Publications by authors named "Fabio Rossini"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Status epilepticus admissions during the COVID-19 pandemic in Salzburg-A population-based study.

Epilepsia 2020 12 2;61(12):e198-e203. Epub 2020 Nov 2.

Department of Neurology, Christian Doppler University Hospital, Paracelsus Medical University, Affiliated partner of the ERN EpiCARE, Salzburg, Austria.

Several emergencies were admitted less frequently to the hospital during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. To investigate whether this also occurred with status epilepticus (SE) we compared admissions due to first SE from March to April 2020 ("Time of COVID," TOC) with January to February 2020 ("pre-COVID," preCOV). We also compared admission numbers in TOC and preCOV with the respective 2-month periods in 2018 and 2019 in a retrospective cohort analysis. Two investigators independently searched the hospital patient database for various forms of SE. There was no significant change in the 2-month incidences of first SE in the city of Salzburg from preCOV of 6.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.9-12.3) to TOC of 6.9/100 000 adults (95% CI 3.4-13.3). Admission numbers did not differ significantly from previous years. Estimated adjusted incidence was in line with a recent 5-year epidemiological study in Salzburg. However, a trend toward less-frequent nonconvulsive SE (NCSE) and loss of female predominance were indirect hints of underdiagnosing SE. In contrast to other medical conditions, SE most often presents clinically with impaired consciousness, which may promote admission to emergency departments even in times of lock-down. Further research of medical support of women and patients with NCSE during pandemic-related restrictions is warranted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/epi.16737DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7756208PMC
December 2020

Epileptic seizures of suspected autoimmune origin: a multicentre retrospective study.

J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2020 Nov 28;91(11):1145-1153. Epub 2020 Aug 28.

Department of Neuroscience, Biomedicine and Movement Sciences, Section of Neurology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy

Objective: To analyse autoantibody status in a well-defined European multicentre cohort of patients with epilepsy of unknown aetiology and to validate the recently proposed Antibody Prevalence in Epilepsy (APE2) and Response to ImmunoTherapy in Epilepsy (RITE2) scores.

Methods: We retrospectively collected clinical and paraclinical data of 92 patients referred to the Neurology Units of Verona and Salzburg between January 2014 and July 2019 with new-onset epilepsy, status epilepticus or chronic epilepsy of unknown aetiology. Fixed and live cell-based assays, tissue-based assays, immunoblot, and live rat hippocampal cell cultures were performed in paired serum/cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to detect antineuronal and antiglial antibodies. The APE2 and RITE2 scores were then calculated and compared with clinical and laboratory data.

Results: Autoantibodies were detected in 29/92 patients (31.5%), with multiple positivity observed in 6/29 cases. The APE2 score (median 5, range 1-15) significantly correlated with antibody positivity (p=0.014), especially for the presence of neuropsychiatric symptoms (p<0.01), movement disorders (p<0.01), dysautonomia (p=0.03), faciobrachial dyskinesias (p=0.03) and cancer history (p<0.01). Status epilepticus was significantly more frequent in antibody-negative patients (p<0.01). Among the items of the RITE2 score, early initiation of immunotherapy correlated with a good treatment response (p=0.001), whereas a cancer history was significantly more common among non-responders (p<0.01). Persistence of neuropsychiatric symptoms and seizures correlated with antiepileptic maintenance after at least 1 year.

Conclusions: This is the first study that independently validates the APE2 and RITE2 scores and includes the largest cohort of patients whose paired serum and CSF samples have been tested for autoantibodies possibly associated with autoimmune epilepsy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jnnp-2020-323841DOI Listing
November 2020

Combining SPECT and Quantitative EEG Analysis for the Automated Differential Diagnosis of Disorders with Amnestic Symptoms.

Front Aging Neurosci 2017 7;9:290. Epub 2017 Sep 7.

Department of Neurology, Christian Doppler Medical Centre and Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, Paracelsus Medical University of SalzburgSalzburg, Austria.

Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and Electroencephalography (EEG) have become established tools in routine diagnostics of dementia. We aimed to increase the diagnostic power by combining quantitative markers from SPECT and EEG for differential diagnosis of disorders with amnestic symptoms. We hypothesize that the combination of SPECT with measures of interaction () in the EEG yields higher diagnostic accuracy than the single modalities. We examined 39 patients with Alzheimer's dementia (AD), 69 patients with depressive cognitive impairment (DCI), 71 patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), and 41 patients with amnestic subjective cognitive complaints (aSCC). We calculated 14 measures of interaction from a standard clinical EEG-recording and derived graph-theoretic network measures. From regional brain perfusion measured by 99mTc-hexamethyl-propylene-aminoxime (HMPAO)-SPECT in 46 regions, we calculated relative cerebral perfusion in these patients. Patient groups were classified pairwise with a linear support vector machine. Classification was conducted separately for each biomarker, and then again for each EEG- biomarker combined with SPECT. Combination of SPECT with EEG-biomarkers outperformed single use of SPECT or EEG when classifying aSCC vs. AD (90%), aMCI vs. AD (70%), and AD vs. DCI (100%), while a selection of EEG measures performed best when classifying aSCC vs. aMCI (82%) and aMCI vs. DCI (90%). Only the contrast between aSCC and DCI did not result in above-chance classification accuracy (60%). In general, accuracies were higher when measures of interaction (i.e., connectivity measures) were applied directly than when graph-theoretical measures were derived. We suggest that quantitative analysis of EEG and machine-learning techniques can support differentiating AD, aMCI, aSCC, and DCC, especially when being combined with imaging methods such as SPECT. Quantitative analysis of EEG connectivity could become an integral part for early differential diagnosis of cognitive impairment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnagi.2017.00290DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5594223PMC
September 2017

Resting motor threshold in idiopathic generalized epilepsies: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

Epilepsy Res 2012 Aug 28;101(1-2):3-13. Epub 2012 Apr 28.

Department of Neurological, Neuropsychological, Morphological and Movement Sciences, Section of Clinical Neurology, University of Verona, Italy.

Resting motor threshold (rMT) assessed by means of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is thought to reflect trans-synaptic excitability of cortico-spinal neurons. TMS studies reporting rMT in idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs) yielded discrepant results, so that it is difficult to draw a definitive conclusion on cortico-spinal excitability in IGEs by simple summation of previous results regarding this measure. Our purpose was to carry out a systematic review and a meta-analysis of studies evaluating rMT values obtained during single-pulse TMS in patients with IGEs. Controlled studies measuring rMT by single-pulse TMS in drug-naive patients older than 12 years affected by IGEs were systematically reviewed. rMT values were assessed calculating mean difference and odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Fourteen trials (265 epileptic patients and 424 controls) were included. Patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) have a statistically significant lower rMT compared with controls (mean difference: -6.78; 95% CI -10.55 to -3.00); when considering all subtypes of IGEs and IGEs other than JME no statistically significant differences were found. Overall considered, the results are indicative of a cortico-spinal hyper-excitability in JME, providing not enough evidence for motor hyper-excitability in other subtypes of IGE. The considerable variability across studies probably reflects the presence of relevant clinical and methodological heterogeneity, and higher temporal variability among rMT measurements over time, related to unstable cortical excitability in these patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eplepsyres.2012.03.020DOI Listing
August 2012