Publications by authors named "Federica Trentin"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The Pipeline of Therapeutics Testing During the Emergency Phase of the COVID-19 Outbreak.

Front Med (Lausanne) 2020 24;7:552991. Epub 2020 Sep 24.

Department of Experimental Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.

The coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic poses a serious threat to the sustainability of healthcare systems and is currently having a significant effect on living conditions worldwide. No therapeutic agent has yet proven to be effective for the treatment of COVID-19. The management of this disease currently relies on supportive care and the off-label and compassionate use of antivirals and immunomodulators. Nevertheless, there has been a great worldwide effort to progress research and test the efficacy and safety/tolerability profiles of numerous candidate agents that may positively affect the various clinical syndromes associated with COVID-19. In parallel, vaccination and chemoprophylaxis strategies are being investigated. This article provides a summary of interventional studies targeting COVID-19 during the emergency phase of the outbreak to broadly inform clinicians and researchers on what happened and what they can expect in upcoming months. The clinicaltrials.gov database and the European Union (EU) Clinical Trials Register were investigated on March 31, 2020, to identify all ongoing phase 1-4 research protocols testing pharmacological interventions targeting SARS-CoV-2 infection and/or clinical syndromes associated with COVID-19. Overall, six phase 1, four phase 1-2, 14 phase 2, ten phase 2-3, 19 phase 3, and nine phase 4 studies were identified, and the features of these studies are described in the present review. We also provide an updated overview of the change overtime in the pipeline following this emergency phase and based on the current epidemiology of the COVID-19 pandemic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmed.2020.552991DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7542224PMC
September 2020

Breast cancer spinal metastases: Prognostic factors affecting survival after surgery. A retrospective study.

J Clin Neurosci 2020 Aug 26;78:73-78. Epub 2020 Jun 26.

Department of Oncological and Degenerative Spine Surgery, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy.

Breast cancer spinal metastases (BCSM) are common and require proper treatment that leads to an improvement of the quality of life and contributes to the quod vitam prognosis. Surgical treatment is often required for intractable pain, spinal cord compression or spinal instability. The aim of this retrospective study is to identify which prognostic factors could affect postoperative overall survival in patients affected by BCSM. We report a retrospective cohort study of patients with BCSM, surgically treated from September 2009 to May 2018. Demographic and clinical data were collected. Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate overall survival, and the log-rank test was used to compare survival curves. A total of 77 patients were studied. The median age at the time of surgery was 54 years. The median follow-up was 49 months. The 3-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 61% (95%CI: 47.5-72.1) and 43.3% (95%CI: 28.8-57.1). Metastatic bone disease (p = 0.0196), preoperative neurological impairment (p = 0.0029), Karnofsky status <70 (p = 0.0241) reduce survival. With multivariate analysis, the effect of Karnofsky score loses statistical significance. The presence of concurrent bone metastases and a preoperative neurological deficit are independent prognostic factors. Therapeutic choices are based on a multidisciplinary assessment that takes into consideration several factors, including an accurate study of prognostic factors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jocn.2020.06.010DOI Listing
August 2020

Role of frailty in the assessment of cognitive functioning.

Mech Ageing Dev 2019 07 3;181:42-46. Epub 2019 Jun 3.

Department of Human Neuroscience, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy.

Neuropsychological tests, besides reflecting the cognitive reserves and deficits of the tested individual, might also be differently affected by his/her underlying biological asset. In this context, the construct of frailty may offer an opportunity for better weighting the results of traditional tests. We evaluated the relationships between a set neuropsychological measures and a 35-item Frailty Index (FI). The role played by the FI in the relationship between neuropsychological tests and global cognition was also explored. Data from the first neurological and neuropsychological assessments of 79 subjects attending our university memory clinic because complaining cognitive disturbances were considered for the present analysis. A statistically significant correlation between FI and Trail Making Test-B was observed (Spearman's rho 0.33; p = 0.02). The relationship between the performance at the Rey Complex Figure and global cognition (as measured by the Mini Mental State Examination) was influenced by the FI. In fact, participants with higher FI levels had a weakened association linking constructional/visual memory abilities and general cognitive functioning. The interpretation of the neuropsychological assessment can be biased by the frailty status of the tested individual. It can be hypothesized the need of developing new models of correction, that may better reflect the person's biology and complexity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mad.2019.111122DOI Listing
July 2019
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