Publications by authors named "Fang-Ping Lu"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Cognitive impairment and associated risk factors in older adult hemodialysis patients: a cross-sectional survey.

Sci Rep 2020 07 27;10(1):12542. Epub 2020 Jul 27.

Department of Nephrology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, State Key Laboratory of Kidney Disease, Beijing, 100853, China.

The clinical epidemiological features of cognitive impairment in Chinese older adult patients undergoing hemodialysis are not clear, we aimed to identify the extent and patterns of cognitive impairment among those patients. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 613 hemodialysis patients aged 50 to 80 from 11 centers in Beijing. A neuropsychological battery of 11 tests covering domains of attention/processing speed, executive function, memory, language, and visuospatial function was applied, patients were classified as none, mild, or major cognitive impairment according to the fifth version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria for cognitive impairment. Compared with Chinese population norms, 37.2% of the participants had mild cognitive impairment, 43.7% had major cognitive impairment. Memory and language were the most severe impaired domains in the mild cognitive impairment group, attention and visuospatial function domains were the most serious impaired domains in the major cognitive impairment group. Concomitant impairment across multiple cognitive domains was common. Factors associated with major cognitive impairment included age, education level, history of stroke and hypertension, dialysis vintage, and single-pool Kt/V. There is a high frequency of cognitive impairment in Chinese older adult hemodialysis patients, with varying severity and concomitant impairment across multiple domains.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-69482-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7385128PMC
July 2020

One-year patency rate of native arteriovenous fistulas reconstructed by vascular stripping in hemodialysis patients with venous neointimal hyperplasia.

J Vasc Surg 2015 Jan 15;61(1):192-6. Epub 2014 Aug 15.

Department of Nephrology and Blood Purification Center, First Hospital of Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.

Objective: There are limited therapeutic measures for stenosis of arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) due to venous neointimal hyperplasia (VNH). In the current retrospective study, we reviewed the clinical data of hemodialysis patients who underwent AVF reconstruction by VNH stripping. The primary measure of interest was the secondary patency rate of the restored AVF.

Methods: The study included hemodialysis patients who underwent AVF reconstruction by VNH stripping (group A), AVF reconstruction proximal to the original fistula (group B), or creation of a new AVF (group C). Patency was evaluated immediately after the surgery and at follow-up visits.

Results: Of 353 patients who underwent AVF reconstructions, 327 (91.9%) were for late AVF failure. The final analysis included 305 patients: 76, 128, and 101 patients in groups A, B, and C, respectively. The three groups were comparable in age, sex, causes for AVF, AVF sites, and the artery for the AVF (P > .05). At 3-month follow-up, the secondary AVF patency rate was comparable across the three groups at 93.4%, 92.2%, and 92.1% in groups A, B, and C, respectively. The patency rate at 6 and 12 months was also comparable across groups A, B, and C at 89.5%, 89.8%, and 88.1% at 6 months and 84.2%, 85.9%, and 81.2% at 12 months, respectively.

Conclusions: Reconstructing the AVF by surgically removing VNH is an effective technique for late hemodialysis access failure, with maximal preservation of blood vessels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2014.07.010DOI Listing
January 2015

Restoration of autologous arteriovenous fistula by vascular stripping in a hemodialysis patient with venous neointimal hyperplasia.

J Vasc Access 2012 Oct-Dec;13(4):524-6

Department of Nephrology and Blood Purification Center, First Hospital of Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.

A significant number of arteriovenous fistulae fail because of venous neointimal hyperplasia-associated vascular blockage. We developed a surgical technique for repairing arteriovenous fistulae by surgically removing neointimal hyperplasia and vessel re-anastomosis. Here, we report the successful treatment of a case that developed arteriovenous fistula stenosis because of venous neointimal hyperplasia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5301/jva.5000090DOI Listing
May 2015