Publications by authors named "Fariba Kolahdooz"

86 Publications

Dietary Adequacy among Multi-Ethnic Urban Youth in Edmonton: Findings from the Wellness and Health in Youth - Aboriginal and All Communities in Transition NOW (WHY ACT NOW) Project.

J Am Coll Nutr 2020 Aug 17:1-10. Epub 2020 Aug 17.

Indigenous and Global Health Research Group, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.

Objective: The development of obesity and chronic diseases in adulthood often results from a childhood pattern of dietary excesses. This study aimed to identify dietary inadequacies and excesses of multiethnic youth in Edmonton.

Methods: A cross-sectional survey of a convenience sample of 473 multiethnic youth between 11 and 18 years was conducted in 12 schools in Edmonton between October 2013 and March 2014. Data were analyzed to determine for each participant mean daily energy and nutrient intakes, dietary adequacy, and nutrient densities. Participants were divided by self-identified ethnicity (Indigenous, European, African and Middle Eastern, and Asian).

Results: For all nutrients examined, the mean percentage of calories from fat was higher among European (31.7%) and Indigenous youth (31.8%) compared to African and Middle Eastern (28.3%) and Asian youth (29.0%), while Asian youth had the highest percentage of calories from protein (17.7%) compared to other ethnic groups (Indigenous = 15.5%; African & Middle Eastern = 16.5%; European = 16.2%). The majority of youth fell below the recommended values for dietary fiber (83.3-92.0%), vitamins D (84.4-90.2%), and E (89.5-92.0%). More than 50% fell below the dietary reference intakes (DRIs) for vitamin A, vitamin B5, calcium, and magnesium; >30% were below the DRI for folate, zinc, and vitamins B6, and C. The diet of girls contained a greater density of fiber compared to boys (9.3 vs. 8.0 g/1000 kcal; p-value = 0.002).

Conclusions: Inadequate dietary intake is evident among the majority of multiethnic youth in Edmonton. There is a need to develop strategies to reduce the burden of poor nutrition status for youth.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07315724.2020.1805042DOI Listing
August 2020

COVID-19 and pregnancy: a review of current knowledge.

Infez Med 2020 Jun;28(suppl 1):46-51

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, I.R. Iran.

Background: Since December 2019, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a major health problem that is spreading all over the world. Several viral infections such as SARS, MERS, and influenza have been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. The question arises whether pregnant women are at greater risk of complications related to COVID-19 compared to other people What complications should we expect in the fetuses whose mothers were infected?

Aims: This review aims to provide a summary of studies on symptoms of COVID-19 and the possible risks of COVID-19 among pregnant women, as well as complications in fetuses and neonates whose mothers were infected with COVID-19.

Methods: The included data were provided from Web of Science, Cochrane, PubMed, and Scopus which are extracted from the published studies in English until April 2nd, 2020 that contained data on the risk of COVID-19 in pregnancy.

Results: The early symptoms of patients with COVID-19 were fever, cough, dyspnea, myalgia, and fatigue; while production of sputum, headache, hemoptysis, and diarrhea were other symptoms which were less common. There is no evidence of vertical maternal-fetal transmission in pregnant women with COVID-19.

Conclusions: The clinical findings in pregnant women with COVID-19 are not significantly different compared to other patients, and pregnant women with COVID-19 are not at a higher risk of developing critical pneumonia compared to non-pregnant women. Although, there has been no sign of vertical infection in infants, but maternal infection can cause serious problems such as preterm labour and fetal distress.
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June 2020

Effect of green cardamom on lipoproteins, glycemic control and anthropometric parameters: A meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

Clin Nutr ESPEN 2020 06 8;37:24-33. Epub 2020 Apr 8.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran. Electronic address:

Introduction: The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to summarize all the existing randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evidence and to evaluate the effects of green cardamom on lipoproteins, glycemic control and anthropometric parameters in healthy and/or with disease types compared with the control.

Method: Two independent authors systematically searched online databases including EMBASE, Scopus, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science from inception until 30th July 2019. RCTs complying with the following criteria were included in this meta-analysis: human trials with either cross-over design or parallel design, trials with data on the effects of green cardamom on serum lipoproteins and glycemic control and anthropometric parameters with standard deviation and related 95% confidence interval for the both intervention and placebo groups. The heterogeneity among the included studies was assessed using Cochrane's Q test and I-square (I) statistic. Data were pooled using a random-effects model and weighted mean difference (WMD) was considered as the overall effect size.

Result: Seven trials were included in this meta-analysis. Triglycerides were significantly reduced after cardamom supplementation when compared with the control group. Cardamom intake from 3 small studies resulted in a significant increase in BMI when compared with the control group. However, cardamom supplementation did not have any significant effect on total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, fasting plasma glucose and body weight when compared with the control group.

Conclusion: This meta-analysis demonstrated that green cardamom intake significantly reduced triglycerides levels which may have played an indirect role in improved clinical symptoms in diseases with metabolic disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clnesp.2020.03.015DOI Listing
June 2020

Elevated Blood Pressure and Associations with Sodium Intake Among Multiethnic Youth in Edmonton, Canada: Findings from WHY ACT NOW.

High Blood Press Cardiovasc Prev 2020 Jun 7;27(3):239-249. Epub 2020 Apr 7.

Indigenous and Global Health Research Group, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Unit 5-10 University Terrace, 8303-112 Street, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2T4, Canada.

Introduction: This study examined the prevalence of pre-hypertension (PHT) and hypertension (HT) in urban youth, and assessed the effects of sodium intake and obesity on blood pressure (BP) by ethnicity.

Methods: A convenience sample of 557 multiethnic youth, aged 11-23 years, was recruited from 12 schools and institutions in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Participants were divided by self-identified ethnicity into four groups (Indigenous, African and Middle Eastern (AME), Asian, and European).

