (P=0.07). Recurrences in the neck remained uncontrolled in two of the three patients at the time of death.

Conclusion And Significance: Postoperative radiotherapy deserves consideration in selected cases of T3-T4 laryngeal cancer without adverse histopathology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.otohns.2006.10.013DOI Listing
February 2007

Calvarial and scalp metastases: an unusual presentation of non-small-cell lung cancer.

J La State Med Soc 2006 May-Jun;158(3):133-4

Division of Therapeutic Radiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-Shreveport, USA.

We report the case of a 64-year-old woman who presented with scalp and skull masses. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of metastatic tumor from non-small-cell lung cancer. To our knowledge, this is the sixth case reported in the English literature. Although the occurrence of the distant neoplastic spread was a preterminal event, local electron beam irradiation effected significant resolution of the metastatic tumors.
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September 2006

De novo head and neck carcinoma in transplant recipients: preliminary results of management.

J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2006 Jul;64(7):1081-5

Department of Radiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA 71130, USA.

Purpose: To evaluate the stage-based definitive management approach of de novo head and neck cancer (HNC) developing in immunocompromised transplant recipients.

Patients And Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 5 patients with HNC who had previously received an organ or bone marrow transplant. Surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy (alone or in combination) were the employed therapeutic methods for stage I to IV HNC.

Results: At diagnosis of HNC, the average patient age was 60 years. The average interval between transplantation and the appearance of HNC was 5 years. In addition to immunosuppressive therapy, 4 patients had another risk factor for HNC development-long history of smoking; also, another person was treated by total body irradiation. With appropriate management that included local treatment for early-stage disease and bimodal therapy in cases of locally advanced neoplasms, all patients (4 being tumor-free) were alive at 6 to 38 months' follow-up.

Conclusion: Although longer follow-up information is needed, we contend that judicious stage-based management of HNC in transplant recipients is associated with outcomes not necessarily different from patients who are not immunosuppressed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joms.2006.03.014DOI Listing
July 2006

Head and neck cancer with simultaneous lung cancer.

J La State Med Soc 2004 Jul-Aug;156(4):193-5

Division of Therapeutic Radiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, USA.

The simultaneous occurrence of a primary malignant tumor of the lung or pulmonary metastasis in patients with head and neck cancer is uncommon. In response to the question, "Are efforts toward management of cancer in the head and neck region in a person with simultaneous malignant tumor of the lung an exercise in futility?" we present six cases evaluated at the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in Shreveport during a 19-year period. Men with squamous cell cancers at both locations and locally advanced malignant tumors of the lung were predominant in this series of patients. Chemoradiation was applied because of extensive disease at one or both neoplastic sites. Long-term survival was not observed in most patients (including the aggressively treated individuals) whose malignant neoplasms were concurrently managed by non-operative means.
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December 2004

Survival in relation to radiotherapeutic modality for brain metastasis: whole brain irradiation vs. gamma knife radiosurgery.

Am J Clin Oncol 2004 Aug;27(4):420-4

Department of Radiology/Radiation Oncology, LSU Health Sciences Center-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA 71130, USA.

The purpose of this report is to evaluate and compare the survival of patients with brain metastasis (BRM) treated by whole brain irradiation (WBI) using linear energy accelerator (LINAC) and by stereotactic radiosurgery using gamma knife. This study consists of a series of 67 patients with BRM treated with WBI between 1998 and 1999 and 53 patients with BRM treated with gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) between 2000 and 2001. A retrospective study of the data was performed and the overall survival between these 2 groups was analyzed. The comparability of these 2 groups was tested by chi2 and t test values. Log-rank test was used in the survival comparison. The 1-year survival rate was 26.3% and 22.6%, and corresponding mean survival was 7.8 months and 6.7 months for WBI and GKRS groups, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between these 2 groups' survival. It was evident from imaging defined lesions that with GKRS the lesions were reduced, stabilized, or disappeared in 89% of cases. Survival of patients with BRM treated with WBI or GKRS was similar in these series. The present study suggests that good tumor response by GKRS does not translate in longer patient survival.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.coc.0000128863.75360.a5DOI Listing
August 2004

Detection of recurrent cervical cancer by whole-body FDG PET scan in asymptomatic and symptomatic women.

Gynecol Oncol 2004 Jul;94(1):212-6

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA 71130-3932, USA.

Objective: To determine the ability of whole-body [(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scan to detect recurrent cervical carcinoma in both symptomatic and asymptomatic women.

Materials And Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 44 women previously treated for cervical cancer who underwent 47 posttreatment whole-body FDG PET scans in an attempt to detect recurrent disease. Twenty-six scans were performed in asymptomatic women, whereas 21 scans were performed in women with symptoms suggestive of recurrence.

Results: About 30.8% of asymptomatic women had recurrent disease detected by PET scan compared to 66.7% of women in the symptomatic group. The sensitivity of PET scan for recurrent disease in asymptomatic women was 80.0%, specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 100%, and a negative predictive value of 88.9%. For symptomatic women, the sensitivity of PET was 100%, specificity of 85.7%, a positive predictive value of 93.3%, and a negative predictive value of 100%.

Conclusions: The whole-body FDG PET scan is a sensitive imaging modality for the detection of recurrent cervical carcinoma in both symptomatic and asymptomatic women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2004.04.021DOI Listing
July 2004
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