Publications by authors named "Faisal E Aljofi"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Role of thin gingival phenotype and inadequate keratinized mucosa width (<2 mm) as risk indicators for peri-implantitis and peri-implant mucositis.

J Periodontol 2021 Apr 15. Epub 2021 Apr 15.

Department of Periodontics, University of Washington School of Dentistry, Seattle, WA, USA.

Background: There is growing evidence on the impact of thin gingival phenotype (TnP) and inadequate keratinized mucosa width (KMW <2 mm) around dental implants on peri-implant health. This study investigated the role of TnP and inadequate KMW (<2 mm) as risk indicators for peri-implantitis and mucositis and on dental patient-reported outcomes.

Methods: Sixty-three patients with 193 implants (mean follow-up of 6.9 ± 3.7 years) were given a clinical and radiographic examination and a questionnaire to assess patient awareness of food impaction and pain/discomfort. Chi-squared tests and regression analysis for clustered data were used to compare outcomes.

Results: Implants with TnP had a statistically higher prevalence of peri-implantitis (27.1% versus 11.3%; PR, 3.32; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.64-6.72; P = 0.001) peri-implant mucositis (42.7% versus 33%; PR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.12-2.9; P = 0.016) and pain/discomfort during oral hygiene (25% versus 5%; PR, 3.7; 95% CI, 1.06-12.96; P = 0.044) than thick phenotype. Implants with inadequate KMW had a statistically higher prevalence of peri-implantitis (24.1% versus 17%; PR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.07-3.25; P = 0.027) and peri-implant mucositis (46.6% versus 34.1%; PR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1-2.33; P = 0.05) and pain/discomfort during oral hygiene (28% versus 10%; PR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.1-5.1; P = 0.027) than the adequate KMW. TnP was strongly associated with inadequate KMW (PR = 3.18; 95% CI, 1.69-6.04; P <0.001).

Conclusion: TnP and inadequate KMW (<2 mm) may be significant risk indicators for peri-implant disease and pain/discomfort during brushing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/JPER.20-0792DOI Listing
April 2021

Interproximal open contacts between implant restorations and adjacent natural teeth as a risk-indicator for peri-implant disease-A cross-sectional study.

Clin Oral Implants Res 2021 Feb 25. Epub 2021 Feb 25.

Department of Periodontics, University of Washington School of Dentistry, Seattle, WA, USA.

Objectives: The primary aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between interproximal open contacts and peri-implant disease. The secondary aim was to assess patient-reported outcome measures in relation to contact status.

Materials And Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on 61 patients with 142 implants adjacent to at least one natural tooth. Patients underwent a clinical examination to assess contact status and width, plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), periodontal probing depths (PPD), and bleeding on probing (BoP). Radiographic marginal bone level was measured in vertical bitewings taken within one year. A diagnosis was given to each implant. Last, subjects completed a brief questionnaire. Rao-scott chi-squared tests and generalized estimating equations (GEE) models were used to compare outcomes between groups.

Results: Seventy-seven (54.2%) implants were found to have ≥1 interproximal open contact. Sixty-five (45.8%) implants had closed contacts only. Implants with interproximal open contacts were significantly associated with peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis (p = .003) and increased prevalence of peri-implant disease (adjusted PR = 1.57; 95% CI: 1.09-2.27, p = .015). Open contact status was also associated with higher PPD (p = .045), PI scores (p = .036), and GI scores (p = .021). Open contact prevalence was 75.4% on the patient-level and 54.2% on the implant-level, involving the mesial surface of the implant restorations 68.5% of the time (p < .001).

Conclusion: Interproximal open contacts between implant restorations and adjacent natural teeth are a risk indicator for peri-implant disease. Adequate contact between implant restorations and natural teeth may contribute to the health of peri-implant tissues.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/clr.13730DOI Listing
February 2021