Results: Between October 2013 and March 2014, one-on-one interviews were conducted to collect data on demographics, physical activity, diet, and Body Mass Index (BMI). BP was obtained at two different times during the interview and measured a third time in cases of high variability. The standard deviation scores (SDS) of systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) were used to estimate associations with sodium intake (per 1000 mg/day). Overall, 18.2% and 5.4% of the participants had PHT and HT, respectively. Indigenous and AME participants showed the highest rates of PHT (23.1%). Indigenous and European participants showed higher rates of HT (8.3% and 5.3%, respectively) than other ethnic groups (AME = 4.4%, Asian = 3.9%). There was a positive association between 1000 mg/day increase in sodium intake and SDS of SBP by 0.041 (95% CI 0.007-0.083; p = 0.04) among pre-hypertensive participants. Over 85% of participants exceeded the recommended dietary sodium intake. Mean BMI and dietary sodium intake were higher among pre-hypertensive participants (4219 mg/day) than normotensive (3475 mg/day).

Conclusions: The prevalence of HT varied by ethnicity. High dietary sodium intake was of concern. There is a need for culturally-tailored, population-based interventions to reduce sodium intake.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40292-020-00377-yDOI Listing
June 2020

The effects of resveratrol on lipid profiles and liver enzymes in patients with metabolic syndrome and related disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Lipids Health Dis 2020 Feb 17;19(1):25. Epub 2020 Feb 17.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, IR, Iran.

Background: There are current trials investigating the effect of resveratrol supplementation on lipid profiles and liver enzymes among patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and related disorders; however, their findings are controversial. This systematic review and meta-analysis were aimed to determine the effects of resveratrol supplementation on lipid profiles and liver enzymes among patients with MetS and related disorders.

Methods: We performed a comprehensive search of the following online databases up to November 2018: Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. The relevant articles were assessed for quality of studies using the Cochrane risk of bias tool.

Results: Out of 2459 citations, 31 articles were appropriate for including to the current meta-analysis. The pooled results indicated that resveratrol use significantly decreased total cholesterol [weighted mean difference (WMD) = - 7.65 mg/dL; 95% CI, - 12.93, - 2.37; P < 0.01; I: 83.4%] and increased gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) concentrations (WMD = 1.76 U/l; 95% CI, 0.58, 2.94; P < 0.01; I: 20.1%). We found no significant effect of resveratrol supplementation on triglycerides (WMD = - 5.84 mg/dL; 95% CI, - 12.68, 1.00; P = 0.09; I: 66.8%), LDL- (WMD = -2.90 mg/dL; 95% CI, - 10.88, 5.09; P = 0.47; I: 96.0%), HDL-cholesterol (WMD = 0.49 mg/dL; 95% CI, - 0.80, 1.78; P = 0.45; I: 74.0%), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (WMD = -0.14 U/l; 95% CI, - 3.69, 3.41; P = 0.93; I: 79.6%), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (WMD = -0.34 U/l; 95% CI, - 2.94, 2.27; P = 0.80; I: 88.0%) concentrations.

Conclusions: This meta-analysis demonstrated that resveratrol supplementation among patients with MetS and related disorders significantly reduced total cholesterol and increased GGT concentrations, but did not affect triglycerides, LDL-, HDL-cholesterol, ALT, and AST concentrations. This data suggests that resveratrol may have a potential cardio-protective effect in patients with MetS and related disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12944-020-1198-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7026982PMC
February 2020

The effects of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) on mental health parameters and C-reactive protein: A meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

Complement Ther Med 2020 Jan 21;48:102250. Epub 2019 Nov 21.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran. Electronic address:

Background: The findings of trials investigating the effects of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) supplementation on depression, anxiety, and C-reactive protein (CRP) are inconsistent. The current meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was carried out to assess the effects of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) administration on mental health parameters and CRP levels.

Methods: Two independent authors systematically searched online databases including EMBASE, Scopus, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science from inception until 30 July 2019. Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool was applied to assess the methodological quality of included trials. The heterogeneity among the included studies was assessed using Cochrane's Q test and I-square (I) statistic. Data were pooled using a random-effects model and weighted mean difference (WMD) was considered as the overall effect size.

Results: Twenty one trials were included in this meta-analysis. Consumption of saffron resulted in a significant reduction in Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) (11 studies with 12 effect size) (WMD: -4.86; 95 % CI: -6.58, -3.14), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) (5 studies) (WMD: -5.29; 95 % CI: -8.27, -2.31) and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) scores (3 studies with 4 effect size) (WMD: -2.22; 95 % CI: -2.73, -1.72). Saffron intake did not affect Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-D), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS-A) scores and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels.

Conclusions: This meta-analysis demonstrated that saffron intake significantly reduced BDI, BAI and PSQI scores, but did not affect HDRS-D, HARS-A scores and CRP levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ctim.2019.102250DOI Listing
January 2020

The effects of alpha-lipoic acid supplementation on fasting glucose and lipid profiles among patients with stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

J Diabetes Metab Disord 2019 Dec 29;18(2):585-595. Epub 2019 Jul 29.

9Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, I.R. Iran.

Background And Objective: Stroke is a devastating condition with long-term comorbidities including metabolic abnormalities. Alpha lipoic acid (ALA), with its antioxidant properties, might improve metabolic status of patients, though current evidence is still inclusive. This systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was conducted to summarize the existing evidence regarding the effects of ALA supplementation on fasting glucose and lipid profiles among patients with stroke.

Methods: We searched Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and Web of Science from 1990 until April 5th, 2018. The relevant randomized-controlled articles, based on defined key words, were included in the analyses. Two independent researchers investigated study eligibility, extracted data, and assessed the risk of bias for included studies. Heterogeneity among included studies was tested using Q-test and I statistics. Random-effects models were applied to pool the data and standardized mean differences (WMD) were considered as summary effect size.

Results: A total of five studies (140 patients in each intervention group) were included in our meta-analysis. The findings showed that ALA supplementation significantly decreased fasting glucose levels (WMD -36.93 mg/dL; 95% CI, -65.58, -8.28;  = 0.01; I = 85.0%) in patients with stroke. We found no significant effect of ALA supplementation on triglycerides (WMD -7.45 mg/dL; 95% CI, -51.35, 36.45;  = 0.739; I = 83.9%), total cholesterol (WMD -23.23 mg/dL; 95% CI, -48.07, 1.62;  = 0.067; I = 80.5%), LDL-cholesterol (WMD -10.46 mg/dL; 95% CI, -21.01, 0.09;  = 0.052; I = 47.4%) and HDL-cholesterol levels (WMD -3.02 mg/dL; 95% CI, -20.18, 14.14;  = 0.730; I = 85.8%).

