Publications by authors named "Faik Tugut"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effects of boron on the mechanical properties of polymethylmethacrylate denture base material.

Eur Oral Res 2021 Jan;55(1):45-53

Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry,Sakarya University, Sakarya,Turkey.

Purpose: The objective of this study was to determine whether the addition of different types of boron (Borax, Boric Acid and Colemanite) to polymethyl methacrylate denture base resin would improve flexural and impact strengths, and surface hardness of polymethyl methacrylate.

Materials And Methods: Borax, Boric acid, Colemanite were added to heat polymerized polymethyl methacrylate specimens were prepared for flexural strength (65x10x2.5 mm), impact strength (50x6x4 mm), and hardness (20x6x4 mm) tests according to the manufacturers' instructions (n=10). To determine flexural strength of the specimens, they were loaded until failure on a universal testing machine using a three point bending test. Specimens were subjected to the Charpy impact test machine. Hardness of the specimens was measured with an analog shoremeter Shore D. The data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (α=0.05).

Results: The highest mean flexural strength value was seen in 3% Borax group and followed by 1% Colemanite group. In addition, the highest mean impact strength value was recorded in 1% Colemanite group, and differences between 1% Colemanite group and control group were found to be statistically significant (p=0,001). Furthermore, there was significant difference in hardness between control group and all other groups (p<0.001).

Conclusion: The addition of 1% Colemanite to polymethyl methacrylate improved the mechanical properties of PMMA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.26650/eor.20210132DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8055257PMC
January 2021

Airborne-particle abrasion; searching the right parameter.

J Dent Sci 2018 Dec 30;13(4):293-300. Epub 2018 Mar 30.

Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Cumhuriyet University, Sivas, Turkey.

Background/purpose: Air-particle abrasion process used to increase surface roughness in order to increase metal-ceramic bond strength varies in each study. This study aims to optimize the air-particle abrasion protocol.

Material And Methods: 820 cylindrical nickel-chrome specimens divided equally into 82 groups (n:10). The specimens' s surfaces were air-particle abraded with 50, 110, 250 μm AlO at 25, 50,75 psi for 10, 20, 30 s at a distance of 10, 20, 30 mm. To determine the surface roughness, profilometer and atomic force microscope were used. Veneering ceramic was fired onto the specimens and shear bond tests were performed with a universal testing machine. Statistical analyzed were performed using analysis of variance (Kolmogorov-Smirnov).

Results: The difference of surface roughness between all groups were statistically significant (P < .05). The highest surface roughness value was measured in 110 μm, 75 psi, 20 mm and 30 s. The higher bond strength values were obtained in 110 μm, 75 psi groups and no statistically significant difference was observed within each group.

Conclusion: While all the air-particle abrasion parameters were effective on surface roughness, only the pressure and grain size make statistically significant difference on shear bond strength.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jds.2018.02.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6388809PMC
December 2018

Tensile Bond Strength between Soft Liners and Two Chemically Different Denture Base Materials: Effect of Thermocycling.

J Prosthodont 2016 Jun 16;25(4):319-23. Epub 2015 Sep 16.

Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Cumhuriyet University, Sivas, Turkey.

Purpose: The bond strength of soft denture liner to a recently introduced denture base resin after thermocycling has not been compared to traditional denture base materials. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of thermocycling on the tensile bond strength of soft denture liners to two chemically different denture base resins, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA).

Materials And Methods: A total of 48 PMMA and UDMA tensile test specimens were fabricated by attaching two different soft denture liners (Molloplast-B, Permaflex) according to the manufacturers' instructions and assigned to two groups. Half of the specimens for each group were stored in water for 1 week, and the other half were thermocycled (5000 cycles) between baths of 5°C and 55°C. Specimens were mounted on a universal testing machine with a 5 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey-Kramer multiple comparisons tests (α = 0.05).

Results: The highest bond strength was measured in the specimens from the UDMA/Molloplast groups, and the lowest was seen in the PMMA/Permaflex group. No significant difference in bond strength was detected in PMMA/Permaflex groups after thermocycling (p = 0.082), whereas other groups exhibited significant differences after thermocycling (p < 0.05).

Conclusions: Thermocycling decreased the bond strength values in both the PMMA and UDMA groups. Regardless of types of soft liners, PMMA specimens presented lower bond strength values than UDMA specimens, both before and after thermocycling.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jopr.12296DOI Listing
June 2016

Effects of different surface treatments on the bond strength of acrylic denture teeth to polymethylmethacrylate denture base material.

