Publications by authors named "Farzane Behnezhad"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Late Complications of COVID-19; a Systematic Review of Current Evidence.

Arch Acad Emerg Med 2021 20;9(1):e14. Epub 2021 Jan 20.

Department of Global Health and Socioepidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto. Japan.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7927752PMC
January 2021

Reinfection risk of novel coronavirus (COVID-19): A systematic ‎review of current evidence.

World J Virol 2020 Dec;9(5):79-90

Université Aix-Marseille, Institutde Neuro-physiopathologie (INP), UMR 7051, Faculté de ‎Pharmacie, 27 Bd Jean Moulin, Marseille 546789235, France.

Background: There is recently a concern regarding the reinfection and reactivation of previously reCoVered coronavirus disease 2019 (CoVID-19) patients.

Aim: To summarize the recent findings and reports of CoVID-19 reinfection in patients previously reCoVered from the disease.

Methods: This study was a systematic review of current evidence conducted in August 2020. The authors studied the probable reinfection risk of novel coronavirus (CoVID-19). We performed a systematic search using the keywords in online databases. The investigation adheres to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) checklist to ensure the reliability and validity of this study and results.

Results: We reviewed 31 studies. Eight studies described reCoVered patients with reinfection. Only one study reported reinfected patients who died. In 26 studies, there was no information about the status of the patients. Several studies indicated that reinfection is not probable and that post-infection immunity is at least temporary and short.

Conclusion: Based on our review, we concluded that a positive polymerase chain reaction retest could be due to several reasons and should not always be considered as reinfection or reactivation of the disease. Most relevant studies in positive retest patients have shown relative and probably temporary immunity after the reCoVery of the disease.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5501/wjv.v9.i5.79DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7747024PMC
December 2020

A systematic review of ECG findings in patients with COVID-19.

Indian Heart J 2020 Nov-Dec;72(6):500-507. Epub 2020 Nov 13.

School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

Introduction: Since the epidemic of COVID-19 attracted the attention, reports were surrounding electrocardiographic changes in the infected individuals. We aimed at pinpointing different observed ECG findings and discussing their clinical significance.

Methods: We conducted a systematic search in PubMed, Embase, and Scopus databases. We included eligible original papers, reports, letters to the editors, and case reports published from December 2019 to May 10, 2020.

Results: The team identified 20 articles related to this topic. We divided them into articles discussing drug-induced and non-drug-induced changes. Studies reported an increased risk of QTc interval prolongations influenced by different therapies based on chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine, and azithromycin. Although these medications increased risks of severe QTc prolongations, they induced no arrhythmia-related deaths. In the non-drug-induced group, ST-T abnormalities, notably ST elevation, accounted for the most observed ECG finding in the patients with COVID-19, but their relation with myocardial injuries was under dispute.

Conclusion: This systematic review suggests that identifying ECG patterns that might be related to COVID-19 is vital. Provided that physicians do not recognize these patterns, they might erroneously risk the lives of their patients. Furthermore, important drug-induced ECG changes provide awareness to the health-care workers on the risks of possible therapies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ihj.2020.11.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7661958PMC
January 2021

Transmission Modes of COVID-19: A Systematic Review.

Infect Disord Drug Targets 2020 Nov 15. Epub 2020 Nov 15.

Iranian Research Center for HIV/AIDS, Iranian Institute for Reduction of High Risk Behaviors, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran. Iran.

Background: The Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) is a highly transmittable viral infection that initiated in Wuhan, China and has spread around the world. The high prevalence and spread ways of COVID-19 have become an international challenge that requires careful consideration. We aimed to review the current evidence of COVID-19 transmission modes.

Methods: This study was a systematic review that was done to identify current evidence on transmission modes of COVID19. We searched selected keywords in six important databases to discover related sources on the main objective of the study. To identify studies meeting the inclusion criteria, the authors screened the titles and abstracts of retrieved documents. The appropriate articles were selected and their results were discussed to make the final inclusion.

Results: We identified five potential transmission modes of COVID-19 including airborne, droplet, contact with contaminated surfaces, oral and fecal secretions. Furthermore, some studies have pointed out other modes of virus transmission, such as person to person, and direct contact with animals.

Conclusion: Droplet and contact with contaminated surfaces were the most frequent transmission modes of COVID-19. Fecal excretion, environmental contamination, and fluid pollution might contribute to a viral transmission. The possibility of fecal transmission of COVID-19 has implications, especially in areas with poor sanitation and the environmental pollution can be caused by patients with SARS-CoV-2 through respiratory droplets and feces, subsequently, the human environment will change to a potential medium of virus transmission.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1871526520666201116095934DOI Listing
November 2020

Olfactory and gustatory dysfunctions due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19): a review of current evidence.

Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2021 Feb 17;278(2):307-312. Epub 2020 Jun 17.

Iranian Research Center for HIV/AIDS, Iranian Institute for Reduction of High Risk Behaviors, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Introduction: It is reported that coronavirus disease (COVID-19) can affect the sense of smell and taste of infected people. The pathobiology of this virus is still incompletely known, and it is therefore important to explore the impact of COVID-19 infections on olfactory and gustatory functions. We aimed to review current evidence on olfactory and gustatory dysfunctions caused by COVID-19.

Methods: This study was a narrative review performed in 2020 to investigate the olfactory and gustatory dysfunctions of the COVID-19. We searched eight keywords in six databases to determine the related documents on the main objective of the study. To discover studies meeting the inclusion criteria, the authors screened the titles and abstracts of the identified articles. The appropriate studies were included and their results were discussed to make the final selection.

Results: We have studied 24 current articles on the olfactory and gustatory dysfunctions due to COVID-19. A review of current studies has shown that we have a surge in the spread of olfactory and gustatory dysfunctions that happened during the epidemic of COVID-19 infection. Most studies (95.8%) have confirmed the symptoms of anosmia in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. A review of current studies showed that, in addition to anosmia, evidence of ageusia and dysgeusia (parageusia) was also seen in patients with COVID-19.

Conclusion: The results of our study support recent reports that SARS-CoV-2 may infect oral and nasal tissues and cause olfactory and gustatory dysfunctions. These findings may aid future research on the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of COVID-19 consequences.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00405-020-06120-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7297932PMC
February 2021