Conclusions: This meta-analysis suggested the beneficial impacts of ALA supplementation in improving fasting glucose of patients diagnosed with stroke.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40200-019-00423-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6915248PMC
December 2019

The effects of grape seed extract on glycemic control, serum lipoproteins, inflammation, and body weight: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Phytother Res 2020 Feb 26;34(2):239-253. Epub 2019 Dec 26.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran.

The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to analyze the effects of grape seed extract (GSE) on glycemic control and serum lipoproteins, inflammation and body weight. Two independent authors systematically searched online databases including EMBASE, Scopus, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science from inception until May 30, 2019. Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool was applied to assess the methodological quality of included trials. The heterogeneity among the included studies was assessed using Cochrane's Q test and I-square (I ) statistic. Data were pooled using a random-effects model and weighted mean difference (WMD) was considered as the overall effect size. Fifty trials were included in this meta-analysis. Pooling effect sizes from studies demonstrated a significant decrease in fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (WMD): -2.01; 95% confidence interval (CI): -3.14, -0.86), total cholesterol (TC; WMD: -6.03; 95% CI: -9.71, -2.35), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (WMD: -4.97; 95% CI: -8.37, -1.57), triglycerides (WMD: -6.55; 95% CI: -9.28, -3.83), and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations (WMD: -0.81; 95% CI: -1.25, -0.38) following GSE therapy. Grape seed did not influence HbA1c, HDL cholesterol levels, and anthropometric measurements. This meta-analysis demonstrated that GSE intake significantly reduced FPG, TC, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and CRP levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ptr.6518DOI Listing
February 2020

Opportunities for improving patient experiences among medical travellers from Canada's far north: a mixed-methods study.

BMJ Open 2019 12 4;9(12):e030885. Epub 2019 Dec 4.

Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Objectives: This paper explores patient experiences and identifies barriers and opportunities for improving access to healthcare for patients from the Canadian north who travel to receive medical care in a Southern province.

Design: A mixed-methods, cross-sectional study involved one-on-one interviews, focus group discussions and key informant interviews.

Participants: 52 one-on-one interviews with Northwest Territories (NWT) patients and patient escorts and two focus group discussions (n=10). Fourteen key informant interviews were conducted with health workers, programme managers and staff of community organisations providing services for out-of-province patients. A Community Advisory Board guided the development of the questionnaires and interpretation of results.

Results: Respondents were satisfied with the care received overall, but described unnecessary burdens and bureaucratic challenges throughout the travel process. Themes relating to access to healthcare included: plans and logistics for travel; level of communication between services; clarity around jurisdiction and responsibility for care; indirect costs of travel and direct costs of uninsured services; and having a patient escort or advocate available to assist with appointments and navigate the system. Three themes related to healthcare experiences included: cultural awareness, respect and caring, and medical translation. Respondents provided suggestions to improve access to care.

Conclusions: Patients from NWT need more information and support before and during travel. Ensuring that medical travellers and escorts are prepared before departing, that healthcare providers engage in culturally appropriate communication and connecting travellers to support services on arrival have the potential to improve medical travel experiences.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2019-030885DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6924833PMC
December 2019

Effects of resistant starch on glycemic control, serum lipoproteins and systemic inflammation in patients with metabolic syndrome and related disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials.

Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 2020 29;60(18):3172-3184. Epub 2019 Oct 29.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran.

The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of resistant starch (RS) on glycemic status, serum lipoproteins and inflammatory markers in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and related disorders. Two independent authors systematically searched online database including EMBASE, Scopus, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science from inception until 30 April 2019. Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool was applied to assess the methodological quality of included trials. The heterogeneity among the included studies was assessed using Cochrane's Q test and I-square (I) statistic. Data were pooled using a random-effects model and weighted mean difference (WMD) was considered as the overall effect size. Nineteen trials were included in this meta-analysis. Administration of RS resulted in significant reduction in fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (14 studies) (WMD: -4.28; 95% CI: -7.01, -1.55), insulin (12 studies) (WMD: -1.95; 95% CI: -3.22, -0.68), and HbA1C (8 studies) (WMD: -0.60; 95% CI: -0.95, -0.24). When pooling data from 13 studies, a significant reduction in total cholesterol levels (WMD: -8.19; 95% CI: -15.38, -1.00) and LDL-cholesterol (WMD: -8.57; 95% CI: -13.48, -3.66) were found as well. Finally, RS administration was associated with a significant decrease in tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) (WMD: -2.02; 95% CI: -3.14, -0.90). This meta-analysis showed beneficial effects of RS on improving FPG, insulin, HbA1c, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and TNF-α levels in patients with MetS and related disorders, but it did not affect HOMA-IR, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, CRP and IL-6 levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10408398.2019.1680950DOI Listing
November 2020

The effects of L-carnitine supplementation on glycemic control: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

EXCLI J 2019 19;18:631-643. Epub 2019 Aug 19.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran.

The findings of trials investigating the effect of L-carnitine administration on glycemic control are controversial. This meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed to explore the effects of L-carnitine intake on glycemic control. Two authors independently searched electronic databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, PubMed and Google scholar from 1990 until February 2019, in order to find relevant RCTs. 37 studies with 44 effect sizes met the inclusion criteria and were eligible for the meta-analysis. L-carnitine supplementation resulted in a significant reduction in fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (WMD: -4.57; 95 % CI: -6.88, -2.25), insulin (WMD: -1.21; 95 % CI: -1.85, -0.57), homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (WMD: -0.67; 95 % CI: -0.90, -0.44) and HbA1C concentrations (WMD: -0.30; 95 % CI: -0.47, -0.13). L-Carnitine supplementation significantly reduced FPG, insulin, HOMA-IR, and HbA1c levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.17179/excli2019-1447DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6785772PMC
August 2019

The Effects of L-Carnitine Supplementation on Serum Lipids: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

Curr Pharm Des 2019 ;25(30):3266-3281

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran.

Background: The findings of trials investigating the effects of L-carnitine administration on serum lipids are inconsistent. This meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed to summarize the effects of L-carnitine intake on serum lipids in patients and healthy individuals.

