Publications by authors named "Fabiana Roberta Segura"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Arsenic volatilization by Aspergillus sp. and Penicillium sp. isolated from rice rhizosphere as a promising eco-safe tool for arsenic mitigation.

J Environ Manage 2019 May 20;237:170-179. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Avenida dos Estados 5001, 09210-580, Santo André, SP, Brazil. Electronic address:

Arsenic (As) is a non-threshold human carcinogenic. This element can be volatilized either by nature or anthropogenic sources. In the present study, the analytical performance of an As volatile species trapping system was evaluated to assess the As volatilization promoted by Penicillium sp. and Aspergillus sp., both isolated from rice rhizosphere, and Aspergillus niger sp. considered as a reference. The study was conducted for 60 days (sampling of volatile As species from 1st to 30 day and from 31st to 60 day). The efficiency of As-volatilization was associated with the fungal growth. The highest As volatilization occurred from 31st to 60 day. Penicillium sp., Aspergillus sp. and A. niger were capable of producing 57.8, 46.4, and 5.2% of volatile arsenic species, respectively. The speciation analysis has shown trimethylarsine (TMAs) as the main volatilized As-form, followed by mono- and dimethylarsine (MMAs and DMAs). The results are following the "Challenger pathway". Therefore, the tested fungi isolated from rice rhizosphere have shown promising properties concerning bio-volatilization with potential use for As-mitigation in paddy soils.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2019.02.060DOI Listing
May 2019

Arsenic speciation in Brazilian rice grains organically and traditionally cultivated: Is there any difference in arsenic content?

Food Res Int 2016 Nov 25;89(Pt 1):169-176. Epub 2016 Jul 25.

Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09090-400 Santo André, SP, Brazil. Electronic address:

Inorganic arsenic contamination in rice is a global public concern due to the risks associated. In spite of being an important issue, few studies concerning differences between inorganic arsenic in rice grains under organic and conventional methods of cultivation are available in Brazil, which is an important producer and consumer. In the present work, samples of polished and husked rice (organic and conventional) and gastronomic rice (Arborio, Carnaroli and red/black rice) were analyzed and the results compared to FAO/Codex maximum limits. The total determination and speciation analysis of arsenic were carried out by ICP-MS and HPLC-ICP-MS, respectively. The results showed no significant statistical differences in total As concentration in organic rice (157.7±56.1ngg) vs. conventional rice (137.4±46.6ngg) and also in organic husked rice (227.7±95.5ngg) vs. conventional husked (217.7±60.9ngg. However, inorganic As was 45% higher in organic polished rice than in conventional polished rice and 41% higher in organic husked rice than in conventional husked rice. Gastronomic rice presented total arsenic ranging from 65.4 to 348ngg for black and Arborio rice, respectively. Regarding the maximum levels adopted by Codex for i-As (200ngg), no violation was found.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodres.2016.07.011DOI Listing
November 2016

Potential risks of the residue from Samarco's mine dam burst (Bento Rodrigues, Brazil).

Environ Pollut 2016 Nov 11;218:813-825. Epub 2016 Aug 11.

Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-170, Santo André, SP, Brazil. Electronic address:

On November 5th, 2015, Samarco's iron mine dam - called Fundão - spilled 50-60 million m of mud into Gualaxo do Norte, a river that belongs to Rio Doce Basin. Approximately 15 km were flooded along the rivers Gualaxo do Norte, Carmo and Doce, reaching the Atlantic Ocean on November 22nd, 2015. Six days after, our group collected mud, soil and water samples in Bento Rodrigues (Minas Gerais, Brazil), which was the first impacted area. Overall, the results, water samples - potable and surface water from river - presented chemical elements concentration according to Brazilian environmental legislations, except silver concentration in surface water that ranged from 1.5 to 1087 μg L. In addition, water mud-containing presented Fe and Mn concentrations approximately 4-fold higher than the maximum limit for water bodies quality assessment, according to Brazilian laws. Mud particle size ranged from 1 to 200 μm. SEM-EDS spot provided us some semi quantitative data. Leaching/extraction tests suggested that Ba, Pb, As, Sr, Fe, Mn and Al have high potential mobilization from mud to water. Low microbial diversity in mud samples compared to background soil samples. Toxicological bioassays (HepG2 and Allium cepa) indicated potential risks of cytotoxicity and DNA damage in mud and soil samples used in both assays. The present study provides preliminary information aiming to collaborate to the development of future works for monitoring and risk assessment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2016.08.005DOI Listing
November 2016

Toxic and essential elements in Nigerian rice and estimation of dietary intake through rice consumption.

Food Addit Contam Part B Surveill 2015 13;8(4):271-6. Epub 2015 Oct 13.

b Department of Clinical Analyses, Toxicology and Food Sciences, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto , University of São Paulo , Ribeirão Preto , Brazil.

In this study, levels and estimated daily intake (EDI) of two toxic elements, Cd and Pb, and eight essential elements: Ca, P, Zn, Mn, Co, Cu, Se and Mo, were determined in Nigerian rice samples. The mean levels of Cd, Pb and Co were 5.43±0.88, 38.66±5.42, 25.8±3.18 ng/g. The mean levels of Ca, P, Zn, Mn, Cu, Se and Mo were 71.5±7.31, 951±52.0, 10.2±0.63, 8.5±0.47, 3.07±0.18, 40.1±9.2 and 0.39±0.05 µg/g, respectively. The percentage contribution to the reference values for each element was 0.54, 7.71, 0.38, 9.51, 8.97, 31.3, 30.7, 5.1 and 60.7% for Cd, Pb, Ca, P, Zn, Mn, Cu, Se and Mo, respectively. The elemental nutrient levels in Nigerian rice samples are comparable to those obtained from other regions and their consumption does not pose any serious health risk to consumers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19393210.2015.1085101DOI Listing
August 2016
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