Publications by authors named "Fatemeh Atarzadeh"

10 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A review on the management of asthma in the Avicenna's Canon of Medicine.

J Complement Integr Med 2019 Sep 17;16(4). Epub 2019 Sep 17.

Department of Persian Medicine, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Introduction In this study, we attempted to identify medicinal plants for treating asthma by investigating Persian Medicine (PM) sources. Methods In the present review study, materials concerning asthma were assessed by the (most) reliable source of PM (Canon of Medicine) written by Avicenna. Recommended medicinal plants for treating asthma were extracted from this book. Likewise, the electronic databases were used for investigating the pharmacological properties of offered herbs. Results The signs and symptoms of "Rabv" discussed by Avicenna are very similar to the asthma in modern medicine. Avicenna dichotomized asthma causing into pulmonary and non-pulmonary ones, including asthma with the heart, liver, or stomach origin. Overall, 14 medicinal plants were mentioned for the treatment of asthma presented in Canon of Medicine, including celery, juniper, dodder, chamomile, fennel, quince seed, black caraway, lavender, hyssop, squill, anise, absinthe, asafoetida, and common polypody. Conclusions PM prescribes medicinal plants for treating asthma, based on each patient's symptoms and trigger factors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/jcim-2018-0148DOI Listing
September 2019

Topical application of L. fruit gel in management of cutaneous lesions of pemphigus vulgaris: A double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

Avicenna J Phytomed 2018 Nov-Dec;8(6):543-551

Shiraz Molecular Dermatology Research Center, Department of Dermatology, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Objective: L. fruit extract has been traditionally used in the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris (PV) lesions in Iran. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of fruit gel on healing time of PV lesions in a clinical setting.

Materials And Methods: This was a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial that was performed in dermatology ward at Saadi hospital, affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Right- or left- sided lesions of PV patients on standard systemic treatment were randomized for treatment with either fruit gel or placebo prescribed twice daily. The largest diameter of each lesion was measured at the baseline (day 0) and on days 10 and 20. Epithelialization Index (EI), as outcome measure was calculated and compared between the two groups.

Results: The present study comprised 20 patients, with overall 82 cutaneous lesions including 41 lesions in the fruit gel group and 41 lesions in the placebo group. The EI in the fruit gel group was significantly higher than that of the placebo group both on day 10 (65±28vs 30±34; p=0.001) and at the end of the study (91±22 vs 69±49; p=0.003).

Conclusion: Topical application of fruit gel can be considered as an effective adjuvant therapy in treatment of PV.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6235662PMC
November 2018

A review on botanicals with wound healing activity for pemphigus vulgaris perspective of traditional Persian medicine and conventional medicine.

Avicenna J Phytomed 2017 Nov-Dec;7(6):486-494

Department of Traditional Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Objective: As a rare autoimmune disease, pemphigus vulgaris has a poor prognosis especially in lack of proper medical support. This blistering disease involves both the skin and mucus membranes. The challenge is improving the healing process of skin lesions of which, superimposed infections are among the main causes of the disease mortality. Accordingly, we aimed to assess the treatment options suggested by traditional Persian medicine (TPM) and compare them with current findings.

Materials And Methods: We studied the main clinical and pharmaceutical textbooks of TPM (Kitāb al-hāwīfī al-tibb, the Canon of Medicine, Eksir-e-Aazam, Tuhfat al-mu'minīn, Makhzan al-adviyah (focusing on the skin chapter and respective herbal remedies for the inflamed skin and ulcers. Additionally, scientific databases such as PubMed, Science direct, Scopus, and Google Scholar were searched for the current pharmacological evidence. In the studied books, the term "hot ulcers" was found close to what is known as "Pemphigus vulgaris".

Results: Reported medicinal herbs possess anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, wound healing, and antibacterial activities reported by recent studies. Therefore, they could be introduced as novel natural remedies for pemphigoid wounds.

Conclusion: Taken as a whole, the review of traditional remedies for hot ulcers in Persian medical and pharmaceutical literature may open a new window toward developing new topical treatments for this disease.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5745532PMC
January 2018

: A remedy from Traditional Persian Medicine for treatment of cutaneous lesions of pemphigus vulgaris.

Avicenna J Phytomed 2017 Mar-Apr;7(2):107-115

Department of Traditional Persian Medicine, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Objective: Pemphigus is a rare autoimmune disease that may be fatal without proper medical intervention. It is a blistering disease that involves both the skin and mucus membranes, in which the most important causes of death comprise superimposed opportunistic infections and complications of long-term high-dose corticosteroid therapy or prolonged consumption of immune suppressant drugs. Skin lesions are the most important sources of infection, and any local treatment decreasing the healing time of lesions and reducing the total dosage of drugs is favorable.

Materials And Methods: Here, we review the probable mechanism of action of a traditional formulary of () fruit extract in almond oil as a new topical medication for reducing the duration of treatment of pemphigus vulgaris erosions.

Results: fruit oil has lupeol, anthraquinone compounds as rhein and flavonoids. Previous and animal studies on fruit have demonstrated wound healing, antioxidative, anti-leukotrienes, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and antifungal effects of this plant.