Methods: Two authors independently searched electronic databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, PubMed and Google Scholar from 1990 until August 1, 2019, in order to find relevant RCTs. The quality of selected RCTs was evaluated using the Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool. Cochrane's Q test and I-square (I2) statistic were used to determine the heterogeneity across included trials. Weight mean difference (SMD) and 95% CI between the two intervention groups were used to determine pooled effect sizes. Subgroup analyses were performed to evaluate the source of heterogeneity based on suspected variables such as, participant's health conditions, age, dosage of L-carnitine, duration of study, sample size, and study location between primary RCTs.

Results: Out of 3460 potential papers selected based on keywords search, 67 studies met the inclusion criteria and were eligible for the meta-analysis. The pooled results indicated that L-carnitine administration led to a significant decrease in triglycerides (WMD: -10.35; 95% CI: -16.43, -4.27), total cholesterol (WMD: -9.47; 95% CI: - 13.23, -5.70) and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations (WMD: -6.25; 95% CI: -9.30, -3.21), and a significant increase in HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels (WMD: 1.39; 95% CI: 0.21, 2.57). L-carnitine supplementation did not influence VLDL-cholesterol concentrations. When we stratified studies for the predefined factors such as dosage, and age, no significant effects of the intervention on triglycerides, LDL-C, and HDL-C levels were found.

Conclusion: This meta-analysis demonstrated that L-carnitine administration significantly reduced triglycerides, total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels, and significantly increased HDL-cholesterol levels in the pooled analyses, but did not affect VLDL-cholesterol levels; however, these findings were not confirmed in our subgroup analyses by participant's health conditions, age, dosage of L-carnitine, duration of study, sample size, and study location.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1381612825666190830154336DOI Listing
June 2020

The effects of curcumin supplementation on endothelial function: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Phytother Res 2019 Nov 18;33(11):2989-2995. Epub 2019 Aug 18.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran.

Impaired endothelial function is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Curcumin supplementation might be an appropriate approach to decrease the complications of CVD. Randomized controlled trials assessing the effects of curcumin supplementation on endothelial function were included. Two independent authors systematically searched online database including EMBASE, Scopus, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science with no time restriction. Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool was applied to assess the methodological quality of included trials. Between-study heterogeneities were estimated using the Cochran's Q test and I-square (I ) statistic. Data were pooled using a random-effects model, and weighted mean differences (WMDs) were considered as the overall effect sizes. Ten studies with 11 effect sizes were included. We found a significant increase in flow-mediated dilation (FMD) following curcumin supplementation (WMD: 1.49; 95% CI [0.16, 2.82]). There was no effect of curcumin supplement on pulse wave velocity (PWV; WMD: -41.59; 95% CI [-86.59, 3.42]), augmentation index (Aix; WMD: 0.71; 95% CI [-1.37, 2.79]), endothelin-1 (ET-1; WMD: -0.30; 95% CI [-0.96, 0.37]), and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1; WMD: -10.11; 95% CI [-33.67, 13.46]). This meta-analysis demonstrated the beneficial effects of curcumin supplementation on improving FMD, though it did not influence PWV, Aix, Et-1, and sICAM-1.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ptr.6477DOI Listing
November 2019

The effects of catechin on endothelial function: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 2020 7;60(14):2369-2378. Epub 2019 Aug 7.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran.

The findings of trials investigating the effect of catechin on endothelial function are controversial. This meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed to summarize the existing evidence and determine the effects of catechin supplementation on endothelial function. Two authors independently searched electronic databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science from inception until March 2019, in order to find relevant RCTs. The quality of selected RCTs was evaluated using the Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool. Cochrane's Q test and -square () statistic were used to determine the heterogeneity of included trials. Data were pooled using a random-effects model and weighted mean difference (WMD) was considered as the overall effect size. A total of 16 studies with 22 effect sizes were included in this meta-analysis. A significant increase in flow mediated dilation (FMD) in 10 studies was found after catechin supplementation including 13 effect sizes (WMD: 1.53; 95% CI: 0.93, 2.14). The pooled analysis of 7 effect sizes from 4 studies showed a significant reduction in pulse wave velocity (PWV) after catechin supplementation (WMD: -0.32; 95% CI: -0.44, -0.20) and combining 5 effect sizes from 3 studies in augmentation index (AI) (WMD: -3.57; 95% CI: -6.40, -0.74). Catechin supplementation significantly increased FMD, and significantly reduced PWV and AI, but did not affect other markers of endothelial function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10408398.2019.1639037DOI Listing
September 2020

The effects of spirulina on glycemic control and serum lipoproteins in patients with metabolic syndrome and related disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Phytother Res 2019 Oct 29;33(10):2609-2621. Epub 2019 Jul 29.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, I.R. Iran.

The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of spirulina on glycemic control and serum lipoproteins in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and related disorders. Two independent authors systematically searched online database including EMBASE, Scopus, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science from inception until April 30, 2019. The Cochrane Collaboration's risk of bias tool was applied to assess the methodological quality of included trials. The heterogeneity among the included studies was assessed using Cochrane's Q test and I-square (I ) statistic. Pooling effect sizes from studies showed a significant reduction in fasting plasma glucose (FPG; weighted mean difference [WMD]: -10.31; 95% confidence interval, CI [-16.21, -4.42]) and insulin concentrations (WMD: -0.53; 95% CI [-0.62, -0.44]) following the administration of spirulina. Pooled analysis showed also a significant reduction in total cholesterol (WMD: -20.50; 95% CI [-38.25, -2.74]), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C; WMD: -19.02; 95% CI [-36.27, -1.78]), and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C) concentrations (WMD: -6.72; 95% CI [-9.19, -4.26]) and a significant increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels (WMD: 1.42; 95% CI [0.16, 2.68]) following spirulina therapy. This meta-analysis demonstrated the beneficial effects of spirulina supplementation on improving FPG, insulin, total cholesterol, LDL-C, VLDL-C, and HDL-C levels in patients with MetS and related disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ptr.6441DOI Listing
October 2019

The effects of vitamin D treatment on glycemic control, serum lipid profiles, and C-reactive protein in patients with chronic kidney disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Int Urol Nephrol 2019 Sep 23;51(9):1567-1580. Epub 2019 Jul 23.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran.

