Publications by authors named "Facundo Rivera-Becerril"

6 Publications

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Pioneer plant species and fungal root endophytes in metal-polluted tailings deposited near human populations and agricultural areas in Northern Mexico.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2021 Jun 14. Epub 2021 Jun 14.

Departamento El Hombre y su Ambiente, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco, Mexico City, Mexico.

As a consequence of industrial mining activity, high volumes of tailings are scattered around Mexico. Frequently, tailings contain heavy metals (HM) which entail threats against all organisms. The aim of this research was to identify plants and root fungal endophytes in polymetallic polluted tailings with the potential to be used in strategies of bioremediation. Four deposits of mine wastes, situated in a semi-arid region near urban and semi-urban populations, and agricultural areas, were studied. The physical and chemical characteristics of substrates, accumulation of HM in plant tissues, root colonization between arbuscular mycorrizal (AMF) and dark septate endophyte (DSE) fungi, and the identification of DSE fungi isolated from the roots of two plant species were studied. Substrates from all four sites exhibited extreme conditions: high levels in sand; low water retention; poor levels in available phosphorus and nitrogen content; and potentially toxic levels of lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and zinc (Zn). The native plants Lupinus campestris, Tagetes lunulata, and Cerdia congestiflora, as well as the exotic Cortaderia selloana and Asphodelus fistulosus, demonstrated a relevant potential role in the phytostabilization and/or phytoextraction of Pb, Cd, and Zn, according to the accumulation of metal in roots and translocation to shoots. Roots of eleven analyzed plant species were differentially co-colonized between AMF and DSE fungi; the presence of arbuscules and microsclerotia suggested an active physiological interaction. Fourteen DSE fungi were isolated from the inner area of roots of T. lunulata and Pennisetum villosum; molecular identification revealed the predominance of Alternaria and other Pleosporales. The use of native DSE fungi could reinforce the establishment of plants for biological reclamation of mine waste in semi-arid climate. Efforts are needed in order to accelerate a vegetation practice of mine wastes under study, which can reduce, in turn, their potential ecotoxicological impact on organisms, human populations, and agricultural areas.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-021-14716-6DOI Listing
June 2021

Impact of a pesticide cocktail (fenhexamid, folpel, deltamethrin) on the abundance of Glomeromycota in two agricultural soils.

Sci Total Environ 2017 Jan 4;577:84-93. Epub 2016 Nov 4.

Agroécologie, AgroSup Dijon, INRA, Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Dijon, France.

Pesticide contamination of the environment can result from agricultural practices. Persistence of pesticide residues is a threat to the soil biota including plant roots and beneficial microorganisms, which support an important number of soil ecosystem services. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are key symbiotic microorganisms contributing to plant nutrition. In the present study, we assessed whether AMF could indicate eventual side effects of pesticides when directly applied to field soils. We evaluated the ecotoxicological impact of a cocktail of three commonly used agricultural pesticides (fenhexamid, folpel, deltamethrin) on the abundance and composition of the AMF community in vineyard (Montagne de Saint-Emilion) and arable (Martincourt) soils subjected to different agricultural practices. The dissipation of applied pesticides was monitored by multiresidual analyses to determine the scenario of exposure of the AMF community. Diversity analysis before application of the pesticide cocktail showed that the AMF communities of vineyard soils, subjected to mechanical weeding or grass cover, and of the arable soil subjected to intensive agriculture, were dominated by Glomerales. Ribotypes specific to each soil and to each agricultural practice in the same soil were found, with the highest abundance and diversity of AMF being observed in the vineyard soil with a grass-cover. The abundance of the global AMF community (Glomeromycota) and of three taxa of AMF (Funneliformis mosseae, Claroideoglomus etunicatum/C. claroideum) was evaluated after pesticide application. The abundance of Glomeromycota decreased in both soils after pesticide application while the abundance of Claroideoglomus and F. mosseae decreased only in the arable soil. These results show that higher doses of pesticide exposure did not affect the global abundance, but altered the composition, of the AMF community. Resilience of the AMF community composition was observed only in the vineyard soil, where F. mosseae was the most tolerant taxon to pesticide exposure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.10.098DOI Listing
January 2017

Fungal diversity and Aspergillus species in hospital environments.

Ann Agric Environ Med 2016 Jun;23(2):264-9

Departamento de Microbiología y Parasitología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Mexico.

Introduction And Objective: Nosocomial invasive fungal infections, particularly aspergillosis, are an increasing problem in immunocompromised patients. The presented study evaluates fungal diversity and the presence of Aspergillus in air samples from two hospitals.

Materials And Methods: Over the course of one year (rainy and dry seasons), the air was sampled from three areas in two hospitals (1 and 2) using a single-stage Andersen viable particle sampler (Thermo Scientific, Waltham, MA, USA). The fungi were identified by macro- and micromorphology, and the number of colony forming units (CFU)/m(3) air and their richness, abundance, and diversity were determined. Isolates Aspergillus genus were characterized by their thermotolerance.

Results: The CFU/m(3) air was similar at both hospitals during the two seasons, but different between the sampled areas. Results showed 10 fungal genera for hospital 1, and 8 for hospital 2. The most abundant were Penicillium, Cladosporium and Aspergillus. The thermotolerance test confirmed the identification of A. fumigatus section Fumigati. The highest growth rate was found in Aspergillus section Nigri.

Conclusion: Determining the fungal diversity in the two hospitals was important because all the species have the potential to be pathogenic, especially the section Fumigati.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5604/12321966.1203888DOI Listing
June 2016

Impacts of manganese mining activity on the environment: interactions among soil, plants, and arbuscular mycorrhiza.

