Publications by authors named "Fady A Youssef"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A 51-Year-Old Woman With Rapidly Progressive Dyspnea.

Chest 2021 04 6;159(4):e251-e255. Epub 2021 Apr 6.

Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of California - Irvine, CA; Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Long Beach Memorial Medical Center, Long Beach, CA. Electronic address:

Case Presentation: A 51-year-old woman with a history of diabetes mellitus and anemia sought treatment at the emergency room for a 2-month history of dry cough and shortness of breath and a 1-week history of substernal chest tightness. One month before her presentation, she was seen at a separate hospital for dyspnea and was found to be anemic. She underwent chest radiography and CT scanning of the chest that was unrevealing to the cause of dyspnea. She received a blood transfusion, although no cause of the anemia was found. One week before presentation, she started experiencing dyspnea on exertion with associated chest pressure, prompting her to seek treatment at the emergency room. On presentation, she reported no fevers, night sweats, joint pain, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, orthopnea, edema, palpitations, lightheadedness, or syncope. She noted a 10- to 20-pound involuntary weight loss over 5 to 6 months. Of note, she had never undergone esophagogastroduodenoscopy or colonoscopy. Medications included an oral diabetic medication. She had no significant family history. She never smoked and had no history of illicit drug or alcohol use.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chest.2020.11.046DOI Listing
April 2021

Protected code blue: using in situ simulation to develop a protected code blue and modify staff training protocol-experience in a large community teaching hospital during the COVID-19 pandemic.

BMJ Open Qual 2021 02;10(1)

Department of Medicine, Division of Critical Care Medicine, MemorialCare - Long Beach Medical Center, Long Beach, California, USA

The surge in clinical demand, shortage in personal protective equipment and high-exposure risk for healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic has challenged hospital common practices and forced a reassessment of care delivery models. Code blue teams are highly specialised units that partake in life-saving situations that can jeopardise the safety of team members. There is a paucity of guidance in regards to proper infection control measures to protect the responders.This study describes a methodical approach to assessing vulnerabilities to transmission of SARS-CoV-2 within existing code blue practices, modalities to limit the number of code blue team responders and modifications to the protocol at a large community teaching hospital. The effort undertaken faced challenges due to the nature of the pandemic and the increased demand on healthcare workers. Quality improvement methods facilitated our protocol design and implementation. To this date, there has been no identified COVID-19 disease in any protected code blue (PCB) team members. We recommend that similar practices be considered and adopted widely and practised periodically.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjoq-2020-001097DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7886667PMC
February 2021

Ingestion of A Common Plant's Leaves Leads to Acute Respiratory Arrest and Paralysis: A Case Report.

Clin Pract Cases Emerg Med 2020 Aug;4(3):371-374

Memorial Care, Long Beach Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, Long Beach, California.

Background: Nicotiana glauca is a plant known to cause acute toxicity upon ingestion or dermal exposure due to the nicotinic alkaloid, anabasine. Nicotinic alkaloids cause toxicity by acting as agonists on nicotinic-type acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Initial stimulation of these receptors leads to symptoms such as tachycardia, miosis, and tremors. The effects of high doses of nicotinic alkaloids are biphasic, and eventual persistent depolarization of nAChRs at the neuromuscular junction occurs. This causes apnea, paralysis, and cardiovascular collapse.

Case Report: In this report, we present a case of respiratory arrest due to nicotinic alkaloid poisoning from the ingestion of Nicotiana glauca. The diagnosis was suspected after the patient's family gave a history of the patient ingesting a plant prior to arrival. They were able to also provide a physical sample of the plant.

Conclusion: The phone application, "Plant Snap", determined the plant species and helped confirm the diagnosis. This case describes how modern technology and thorough history taking can combine to provide the best possible patient care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5811/cpcem.2020.5.46703DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7434294PMC
August 2020

Intestinal Tuberculosis Masquerading as Crohn's Disease? A Case of Disseminated Tuberculosis after Anti-TNF Therapy for Suspected Crohn's Disease.

Case Rep Gastrointest Med 2019 14;2019:6053503. Epub 2019 Dec 14.

University of California Irvine Medical Center, Orange, USA.

Intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) and Crohn's disease (CD) very closely resemble each other in symptomatology, imaging, appearance, and pathology. While ITB is rare in the United States, its prevalence is significantly higher in endemic areas, thus presenting a diagnostic dilemma in immigrant populations from high-risk countries. This patient was diagnosed with CD and treated with anti-TNF agents after indeterminate screening for latent tuberculosis. He was then admitted with septic shock and intestinal perforation due to disseminated tuberculosis. This case demonstrates the importance the consideration of ITB when a patient with risk factors for TB fails to respond to treatment for CD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2019/6053503DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6942708PMC
December 2019
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