Purpose: Insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and increased systemic inflammation are important risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hence, vitamin D administration might be an appropriate approach to decrease the complications of CKD. Randomized controlled trials assessing the effects of vitamin D supplementation or treatment on glycemic control, lipid profiles, and C-reactive protein (CRP) among patients with CKD were included.

Methods: Two independent authors systematically searched online databases including EMBASE, Scopus, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science in November 2018 with no time restriction. Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool was applied to assess the methodological quality of included trials. Between-study heterogeneity was estimated using the Cochran's Q test and I-square (I) statistic. Data were pooled using a random-effects model and weighted mean difference (WMD) was considered as the overall effect size.

Results: Of the 1358 citations identified from searches, 17 full-text articles were reviewed. Pooling findings from five studies revealed a significant reduction in fasting glucose (WMD: - 18.87; 95% CI: - 23.16, - 14.58) and in homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) through three studies (WMD: - 2.30; 95% CI: - 2.88, - 1.72) following the administration of vitamin D. In addition, pooled analysis revealed a significant reduction in triglycerides (WMD: - 32.52; 95% CI: - 57.57, - 7.47) through six studies and in cholesterol concentrations (WMD: - 7.93; 95% CI: - 13.03, - 2.83) through five studies, following vitamin D supplementation or treatment, while there was no effect on insulin, HbA1c, LDL and HDL cholesterol, and CRP levels.

Conclusions: This meta-analysis demonstrated the beneficial effects of vitamin D supplementation or treatment on improving fasting glucose, HOMA-IR, triglycerides and cholesterol levels among patients with CKD, though it did not influence insulin, HbA1c, LDL and HDL cholesterol, and CRP levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11255-019-02236-9DOI Listing
September 2019

The Effects of Resveratrol Supplementation on Endothelial Function and Blood Pressures Among Patients with Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

High Blood Press Cardiovasc Prev 2019 Aug 1;26(4):305-319. Epub 2019 Jul 1.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran.

Introduction: There are current trials investigating the effect of resveratrol supplementation on endothelial function and blood pressures among patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS); however, the findings are controversial.

Aim: This systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were carried out to summarize the effects of resveratrol supplementation on endothelial activation and blood pressures among patients with MetS and related disorders.

Methods: We searched systematically online databases including: PubMed-Medline, Embase, ISI Web of Science and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials until October, 2018. Two independent authors extracted data and assessed the quality of included articles. Data were pooled using the fixed- or random-effects model and considered as standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI).

Results: Out of 831 electronic citations, 28 RCTs (with 33 findings reported) were included in the meta-analyses. The findings showed that resveratrol intervention significantly increased flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) levels (SMD 1.77; 95% CI 0.25, 3.29; P = 0.02; I: 96.5). However, resveratrol supplements did not affect systolic blood pressure (SBP) (SMD - 0.27; 95% CI - 0.57, 0.03; P = 0.07; I: 88.9) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (SMD - 0.21; 95% CI - 0.52, 0.11; P = 0.19; I: 89.8).

Conclusions: Resveratrol supplementation significantly increased FMD among patients with MetS and related disorders, but did not affect SBP and DBP. Additional prospective studies are needed to investigate the effect of resveratrol supplementation on endothelial function and blood pressures, using higher-dose of resveratrol with longer durations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40292-019-00324-6DOI Listing
August 2019

The effects of mobile health interventions on lipid profiles among patients with metabolic syndrome and related disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Diabetes Metab Syndr 2019 May - Jun;13(3):1949-1955. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, I.R, Iran. Electronic address:

Objective: The current systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was conducted to summarize the effect of mobile health (m-health) interventions on lipid profiles among patients with metabolic syndrome and related disorders.

Methods: Cochrane Library, EMBASE, PubMed, and Web of Science databases were searched to indentify the relevant randomized clinical trials published up April 30, 2018. Two reviewers examined study eligibility, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias of included clinical trials, individually. Heterogeneity was measured using I-square (I) statistic and Cochran's Q test. Data were pooled the standardized mean difference (SMD) effect size by the random-effect model.

Results: 18 trials of 1681 citations were identified to be appropriate for the current meta-analysis. Findings random-effects model indicated that m-health interventions significantly decreased total- (SMD -0.54; 95% CI, -1.05, -0.03) and LDL-cholesterol levels (SMD -0.66; 95% CI, -1.18, -0.15). M-health interventions had no significant effect on triglycerides (SMD -0.14; 95% CI, -0.56, 0.28) and HDL-cholesterol levels (SMD -0.35; 95% CI, -0.81, 0.11).

Conclusion: Overall, the current meta-analysis demonstrated that m-health interventions resulted in an improvement in total- and LDL-cholesterol, but did not affect triglycerides and HDL-cholesterol levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dsx.2019.04.011DOI Listing
December 2019

The Effects of Probiotic Supplementation on Clinical Symptom, Weight Loss, Glycemic Control, Lipid and Hormonal Profiles, Biomarkers of Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

Probiotics Antimicrob Proteins 2019 Jun 4. Epub 2019 Jun 4.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran.

