Publications by authors named "Farrah Samraoui"

5 Publications

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The future for Mediterranean wetlands: 50 key issues and 50 important conservation research questions.

Reg Environ Change 2021 21;21(2):33. Epub 2021 Mar 21.

Mediterranean Small Islands Initiative (PIM), Lycée des Calanques, 89 Traverse Parangon, 13008 Marseille, France.

Wetlands are critically important for biodiversity and human wellbeing, but face a range of challenges. This is especially true in the Mediterranean region, where wetlands support endemic and threatened species and remain integral to human societies, but have been severely degraded in recent decades. Here, in order to raise awareness of future challenges and opportunities for Mediterranean wetlands, and to inform proactive research and management, we identified (a) 50 key issues that might affect Mediterranean wetlands between 2020 and 2050, and (b) 50 important research questions that, if answered, would have the greatest impact on the conservation of Mediterranean wetlands between 2020 and 2050. We gathered ideas through an online survey and review of recent literature. A diverse assessment panel prioritised ideas through an iterative, anonymised, Delphi-like process of scoring, voting and discussion. The prioritised issues included some that are already well known but likely to have a large impact on Mediterranean wetlands in the next 30 years (e.g. the accumulation of dams and reservoirs, plastic pollution and weak governance), and some that are currently overlooked in the context of Mediterranean wetlands (e.g. increasing desalination capacity and development of antimicrobial resistance). Questions largely focused on how best to carry out conservation interventions, or understanding the impacts of threats to inform conservation decision-making. This analysis will support research, policy and practice related to environmental conservation and sustainable development in the Mediterranean, and provides a model for similar analyses elsewhere in the world.

Supplementary Information: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s10113-020-01743-1.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10113-020-01743-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7982080PMC
March 2021

Trichoptera and Plecoptera of the Seybouse River, northeast Algeria: Distribution, phenology and new records.

Zootaxa 2020 Sep 4;4845(4):zootaxa.4845.4.5. Epub 2020 Sep 4.

Laboratoire de Conservation des Zones Humides, Université 8 mai 1945 Guelma, Guelma, Algeria Department of Biology, University Badji Mokhtar Annaba, Annaba, Algeria.

The stoneflies and caddisflies of North Africa are still poorly known as vast areas of Algeria have yet to be investigated. A survey of the macroinvertebrates of the Seybouse River, northeast Algeria, was carried out from July 2014 to December 2016. Three species of stoneflies (Capnopsis schilleri, Capnioneura petitpierreae, and Tyrrhenoleuctra tangerina) and five taxa of caddisflies (Mesophylax aspersus, Hydropsyche maroccana, H. resmineda, H. artax/lobata, and H. gr. pellucidula) were identified. All taxa are new records to the Seybouse River and seven of them are new to northeastern Algeria. A multivariate analysis indicated that the Hydropsychidae exhibited a clear longitudinal gradient along the Seybouse River while Mesophylax aspersus seemed adapted to species-poor, intermittent streams. Further investigations of the stoneflies and caddisflies may inform conservation efforts and will prove useful to monitor the Seybouse River and similarly threatened North African rivers and streams.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4845.4.5DOI Listing
September 2020

Contribution to the knowledge of the caddisfly fauna of Algeria: An updated checklist of Algerian Trichoptera with new records from the Aures region.

Zootaxa 2020 Jun 2;4786(2):zootaxa.4786.2.4. Epub 2020 Jun 2.

Laboratoire de Conservation des Zones Humides, Université 8 Mai 1945 Guelma, Guelma, Algeria Department of Ecology, Université 8 Mai 1945 Guelma, Guelma, Algeria.

The caddisfly fauna of Algeria is poorly known and the few sporadic studies available were carried out decades ago. In this study, caddisfly larvae, pupae, and adults were collected in 11 stream localities from the Aures region, northeastern Algeria. Caddisflies were regularly sampled between April 2018 and February 2020. Two genera are new records to Algeria: Plectrocnemia and Setodes. In addition, four Trichoptera species are new to the Algerian fauna: Tinodes dives, Hydropsyche modesta, Plectrocnemia conspersa and Setodes acutus. Future caddisfly surveys in the region will doubtlessly contribute significantly to the incompletely known Trichoptera fauna of Algeria.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4786.2.4DOI Listing
June 2020

Patterns of resource partitioning by nesting herons and ibis: how are odonata exploited?

C R Biol 2012 Apr 24;335(4):310-7. Epub 2012 Apr 24.

Laboratoire de recherche et de conservation des zones humides, University of Guelma, Guelma, Algeria.

Herons and ibis are colonially nesting waders which, owing to their number, mobility and trophic role as top predators, play a key role in aquatic ecosystems. They are also good biological models to investigate interspecific competition between sympatric species and predation; two processes which structure ecological communities. Odonata are also numerous, diverse, mobile and can play an important role in aquatic ecosystems by serving as prey for herons and ibis. A relationship between prey size and bird predator has been observed in Numidia wetlands (NE Algeria) after analyzing food boluses regurgitated by six species of birds (Purple Heron, Black-crowned Night Heron, Glossy Ibis, Little Egret, Squacco Heron and Cattle Egret) during the breeding period, which also shows a temporal gradient for the six species. Both the Levins index and preliminary multivariate analysis of the Odonata as prey fed to nestling herons and ibis, indicated a high degree of resource overlap. However, a distinction of prey based on taxonomy (suborder and family) and developmental stage (larvae or adults) reveals a clear size dichotomy with large-sized predators (Purple Heron, Black-crowned Night Heron and Glossy Ibis) preying on large preys like Aeshnids and Libellulids and small-sized predators feeding mainly on small prey like Zygoptera. Overall, the resource utilization suggests a pattern of resource segregation by coexisting nesting herons and ibis based on the timing of reproduction, prey types, prey size and foraging microhabitats.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.crvi.2012.03.009DOI Listing
April 2012
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