Conclusion: It is hypothesized that L. can be a botanical therapeutic choice for treatment of pemphigus erosions.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5355816PMC
March 2017

Relationship Between Temperaments of Herbal Diuretics and Their Effects Based on Avicenna's Teaching.

Iran J Pharm Res 2017 ;16(Suppl):227-228

Herbal medicine department, research institute for Islamic and complementary medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5963664PMC
January 2017

Early Description of Diet-Induced Blistering Skin Diseases in Medieval Persia: Avicenna's Point of View.

Skinmed 2016;14(5):367-370. Epub 2016 Oct 1.

Departments of Pharmacognosy, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Pemphigus is an autoimmune blistering skin disease that is strongly associated with different environmental factors. Among these, nutritional factors are considered to trigger pemphigus; however, their role may be underestimated. Investigated more recently in conventional medicine, this causative bond between dietary factors and blistering skin diseases was mentioned by Persian scholars such as Avicenna a thousand years ago. Avicenna, a well-known Persian physician and philosopher, who could be considered a pioneer in dermatology, discussed skin diseases in a chapter in . He accounted for some nutritional triggers for skin blisters (mentioned as "hot swellings"), such as onion, garlic, leek, pepper, and wine. His precise description of causative factors based on principles of traditional Persian medicine (TPM) is appreciable and might well lead us to find more efficient ways for the prevention and treatment of blistering skin diseases.
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September 2018

Blistering disease in viewpoint of Avicenna.

J Integr Med 2016 11;14(6):412-414

Department of Traditional Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 14162002000, Iran.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2095-4964(16)60277-7DOI Listing
November 2016

Avicenna-A Pioneer in Dermatology.

JAMA Dermatol 2016 11;152(11):1257

Department of Traditional Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamadermatol.2016.0026DOI Listing
November 2016

Preventive effect of Malva on urinary toxicity after radiation therapy in prostate cancer patients: A multi-centric, double-blind, randomized clinical trial.

Electron Physician 2015 Sep 16;7(5):1220-6. Epub 2015 Sep 16.

Assistant Professor, Shohada-e-Tajrish Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background: For patients receiving external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) after radical prostatectomy as adjuvant treatment or patients receiving EBRT as definitive treatment, partial irradiation of the urinary bladder is common. Many of such patients experience some degree of radiation-induced cystitis during or after EBRT. There is currently no efficient treatment for preventing radiation cystitis.

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of one of the safe mucilaginous herbs (Malva) in preventing radiation-induced dysuria in patients who are undergoing EBRT for prostate cancer.

Methods: From April 2013 to August 2014, 68 patients were randomized into two groups using four block randomization, 34 to the drug (Malva) group and 34 to the placebo group. Of the 68 patients who began the study, 60 completed it. They were instructed to use the medication, i.e., Malva or the placebo, three times a day for six weeks. They were followed by a physician every two weeks for eight weeks, and urinary function was assessed in each visit by asking questions based on the Visual Prostate Symptom Score (VPSS) and a dysuria severity score. The changes in the VPSS and dysuria severity score between baseline and each follow-up visit were compared between the two groups in the study using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and t-tests.

Results: The median age of the 68 patients was 66. Twenty-one of 27 patients in the control group (77.7%) suffered from dysuria, while dysuria was detected in 23 of 33 patients (69.6%) who received Malva (odds ratio=2.70 for dysuria). After two weeks, four weeks, and six weeks of treatment with Malva, dysuria due to EBRT was milder in the treatment group than in the control group, and the differences were statistically significant (p = 0.005, p = 0.004, p = 0.001, respectively).

Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, our study is the first study to assess the protective effect of a mucilaginous herb (Malva) against urinary toxicity induced by EBRT. The positive results of this study warrant further studies in this field.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.14661/1220DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4590556PMC
September 2015

Botanicals: an alternative remedy to radiotherapy-induced dysuria.

Complement Ther Med 2015 Feb 6;23(1):90-9. Epub 2015 Jan 6.

Department of Traditional Iranian Medicine and Pharmacy Research Center, Faculty of traditional Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

Everyday, many patients get radiotherapy for prostatic, rectal, uterine cervix and other pelvic organs cancer. Dysuria is common in pelvic, especially prostate radiotherapy, but there is not any established and confirmed treatment for this therapeutic side effect. Therefore, an alternative therapeutic method, using herbal preparation, may be an effective solution. This study seeks a defensible suggestion in Iranian Traditional Medicine (ITM). In ITM, a few medicinal herbs such as Plantago psyllium, Cydonia oblonga, Portulaca oleracea and some species of Malvaceae and Cucurbitaceae family are indicated in treating dysuria secondary to urethral moisturizing layer defect and inflammatory disorders. Most of these herbs have mucilaginous characteristics and tissue regeneration ability. This choice can be an appropriate one for radiotherapy-induced dysuria as it is produced by a similar pathophysiology with bladder cell layer injury and urethritis. Pharmacological properties such as anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-ulcerogenic activity of the offered herbs make its use justifiable. In lack of sufficient clinical trials to clarify the clinical outcome, further clinical investigation seems to be necessary.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ctim.2014.11.004DOI Listing
February 2015