The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) is to determine the effectiveness of probiotic supplementation on clinical symptoms, weight loss, glycemic control, lipid and hormonal profiles, and biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Eligible studies were systematically searched from Cochrane Library, Embase, Medline, and Web of Science databases until January 2019. Cochran (Q) and I-square statistics were used to measure heterogeneity among included studies. Data were pooled by using random-effect model and expressed as standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Eleven articles were included in this meta-analysis. Probiotic supplementation significantly decreased weight (SMD - 0.30; 95% CI, - 0.53, - 0.07; P = 0.01), body mass index (BMI) (SMD - 0.29; 95% CI, - 0.54, - 0.03; P = 0.02), fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (SMD - 0.26; 95% CI, - 0.45, - 0.07; P < 0.001), insulin (SMD - 0.52; 95% CI, - 0.81, - 0.24; P < 0.001), homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (SMD - 0.53; 95% CI, - 0.79, - 0.26; P < 0.001), triglycerides (SMD - 0.69; 95% CI, - 0.99, - 0.39; P < 0.001), VLDL-cholesterol (SMD - 0.69; 95% CI, - 0.99, - 0.39; P < 0.001), C-reactive protein (CRP) (SMD - 1.26; 95% CI, - 2.14, - 0.37; P < 0.001), malondialdehyde (MDA) (SMD - 0.90; 95% CI, - 1.16, - 0.63; P < 0.001), hirsutism (SMD - 0.58; 95% CI, - 1.01, - 0.16; P < 0.001), and total testosterone levels (SMD - 0.58; 95% CI, - 0.82, - 0.34; P < 0.001), and also increased the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) (SMD 0.41; 95% CI, 0.11, 0.70; P < 0.01), nitric oxide (NO) (SMD 0.33; 95% CI 0.08, 0.59; P = 0.01), total antioxidant capacity (TAC) (SMD 0.64; 95% CI, 0.38, 0.90; P < 0.001), glutathione (GSH) (SMD 0.26; 95% CI, 0.01, 0.52; P = 0.04), and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels (SMD 0.46; 95% CI, 0.08, 0.85; P = 0.01). Probiotic supplementation may result in an improvement in weight, BMI, FPG, insulin, HOMA-IR, triglycerides, VLDL-cholesterol, CRP, MDA, hirsutism, total testosterone, QUICKI, NO, TAC, GSH, and SHBG but did not affect dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels, and total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol levels in patients with PCOS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12602-019-09559-0DOI Listing
June 2019

The effects of vitamin D supplementation on mental health, and biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in patients with psychiatric disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 2019 08 13;94:109651. Epub 2019 May 13.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran. Electronic address:

Background: In the current meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), the effects of vitamin D supplementation on mental health, and biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in patients with psychiatric disorders are assessed.

Methods: The following databases were search up to March 2019: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. The quality of the relevant extracted data was assessed according to the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Data were pooled by the use of the inverse variance method and expressed as mean difference with 95% Confidence Intervals (95% CI).

Results: Eleven effect sizes from nine studies were included in the final analyses. A pooled analysis of 9 effect sizes showed a significant reduction in Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score following supplementation with vitamin D [weighted mean difference (WMD): -3.91; 95% CI: -5.15 -2.66), I= 85.9%]. Combining data from two available studies on the effects of vitamin D supplementation on Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) also revealed a significant reduction in this score following the intervention (WMD: -1.78; 95% CI: -2.28, -1.28). In addition, there were significant increase in glutathione (GSH) through 3 studies (WMD: 180.70; 95% CI: 6.76, 354.64), and in total antioxidant capacity (TAC) through 3 studies (WMD: 90.09; 95% CI: 56.36, 123.82) after vitamin D supplementation. Combining data from five studies, we found a significant reduction in C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations after vitamin D supplementation (WMD: -1.74; 95% CI: -2.82, -0.66).

Conclusions: Overall, the current meta-analysis demonstrated that taking vitamin D supplements among patients with psychiatric disorders had beneficial effects on BDI, PSQI, GSH, TAC and CRP levels, but did not affect other biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pnpbp.2019.109651DOI Listing
August 2019

The Effects of Quercetin Supplementation on Blood Pressures and Endothelial Function Among Patients with Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

Curr Pharm Des 2019 ;25(12):1372-1384

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran.

Background: This systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were performed to determine the effect of quercetin administration on blood pressures and endothelial function among patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and related disorders.

Methods: We searched systematically online databases including Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and Web of Science to identify the relevant RCTs until December 2018. Q-test and I2 statistics were applied to assess heterogeneity among the included studies. Data were pooled using a random-effects model and weighted mean difference (WMD) was considered as the overall effect size.

Results: Out of 284 citations, 8 RCTs were included in the meta-analysis. We found a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure (SBP) (WMD: -1.69; 95% CI: -3.22, -0.17) following the intake of quercetin supplements. However, quercetin supplementation did not significantly affect diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (WMD: -3.14; 95% CI: -8.24, 1.95), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) (WMD: -24.49; 95% CI: -53.74, 4.77) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) (WMD: -5.78; 95% CI: -12.93, 1.38).

Conclusion: In summary, the current meta-analysis demonstrated that quercetin supplementation significantly reduced SBP, yet did not affect DBP, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 among patients with MetS and related disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1381612825666190513095352DOI Listing
February 2020

The effects of probiotic and synbiotic supplementation on inflammatory markers among patients with diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Eur J Pharmacol 2019 Jun 6;852:254-264. Epub 2019 Apr 6.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, I.R, Iran. Electronic address:

This systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed to evaluate the effect of probiotic and symbiotic supplementation on inflammatory markers among patients with diabetes. Clinical trials were searched using Cochrane Library, EMBASE, PubMed, and Web of Science online databases for relevant trials published until April 2018. Two independent investigators evaluated study eligibility, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias of included clinical trials. Cochran's Q test and I-square (I) statistic were used to detect heterogeneity among the included. Data were pooled by using the random-effect model and standardized mean difference (SMD) was considered as the summary effect size. From 986 originally identified publications 18 clinical trials with a total of 1337 patients were included. Findings showed that probiotic and synbiotic supplementation among patients with diabetes significantly decreased tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) (SMD = -2.99; 95% CI, -4.77, -1.20; P = 0.001; I: 96.3), and C-reactive protein (CRP) (SMD = -0.87; 95% CI, -1.27, -0.48; P < 0.001; I: 90.2); while significantly increased nitric oxide (NO) concentrations (SMD = 1.49; 95% CI, 0.81, 2.16; P < 0.001; I: 92.1). There were no effects of probiotic and synbiotic supplementation on interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels (SMD = -0.65; 95% CI, -1.88, 0.59; P = 0.30; I: 94.7). In summary, the current meta-analysis demonstrated probiotic and synbiotic supplementation among patients with diabetes significantly decreased CRP and TNF-α, and increased NO levels, but did not affect IL-6 levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejphar.2019.04.003DOI Listing
June 2019

Dietary Factors and Risk of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: a Systemic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Tanaffos 2019 Apr;18(4):294-309

Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

Background: The relationship between dietary pattern and the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been described; however, the exclusive role of dietary factors remains controversial. Hence, we conducted this systematic meta-analysis to clarify the role of some nutrients and antioxidant vitamins in the risk of COPD.