Arch Environ Contam Toxicol 2013 Feb 4;64(2):219-27. Epub 2012 Nov 4.

Departamento El Hombre y su Ambiente, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco, México, DF, Mexico.

The mining district of Molango in the Hidalgo State, Mexico, possesses one of the largest deposits of manganese (Mn) ore in the world. This research assessed the impacts of Mn mining activity on the environment, particularly the interactions among soil, plants, and arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) at a location under the influence of an open Mn mine. Soils and plants from three sites (soil under maize, soil under native vegetation, and mine wastes with some vegetation) were analyzed. Available Mn in both soil types and mine wastes did not reach toxic levels. Samples of the two soil types were similar regarding physical, chemical, and biological properties; mine wastes were characterized by poor physical structure, nutrient deficiencies, and a decreased number of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) spores. Tissues of six plant species accumulated Mn at normal levels. AM was absent in the five plant species (Ambrosia psilostachya, Chenopodium ambrosoides, Cynodon dactylon, Polygonum hydropiperoides, and Wigandia urens) established in mine wastes, which was consistent with the significantly lower number of AMF spores compared with both soil types. A. psilostachya (native vegetation) and Zea mays showed mycorrhizal colonization in their root systems; in the former, AM significantly decreased Mn uptake. The following was concluded: (1) soils, mine wastes, and plant tissues did not accumulate Mn at toxic levels; (2) despite its poor physical structure and nutrient deficiencies, the mine waste site was colonized by at least five plant species; (3) plants growing in both soil types interacted with AMF; and (4) mycorrhizal colonization of A. psilostachya influenced low uptake of Mn by plant tissues.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00244-012-9827-7DOI Listing
February 2013

Molecular changes in Pisum sativum L. roots during arbuscular mycorrhiza buffering of cadmium stress.

Mycorrhiza 2005 Dec 11;16(1):51-60. Epub 2005 Nov 11.

UMR 1088 INRA/5184 CNRS/U., Bourgogne Plante-Microbe-Environnement, INRA-CMSE, BP 86510, 21065, Dijon Cédex, France.

Molecular responses to cadmium (Cd) stress were studied in mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal Pisum sativum L. cv. Frisson inoculated with Glomus intraradices. Biomass decreases caused by the heavy metal were significantly less in mycorrhizal than in non-mycorrhizal plants. Real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction showed that genes implicated in pathways of Cd detoxification varied in response to mycorrhiza development or Cd application. Expression of a metallothionein-encoding gene increased strongly in roots of Cd-treated non-mycorrhizal plants. Genes encoding gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase and glutathione (GSH) synthetase, responsible for the synthesis of the phytochelatin (PC) precursor GSH, were activated by Cd in mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plants. Cd stress decreased accumulation of GSH/homoglutathione (hGSH) and increased thiol groups in pea roots, whether mycorrhizal or not, suggesting synthesis of PCs and/or homophytochelatins. An hGSH synthetase gene, involved in hGSH synthesis, did not respond to Cd alone but was activated by mycorrhizal development in the presence of Cd. Transcript levels of a glutathione reductase gene were only increased in non-mycorrhizal roots treated with Cd. Studies of three stress-related genes showed that a heat-shock protein gene was activated in mycorrhizal roots or by Cd and chitinase gene transcripts increased under Cd stress to a greater extent in mycorrhizal roots, whilst a chalcone isomerase gene was only up-regulated by Cd. Results indicate that although heavy metal chelation pathways contribute to Cd stress responses in pea, they may not make a major contribution to Cd tolerance strategies operating in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00572-005-0016-7DOI Listing
December 2005

Cadmium accumulation and buffering of cadmium-induced stress by arbuscular mycorrhiza in three Pisum sativum L. genotypes.

J Exp Bot 2002 May;53(371):1177-85

UMR 1088 INRA/Université de Bourgogne, BBCE-IPM, INRA-CMSE, BP 86510 21065 Dijon Cédex, France.

The role of arbuscular mycorrhiza in reducing Cd stress was investigated in three genotypes of Pisum sativum L. (cv. Frisson, VIR4788, VIR7128), grown in soil/sand pot cultures in the presence and absence of 2-3 mg kg(-1) bioavailable Cd, and inoculated or not with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices. Shoot, root and pod biomass were decreased by Cd in non-mycorrhizal plants. The presence of mycorrhiza attenuated the negative effect of Cd so that shoot biomass and activity of photosystem II, based on chlorophyll a fluorescence, were not significantly different between mycorrhizal plants growing in the presence or absence of the heavy metal (HM). Total P concentrations were not significantly different between mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plants treated with Cd. From 20-50-fold more Cd accumulated in roots than in shoots of Cd-treated plants, and overall levels were comparable to other metal-accumulating plants. Genetic variability in Cd accumulation existed between the pea genotypes. Concentration of the HM was lowest in roots of VIR4788 and in pods of VIR4788 and VIR7128. G. intraradices inoculation decreased Cd accumulation in roots and pods of cv. Frisson, whilst high concentrations were maintained in roots and pods of mycorrhizal VIR7128. Shoot concentrations of Cd increased in mycorrhizal cv. Frisson and VIR4788. Sequestration of Cd in root cell walls and/or cytoplasm, measured by EDS/SEM, was comparable between non-mycorrhizal pea genotypes but considerably decreased in mycorrhizal cv. Frisson and VIR7128. Possible mechanisms for mycorrhiza buffering of Cd-induced stress in the pea genotypes are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jexbot/53.371.1177DOI Listing
May 2002
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