Publications by authors named "Faes D Kerkhof"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The digital human forearm and hand.

J Anat 2018 11 17;233(5):557-566. Epub 2018 Sep 17.

Department of Development and Regeneration, KU Leuven Campus Kulak, Kortrijk, Belgium.

How changes in anatomy affect joint biomechanics can be studied using musculoskeletal modelling, making it a valuable tool to explore joint function in healthy and pathological joints. However, gathering the anatomical, geometrical and physiological data necessary to create a model can be challenging. Very few integrated datasets exist and even less raw data is openly available to create new models. Therefore, the goal of the present study is to create an integrated digital forearm and make the raw data available via an open-access database. An un-embalmed cadaveric arm was digitized using 7T MRI and CT scans. 3D geometrical models of bones, cartilage, muscle and muscle pathways were created. After MRI and CT scanning, physiological muscle parameters (e.g. muscle volume, mass, length, pennation angle, physiological cross-sectional area, tendon length) were obtained via detailed dissection. After dissection, muscle biopsies were fixated and confocal microscopy was used to visualize and measure sarcomere lengths. This study provides an integrated anatomical dataset on which complete and accurate musculoskeletal models of the hand can be based. By creating a 3D digital human forearm, including all relevant anatomical parameters, a more realistic musculoskeletal model can be created. Furthermore, open access to the anatomical dataset makes it possible for other researchers to use these data in the development of a musculoskeletal model of the hand.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/joa.12877DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6183001PMC
November 2018

Trapeziometacarpal stabilization through dorsoradial ligament reconstruction: An early post-surgery in vivo biomechanical analyses.

J Orthop Res 2018 11 23;36(11):2851-2864. Epub 2018 Jul 23.

Department of Development and Regeneration, KU Leuven Campus Kulak, Kortrijk, Belgium.

Ligament reconstruction can provide pain relief in patients with a painful, unstable, pre-arthritic trapeziometacarpal (TMC) joint. Imbrication of the dorsoradial ligament (DRL) has been proposed as a minimal invasive stabilization technique. It requires less invasive surgery than an Eaton-Littler technique and shows promising long-term clinical outcome. We used dynamic CT to objectively review the effects of the imbrication. Four patients with pain and laxity at the TMC joint, but without radiographic signs of osteoarthritis, were recruited. Dynamic CT scans were made during active thumb abduction-adduction, flexion-extension, and two functional grip tasks using a radiolucent jig. Scans of the patients were acquired before and 3 to 6 months after DRL reconstruction. Motion of each bone in the articular chain of the thumb was quantified. In addition, we mapped changes in the contact patterns between the articular facets during the entire thumb motion. After DRL imbrication, we found no overall decrease in MC1 movement in three out of four patients. Furthermore, no increase in TMC joint congruency, defined as proximity area size, was found for three out of four patients. Pre- and post-operative differences in congruency across different tasks were patient-dependent and relatively small. We demonstrated that, from a biomechanical perspective, there is high variability in post-operative outcome between patients that undergo identical surgical procedures performed by the same surgeon. A post-operative decrease in range of motion, increase in joint congruency or decrease in proximity area shift during thumb motion is not omnipresent. © 2018 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:2851-2864, 2018.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jor.24103DOI Listing
November 2018

Insights into the musculature of the bonobo hand.

J Anat 2018 Jun 25. Epub 2018 Jun 25.

Muscles & Movement, Biomedical Sciences Group, University of Leuven Campus Kulak, Kortrijk, Belgium.

The human hand is well known for its unique dexterity which is largely facilitated by a highly mobile, long and powerful thumb that enables both tool manufacturing and use, a key component of human evolution. The bonobo (Pan paniscus), the closest extant relative to modern humans together with the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), also possesses good manipulative capabilities but with a lower level of dexterity compared with modern humans. Despite the close phylogenetic relationship between bonobos and humans, detailed quantitative data of the bonobo forelimb musculature remains largely lacking. To understand how morphology may influence dexterity, we investigated the functional anatomy of the bonobo hand using a unique sample of eight bonobo cadavers, along with one chimpanzee and one human (Homo sapiens) cadaver. We performed detailed dissections of unembalmed specimens to collect quantitative datasets of the extrinsic and intrinsic hand musculature, in addition to qualitative descriptions of the forelimb muscle configurations, allowing estimation of force-generating capacities for each functional group. Furthermore, we used medical imaging to quantify the articular surface of the trapeziometacarpal joint to estimate the intra-articular pressure. Our results show that the force-generating capacity for most functional groups of the extrinsic and intrinsic hand muscles in bonobos is largely similar to that of humans, with differences in relative importance of the extensors and rotators. The bonobo thumb musculature has a lower force-generating capacity than observed in the human specimen, but the estimated maximal intra-articular pressure is higher in bonobos. Most importantly, bonobos show a higher degree of functional coupling between the muscles of the thumb, index and lateral fingers than observed in humans. It is conceivable that differentiation and individualization of the hand muscles rather than relative muscle development explain the higher level of dexterity of humans compared with that of bonobos.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/joa.12841DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6081514PMC
June 2018

Subject-specific thumb muscle activity during functional tasks of daily life.

J Electromyogr Kinesiol 2016 Oct 1;30:131-6. Epub 2016 Jul 1.

Jan Palfijn Anatomy Lab, Department of Development and Regeneration, KU Leuven, Belgium.

Background: The trapeziometacarpal joint is subjected to high compressive forces during powerful pinch and grasp tasks due to muscle loading. In addition, muscle contraction is important for stability of the joint. The aim of the present study is to explore if different muscle activation patterns can be found between three functional tasks.

Methods: Isometric forces and fine-wire electromyographic (fEMG) activity produced by three intrinsic and four extrinsic thumb muscles were measured in 10 healthy female volunteers. The participants performed isometric contractions in a lateral key pinch, a power grasp and a jar twist task. The tasks were executed with and without EMG recording to verify if electrode placement influenced force production.

Results: A subject-specific muscle recruitment was found which remained largely unchanged across tasks. Extrinsic thumb muscles were significantly more active than intrinsic muscles in all tasks. Insertion of the fEMG electrodes decreased force production significantly in all tasks.

Conclusion: The thumb muscles display a high variability in muscle activity during functional tasks of daily life. The results of this study suggest that to produce a substantial amount of force, a well-integrated, but subject-specific, co-contraction between the intrinsic and extrinsic thumb muscles is necessary.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jelekin.2016.06.009DOI Listing
October 2016
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