Materials And Methods: PubMed, Embase, and Scopus databases were searched for studies evaluating the associations between COPD outcome measures, symptoms, and mortality, and intake of fruits and vegetables, fiber, fish, n-3 or n-6 fatty acids, and antioxidant vitamins in adults. The random-effect model meta-analyses were used to pool the results.

Results: Ten cohort, six case-control, and 20 cross-sectional studies were identified. The pooled relative risks (RRs) of the COPD and confidence intervals (CIs) for the highest intake group compared with the lowest intake group were 0.74 (95% CI: 0.65-0.85) for fruit, 0.65 (95% CI: 0.55-0.78) for dietary fiber, 0.71 (95% CI: 0.58-0.85) for fish, and 0.89 (95% CI: 0.76-0.99) for vitamin C. No association was observed between the risk of COPD and the intake of vegetables, n-3 fatty acids, vitamin E, and β-carotene; however, it was associated with n-6 fatty acids 1.06 (95% CI: 0.87-1.30).

Conclusion: The results suggested that a higher intake of fruits, probably dietary fiber, and fish reduce the risk of COPD.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7309892PMC
April 2019

Omega-3 and Omega-6 Intake Modifies Asthma Severity and Response to Indoor Air Pollution in Children.

Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2019 06;199(12):1478-1486

1 Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

Higher indoor particulate matter (PM) concentrations are linked with increased asthma morbidity. Dietary intake of fatty acids, also linked with asthma outcomes, may influence this relationship. To determine the relationship between omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid intake and pediatric asthma morbidity, and the association between fatty acid intake and strength of indoor, PM-related asthma symptoms, albuterol use, and systemic inflammation. Analyses included 135 children with asthma enrolled in the AsthmaDIET Study. At baseline, 3 months, and 6 months, data included: week-long average home indoor concentration of PM ≤2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter and PM ≤10 μm in aerodynamic diameter, dietary intake of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, daily symptoms, and peripheral blood leukocytes. Asthma severity and lung function were assessed at baseline. Multivariable regression models, adjusted for known confounders, were used to determine associations between each fatty acid and outcomes of interest, with interaction terms (fatty acids × PM) in longitudinal analyses. Higher omega-6 intake associated with increased odds of increased asthma severity ( = 0.02), and lower FEV/FVC ratio ( = 0.01). Higher omega-3 intake associated with reduced effect of indoor PM ≤2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter on symptoms ( < 0.01), whereas higher omega-6 intake associated with amplified effect of indoor PM ≤2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter on symptoms and circulating neutrophil percentage ( < 0.01). Omega-3 and omega-6 intake are associated with pediatric asthma morbidity and may modify the asthmatic response to indoor PM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/rccm.201808-1474OCDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6580674PMC
June 2019

Doneness preferences, meat and meat-derived heterocyclic amines intake, and N-acetyltransferase 2 polymorphisms: association with colorectal adenoma in Japanese Brazilians.

Eur J Cancer Prev 2020 01;29(1):7-14

Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Center for Public Health Sciences, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan.

Intake of heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and other mutagenic compounds formed during cooking has been hypothesized to be responsible for the positive association observed between red meat and colorectal cancer. We evaluated whether well-done/very well-done preferences for various meat and fish items, higher intakes of meat and fish, and meat-derived and fish-derived HCA are associated with the risk of colorectal adenoma (CRA) in a Japanese-Brazilian population. We selected 302 patients with adenoma and 403 control individuals who underwent total colonoscopy between 2007 and 2013, and collected information on aspects of meat intake using a detailed questionnaire. We also estimated HCA intake of the study participants using an HCA database that matched the cooking methods of this population. Latent class analysis on the basis of response to doneness preferences for different cooking methods of commonly consumed meat and fish items identified four distinct subgroups. Compared with the subgroup characterized by a preference for rare/medium well-done cooking for most meat and fish items, the odds ratio of CRA for the well-done/very well-done preference subgroup was 1.19 (95% confidence interval: 0.51-2.75). High intake of mixed-meat dishes was suggestively associated inversely with CRA, whereas a high intake of poultry was associated positively with CRA. No clear association with intake of total or specific HCAs and no effect modification by N-acetyltransferase 2 acetylation genotype were observed. We found no statistically significant associations between meat and HCA intake and CRA. These findings do not support a positive association between meat and meat-derived HCA intake and the risk of CRA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CEJ.0000000000000506DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6761046PMC
January 2020

Effects of quercetin supplementation on glycemic control among patients with metabolic syndrome and related disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Phytother Res 2019 May 8;33(5):1330-1340. Epub 2019 Mar 8.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran.

This systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials was performed to determine the effect of quercetin supplementation on glycemic control among patients with metabolic syndrome and related disorders. Databases including PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched until August 30, 2018. Nine studies with 10 effect sizes out of 357 selected reports were identified eligible to be included in current meta-analysis. The pooled findings indicated that quercetin supplementation did not affect fasting plasma glucose (FPG), homeostasis model of assessment-estimated insulin resistance, and hemoglobin A1c levels. In subgroup analysis, quercetin supplementation significantly reduced FPG in studies with a duration of ≥8 weeks (weighted mean difference [WMD]: -0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI; -1.81, -0.07]) and used quercetin in dosages of ≥500 mg/day (WMD: -1.08; 95% CI [-2.08, -0.07]). In addition, subgroup analysis revealed a significant reduction in insulin concentrations following supplementation with quercetin in studies that enrolled individuals aged <45 years (WMD: -1.36; 95% CI [-1.76, -0.97]) and that used quercetin in dosages of ≥500 mg/day (WMD: -1.57; 95% CI [-1.98, -1.16]). In summary, subgroup analysis based on duration of ≥8 weeks and used quercetin in dosages of ≥500 mg/day significantly reduced FPG levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ptr.6334DOI Listing
May 2019

Validation of a Quantitative Food Frequency Questionnaire for a Japanese Population in Hawaii.

Int J Vitam Nutr Res 2019 Sep 4;89(3-4):200-209. Epub 2019 Mar 4.

Indigenous and Global Health Research Group, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.