Photomed Laser Surg 2014 Sep 7;32(9):512-6. Epub 2014 Aug 7.

1 Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Cumhuriyet University , Sivas, Turkey .

Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of various surface pretreatments in the ridge lap area of acrylic resin denture teeth on the shear bond strength to heat-polymerized polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) denture base resin.

Background Data: Tooth debonding of the denture is a major problem for patients with removable prostheses.

Methods: A total of 84 central incisor denture teeth were used in this study. Seven test groups with 12 specimens for each group were prepared as follows: untreated (control, group C), ground, with a tungsten carbide bur (group H), airborne-particle abrasion (group AA), primed with methyl methacrylate (group M), treated with izobutyl methacrylate (group iBMA), Eclipse Bonding Agent applied (group E), and Er:YAG laser irradiated (group L). Test specimens were produced according to the manufacturers' instructions and mounted to a universal testing machine for shear testing with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were evaluated by one way variance analysis (ANOVA) and Tukey's test (α=0.05).

Results: Similar bond strength values were found between groups L and M, and these were the highest shear bond strengths among the groups. The lowest one was observed in group E. All surface treatments, except group E, exhibited significant difference when compared with group C (p<0.05).

Conclusions: Lasing of the ridge lap area to enhance the bond strength of acrylic resin denture teeth to PMMA denture base resin might be an alternative to wetting with MMA monomer. To overcome tooth debonding, surface treatment of the ridge lap area should be performed as part of denture fabrication.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/pho.2014.3732DOI Listing
September 2014

In vitro comparison of the cytotoxicity and water sorption of two different denture base systems.

J Prosthodont 2015 Feb 11;24(2):152-5. Epub 2014 Jun 11.

Associate Professor, Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Cumhuriyet University, Sivas, Turkey.

Purpose: Denture base resins have the potential to cause cytotoxicity in vivo, and the mechanical properties of resins are affected by water sorption. There is a correlation between residual monomer and water sorption. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate water sorption and cytotoxicity of light-activated urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) denture base resin compared to a conventional heat-activated polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resin.

Materials And Methods: Two denture base resins, heat-activated PMMA (Meliodent) and light-activated UDMA (Eclipse), were used in this study. Cytotoxicity (5 × 1 mm(2) ) and water sorption (1 × 1 mm(2) ) specimens were made following the manufacturers' instructions (n = 10). Cytotoxicity tests of denture base resins were performed according to ISO10993-5:1999, and water sorption was evaluated according to ISO 1567:1997. ANOVA tests were employed for evaluating data (α = 0.05).

Results: There was no cytotoxic effect in either the PMMA or UDMA group. In addition, contrary to short-term water storage, a significantly lower water sorption value was shown for UDMA resins compared to PMMA resins in both 3- and 6-month storage periods (p = 0.043 and p = 0.002, respectively).

Conclusion: The tested denture base materials adhered to the ISO standards for both cytotoxicity and water sorption. The cytotoxicity of the light-activated UDMA resin tested was statistically similar to that of the heat-activated PMMA resin; however, the UDMA resin exhibited decreased water sorption in long-term water storage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jopr.12162DOI Listing
February 2015

Investigation of bonding properties of denture bases to silicone-based soft denture liner immersed in isobutyl methacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate.

J Adv Prosthodont 2014 Apr 22;6(2):121-5. Epub 2014 Apr 22.

Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Cumhuriyet University, Sivas, Turkey.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the bonding properties of denture bases to silicone-based soft denture liners immersed in isobutyl methacrylate (iBMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) for various lengths of time.

Materials And Methods: Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) test specimens were fabricated (75 mm in length, 12 mm in diameter at the thickest section, and 7 mm at the thinnest section) and then randomly assigned to five groups (n=15); untreated (Group 1), resilient liner immersed in iBMA for 1 minute (Group 2), resilient liner immersed in iBMA for 3 minutes (Group 3), resilient liner immersed in HEMA for 1 minute (Group 4), and resilient liner immersed in HEMA for 3 minutes (Group 5). The resilient liner specimens were processed between 2 PMMA blocks. Bonding strength of the liners to PMMA was compared by tensile test with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Data were evaluated by 1-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey-Kramer multiple comparisons tests (α=0.05).

Results: The highest mean value of force was observed in Group 3 specimens. The differences between groups were statistically significant (P<.05), except between Group 1 and Group 4 (P=.063).

Conclusion: Immersion of silicone-based soft denture liners in iBMA for 3 minutes doubled the tensile bond strength between the silicone soft liner and PMMA denture base materials compared to the control group.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4047/jap.2014.6.2.121DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4024556PMC
April 2014

Shear bond strength of denture teeth to two chemically different denture base resins after various surface treatments.

