Publications by authors named "Farzaneh Vakili"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Impact of Hypericum Perforatum Ointment on Perineal Pain Intensity Following Episiotomy: a Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial.

J Caring Sci 2018 Dec 1;7(4):205-211. Epub 2018 Dec 1.

Department of Histology, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of Hypericum Perforatum ointment on perineal pain intensity following episiotomy among primiparous women. This triple-blind clinical trial was performed on 98 eligible primiparous women referring to selected educational hospital of Tehran University of Medical Sciences for normal vaginal delivery. Block Randomization (in 1; 1 ratio) was used to categorize the participants continuously into two groups: intervention (using Hypericum Perforatum ointment) and control (using placebo ointment). Participants in each group used ointments (about 3 grams each time) on episiotomy site, twice a day and for a period of ten days. Our primary outcome was the pain intensity in different intervals following episiotomy. The data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 13) using student's t test, Mann-Whitney U test and chi-square test. We missed 14 participants during the study and analyzed the data from 42 participants in each group. The mean of pain scores revealed no significant differences before (mean difference=-0.33; P=0.46) and four hours (mean difference=0.57; P=0.13) after ointments use, between the intervention and control groups, while these differences were significant after eight hours (mean difference=2.17; P<0.001), five days (mean difference=2.20; P<0.001) and ten days (mean difference=2.21; P<0.001) following the intervention. Using Hypericum Perforatum ointment as a noninvasive, simple and effective topical formulation, can significantly reduce pain intensity of episiotomy site.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.15171/jcs.2018.031DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6311625PMC
December 2018

HIV-1 Drug Resistance Profiles for the HIV Protease and Reverse Transcriptase Gene in Patients Receiving Combination Therapy in Tehran, Iran.

Infect Disord Drug Targets 2018 ;18(3):241-248

Iranian Research Center for HIV/AIDS, Iranian Institute for Reduction of High-Risk Behaviors, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background: Determination of the drug-resistant mutations has a crucial role in the management of HIV-1 infected patients.

Objective: The aim of the current study was to evaluate drug resistance profile of Reverse transcriptase and Proteasegenes, and to find the correlation between drug resistance mutations and ART regimen to intensifyphysicians'options for the most effective therapy which could also influence the establishment of health-related policies at the national level in Iran.

Method: HIV-1 RNA of 34 samples was extracted from plasma and RT Nested- PCR was performed and the final products were sequenced. Stanford HIV drug resistance sequence database was used for interpretation of the data.

Results: In 14 patients out of 15, the following mutations were observed; Nucleoside RT Inhibitor (NRTI)-Resistance Mutations with the prevalence of 11 patients having this mutation at codon 184 (73%) and Non-Nucleoside RT Inhibitor (NNRTI)-Resistance Mutations with the prevalence of 8 patients having NNRTI mutations at codon 103(53%).In 17 patients, major Protease Inhibitor (PI) Resistance Mutations were found out in 2 (12%) of them while the minor PI was found in7 (41%) patients.

Conclusion: An antiretroviral treatment consisting of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor and protease inhibitor, impairs the emergence of a resistant strain and descends its prevalence among the community. Having a high rate mutation in participants of this study raises concerns about treatment failure in HIV infected people in Iran. Observing high mutations rates in participants of this study raises concerns about treatment failure in HIV infected people in Iran.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1871526518666180416110259DOI Listing
January 2019

The effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus as feed supplement on skin mucosal immune parameters, intestinal microbiota, stress resistance and growth performance of black swordtail (Xiphophorus helleri).

Fish Shellfish Immunol 2015 Feb 13;42(2):533-8. Epub 2014 Dec 13.

Department of Fisheries, Sari University of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, Iran.

The present study evaluates the effects of different levels of dietary Lactobacillus acidophilus as feed supplement on intestinal microbiota, skin mucus immune parameters and salinity stress resistance as well as growth performance of black swordtail (Xiphophorus helleri). One-thousand and eight hundred healthy black swordtail larvae (0.03 ± 0.001 g) were randomly distributed in 12 tanks (100 L) at a density of 150 fish per aquaria and fed different levels of dietary L. acidophilus (0, 1.5 × 10(8), 3 × 10(8) and 6 × 10(8) CFU g(-1)) for 10 weeks. At the end of trial, there were significant differences among antibacterial activity of skin mucus in probiotic fed fish and control group (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the skin mucus protein level and alkaline phosphatase activity in control group were significantly lower than those of L. acidophilus fed fish (P < 0.05). Microbiological assessments revealed that feeding with probiotic supplemented diet remarkably increased total autochthonous bacteria and autochthonous lactic acid bacteria levels (P < 0.05). The results showed that dietary administration of L. acidophilus significantly elevated black swordtail resistance against salinity stress (i.e survival %) (P < 0.05). Also, dietary administration of different levels of L. acidophilus improved weight gain, SGR, FCR compared to fish fed unsupplemented diet (P < 0.05). These results demonstrate beneficial effects of dietary L. acidophilus on mucosal immune parameters, intestinal microbiota, stress resistance and growth parameters of black swordtail and the appropriate inclusion is 6 × 10(8) CFU g(-1).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fsi.2014.12.003DOI Listing
February 2015