Objective: To measure the validity of a quantitative food frequency questionnaire (QFFQ). Design A cross-sectional validation study of the QFFQ against a four-day food record (4DR) using Spearman correlation, cross-classification, kappa statistics, and Bland-Altman plotting. Setting The Gastroenterology Department of Kaiser Permanente Hawaii. Subjects: 76 healthy Japanese American men and women, aged 40-75 years. Results Somewhat stronger average correlations were observed between the QFFQ and the 4DR for macronutrients compared to micronutrients (Spearman of 0.47 vs. 0.35). Moderate correlations between the two tools were observed for macronutrients (including saturated fatty acids and dietary fibre), iron, β-carotene, vitamin C, and ethanol (: 0.38-0.58). Overall, stronger correlations were found among men than women between the two tools (mean 0.41 vs. 0.26). In a cross classification analysis, for more than 75% of the observations, a complete to relative agreement between the two methods was observed for fat, α-carotene, folate, vitamin D, and ethanol. Sex difference in agreement was minimal in cross-classification (overall extreme misclassification of 9.80% for men and 12.40% for women). Bland-Altman plots showed over-estimations of dietary fibre and α-carotene intake and an under-estimation of cholesterol intake by the QFFQ at high levels of consumption. However, the QFFQ estimation for fat, dietary fibre, folate, cholesterol, α-carotene, vitamins D and C, and ethanol intake was less than 7% different compared to the 4DR. Conclusions: The QFFQ has an adequate validity for fat, folate, vitamin D, and ethanol and can correctly categorize participants for intakes of cholesterol, dietary fibre, α-carotene, and zinc.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1024/0300-9831/a000562DOI Listing
September 2019

The effects of coenzyme Q10 supplementation on biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in among coronary artery disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Inflammopharmacology 2019 Apr 13;27(2):233-248. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran.

Objective: Systemic inflammation and oxidative stress significantly contribute in developing coronary artery disease (CAD). This systematic review and meta-analysis was aimed to determine the effects of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress among patients with CAD.

Methods: The electronic databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library databases were systematically searched until Oct 2018. The quality assessment and heterogeneity of the selected randomized clinical Trials (RCTs) were examined using the Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool, and Q and I tests, respectively. Given the presence of heterogeneity, random-effects model or fixed-effect model were used to pool standardized mean differences (SMDs) as summary effect sizes.

Results: A total of 13 clinical RCTs of 912 potential citations were found to be eligible for the current meta-analysis. The pooled findings for biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress demonstrated that CoQ10 supplementation significantly increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) (SMD 2.63; 95% CI, 1.17, 4.09, P < 0.001; I = 94.5%) and catalase (CAT) levels (SMD 1.00; 95% CI, 0.57, 1.43, P < 0.001; I = 24.5%), and significantly reduced malondialdehyde (MDA) (SMD - 4.29; 95% CI - 6.72, - 1.86, P = 0.001; I = 97.6%) and diene levels (SMD - 2.40; 95% CI - 3.11, - 1.68, P < 0.001; I = 72.6%). We did not observe any significant effect of CoQ10 supplementation on C-reactive protein (CRP) (SMD - 0.62; 95% CI - 1.31, 0.08, P = 0.08; I = 87.9%), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) (SMD 0.22; 95% CI - 1.07, 1.51, P = 0.73; I = 89.7%), interleukin-6 (IL-6) (SMD - 1.63; 95% CI - 3.43, 0.17, P = 0.07; I = 95.2%), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) levels (SMD 0.14; 95% CI - 0.77, 1.04, P = 0.76; I = 78.7%).

Conclusions: Overall, this meta-analysis demonstrated CoQ10 supplementation increased SOD and CAT, and decreased MDA and diene levels, but did not affect CRP, TNF-α, IL-6, and GPx levels among patients with CAD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10787-019-00572-xDOI Listing
April 2019

Prevalence of Known Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Multiethnic Urban Youth in Edmonton: Findings From the WHY ACT NOW Project.

Can J Diabetes 2019 Apr 9;43(3):207-214. Epub 2018 Oct 9.

Indigenous and Global Health Research Group, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Electronic address:

Objectives: The Canadian Diabetes Risk Assessment Questionnaire (CANRISK) is a validated, evidence-based, self-administered tool to assess the risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus in multiethnic Canadian adults. Identifying individuals at high risk for type 2 diabetes allows early intervention that improves modifiable risk factors. This study examined the risk factors for type 2 diabetes in multiethnic urban youth in Edmonton, Alberta.

Methods: An interviewer-administered questionnaire was developed based on CANRISK variables, such as age, gender, ethnicity, family history of diabetes, medical history of high blood sugar or high blood pressure, anthropometric measurements, physical activity and dietary intake. Between October 2013 and March 2014, data were collected from a convenience sample of 557 (328 girls and 229 boys) multiethnic youth 11 to 23 years of age in 12 institutions in Edmonton, such as public schools, after-school programs and colleges.

Results: Participating youth (N=529) with self-identified ethnicity were included in the analyses: 109 Indigenous (20.6%); 96 African and Middle Eastern (18.1%); 129 Asian (24.4%); and 195 European (36.9%). More than 70% of the youth had 2 or more risk factors for type 2 diabetes. The participants were classified as low risk (75.6%; n=400); moderate risk (21.2%; n=112); or high risk (3.2%; n=17), with the highest proportion of moderate- and high-CANRISK score categories (52.7%) found in the Asian youth. Boys (p<0.0001) and Indigenous participants (p<0.001) were more likely to have a greater number of risk factors for type 2 diabetes compared to girls and non-Indigenous youth, respectively. Of the participants, 26.7% (n=141) were overweight or obese, more than 45% of the participants (n=245) were physically inactive, and 17.8% of the participants (n=94) did not consume sufficient amounts of fruits and vegetables to meet daily recommendations.

Conclusions: Almost 25% of the participating multiethnic youth 11 to 23 years of age scored in the moderate or high category of CANRISK. The most prevalent risk factors were ethnicity, followed by physical inactivity, overweight or obesity and low fruit and vegetable consumption. A validated type 2 diabetes screening tool for youth as well as culturally appropriate, evidence-based and multidisciplinary diet and lifestyle interventions aiming to improve modifiable type 2 diabetes risk factors in multiethnic youth, particularly targeting socioeconomically disadvantaged and immigrant children and youth, should be developed, implemented and evaluated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcjd.2018.10.002DOI Listing
April 2019