J Prosthodont 2014 Feb 25;23(2):152-6. Epub 2013 Jul 25.

Associate Professor, Cumhuriyet University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Prosthodontics, Sivas, Turkey.

Purpose: Debonding of acrylic teeth from the denture base remains a major problem in prosthodontics. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of various surface treatments on the shear bond strength of the two chemically different denture base resins-polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA).

Materials And Methods: Two denture base resins, heat-cured PMMA (Meliodent) and light-activated UDMA (Eclipse), were used in this study. A total of 60 molar acrylic denture teeth were randomly separated into four groups (n = 15), according to surface treatment: acrylic untreated (group AC), Eclipse untreated (group EC), treated with eclipse bonding agent (group EB), and Er:YAG laser-irradiated eclipse (group EL). Shear bond strength test specimens were prepared according to the manufacturers' instructions. Specimens were subjected to shear bond strength test by a universal testing machine with a 1 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison tests (α = 0.05).

Results: The highest mean bond strength was observed in specimens of group EB, and the lowest was observed in group EC specimens. A statistically significant difference in shear bond strength was found among all groups (p < 0.001), except between groups EC and EL (p = 0.61).

Conclusion: The two chemically different denture base polymers showed different shear bond strength values to acrylic denture teeth. Laser-irradiation of the adhesive surface was found to be ineffective on improving bond strength of acrylic denture teeth to denture base resin. Eclipse bonding agent should be used as a part of denture fabrication with the Eclipse Resin System.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jopr.12081DOI Listing
February 2014

Effects of sandblasting and laser irradiation on shear bond strength of low-fusing porcelain to titanium.

J Adhes Dent 2013 Feb;15(1):55-63

Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Cumhuriyet University, Slvas, Turkey.

Purpose: To investigate the bond strength of low-fusing porcelain to commercially pure titanium (Ti) that was laser irradiated with different levels of energy and sandblasted.

Materials And Methods: A total of 30 titanium rods (10 mm in length and 12 mm in diameter) were prepared. The rods were divided into three groups (n = 10) according to surface treatments: SB: sandblasted; L1: Nd:YAG laser irradiated at 100 mJ, 10 Hz, and 1 W; L2: Nd:YAG laser irradiated at 200 mJ, 10 Hz, and 2 W. After surface treatment, low-fusing porcelain was applied onto the titanium specimens according to the manufacturer's instructions, and these specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h. The shear bond strength test was performed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. In addition, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests were used to compare the bond strength results (α = 0.05). SEM and EDS analysis were also performed for one specimen of each group after the shear bond strength test to evaluate the nature of the fracture surface.

Results: Group L2 produced the highest shear bond strength among the groups. There was a statistically significant difference in shear bond strength between groups L1 and L2 (p < 0.001). Nevertheless, no significant difference was found between groups SB and L1. EDS analysis revealed that laser treatment reduced presence of oxygen on the surface of Ti. In contrast to the sandblasted specimens, laser-irradiated specimens showed predominantly adhesive failure.

Conclusion: Laser treatment may be an alternative method to sandblasting for enhancing the bond strength of low-fusing porcelain to commercially pure titanium.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3290/j.jad.a28673DOI Listing
February 2013

Tensile bond strength of silicone-based soft denture liner to two chemically different denture base resins after various surface treatments.

Lasers Med Sci 2013 Jan 25;28(1):119-23. Epub 2012 Mar 25.

Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Cumhuriyet University, 58140, Sivas, Turkey.

This study evaluated the effect of various surface treatments on the tensile bond strength of a silicone-based soft denture liner to two chemically different denture base resins, heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), and light-activated urethane dimethacrylate or Eclipse denture base resin. PMMA test specimens were fabricated and relined with a silicone-based soft denture liner (group AC). Eclipse test specimens were prepared according to the manufacturer's recommendation. Before they were relined with a silicone-based soft denture liner, each received one of three surface treatments: untreated (control, group EC), Eclipse bonding agent applied (group EB), and laser-irradiated (group EL). Tensile bond strength tests (crosshead speed = 5 mm/min) were performed for all specimens, and the results were analyzed using the analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test (p = 0.05). Eclipse denture base and PMMA resins presented similar bond strengths to the silicone-based soft denture liner. The highest mean force was observed in group EL specimens, and the tensile bond strengths in group EL were significantly different (p < 0.05) from those in the other groups.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10103-012-1082-7DOI Listing
January 2013

Effect of Er:YAG laser application on the shear bond strength and microleakage between resin cements and Y-TZP ceramics.

Lasers Med Sci 2012 Mar 21;27(2):333-8. Epub 2011 Jan 21.

Department of Prosthodontics, Cumhuriyet University, Faculty of Dentistry, 58140, Sivas, Turkey.

The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation on shear bond strength and microleakage between resin cements and yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP) ceramics. Eighty disc specimens of Y-TZP ceramics (6 mm × 4 mm) were prepared. The specimens were divided into two groups according to surface treatment (control and Er:YAG laser-treated). The control and lased specimens were separated into two groups for shear bond strength test (n = 20), and microleakage evaluation (n = 10). Specimens were subjected to shear bond strength test by a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Specimens for microleakage evaluation were then sealed with nail varnish, stained with 0.5% basic fuchsin for 24 h, sectioned, and evaluated under a stereomicroscope. The data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey-Kramer multiple comparisons tests (α = 0.05) for shear bond strengths and a two related-samples tests (α = 0.05) for microleakage scores. Higher bond strength values were found in the laser-treated groups compared to the control groups. Microleakage scores among the groups showed that the laser-treated specimens had lower microleakage scores than those of control specimens in the adhesive-ceramic interface. Roughening surface of Y-TZP ceramic by Er:YAG laser increased the shear bond strengths of ceramic to dentin and reduced the microleakage scores.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10103-011-0883-4DOI Listing
March 2012

Strength of the bond between a silicone lining material and denture resin after Er:YAG laser treatments with different pulse durations and levels of energy.

Lasers Med Sci 2012 Mar 14;27(2):281-5. Epub 2010 Dec 14.

Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Cumhuriyet, 58140, Sivas, Turkey.

The purpose of this study was to investigate the tensile strength of the bond between a silicone lining material and heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) denture base resin after Er:YAG laser treatment with different pulse durations and energy levels. PMMA test specimens were fabricated and each received one of six surface treatments: no treatment (control), and five Er:YAG laser treatments comprising (1) 100 mJ, 1 W, long pulse duration, (2) 200 mJ, 2 W, long pulse duration, (3) 200 mJ, 2 W, very short pulse duration, (4) 300 mJ, 3 W, long pulse duration, and (5) 400 mJ, 4 W, long pulse duration. The resilient liner specimens (n = 15) were processed between two PMMA blocks. The tensile strengths of the bonds between the liners and PMMA were determined using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. The mode of failure was characterized as cohesive, adhesive, or mixed modes. One-way ANOVA and the post hoc Tukey-Kramer multiple comparisons test were used to analyze the data (α = 0.05). There was a statistically significantly difference in tensile bond strength between laser-treated and untreated specimens (P < 0.05). The 300-mJ, 3 W, long pulse duration laser treatment produced the highest mean tensile bond strength. In addition, the long pulse duration treatments resulted in greater bond strength than very short pulse duration treatment (P < 0.05). Laser irradiation produced significant surface texture changes of the denture base material and improved the adhesion between denture base and soft lining material. In addition, different pulse durations and energy levels were found to effectively increase the strength of the bond.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10103-010-0862-1DOI Listing
March 2012

Effect of different surface treatments on tensile bond strength of silicone-based soft denture liner.

Lasers Med Sci 2011 Nov 21;26(6):783-8. Epub 2010 Aug 21.

Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Cumhuriyet, 58140, Sivas, Turkey.

Failure of the bond between the acrylic resin and resilient liner material is commonly encountered in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface treatments (sandblasting, Er:YAG, Nd:YAG, and KTP lasers) on tensile bond strength of silicone-based soft denture liner. Polymethyl methacrylate test specimens were fabricated and each received one of eight surface treatments: untreated (control), sandblasted, Er:YAG laser irradiated, sandblasted + Er:YAG laser irradiated, Nd:YAG laser irradiated, sandblasted + Nd:YAG laser irradiated, KTP laser irradiated, and sandblasted + KTP laser irradiated. The resilient liner specimens (n = 15) were processed between two polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) blocks. Bonding strength of the liners to PMMA were compared by tensile test with the use of a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests were used to analyze the data (α = 0.05). Altering the polymethyl methacrylate surface by Er:YAG laser significantly increased the bond strengths in polymethyl methacrylate/silicone specimens, however, sandblasting before applying a lining material had a weakening effect on the bond. In addition, Nd:YAG and KTP lasers were found to be ineffective for increasing the strength of the bond.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10103-010-0825-6DOI Listing
November 2011