Publications by authors named "F Matute Teresa"

15 Publications

Large-scale Degradation of the Tocantins-Araguaia River Basin.

Environ Manage 2021 Oct 2;68(4):445-452. Epub 2021 Aug 2.

Researcher, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

The Tocantins-Araguaia Basin is one of the largest river systems in South America, located entirely within Brazilian territory. In the last decades, capital-concentrating activities such as agribusiness, mining, and hydropower promoted extensive changes in land cover, hydrology, and environmental conditions. These changes are jeopardizing the basin's biodiversity and ecosystem services. Threats are escalating as poor environmental policies continue to be formulated, such as environmentally unsustainable hydropower plants, large-scale agriculture for commodity production, and aquaculture with non-native fish. If the current model persists, it will deepen the environmental crisis in the basin, compromising broad conservation goals and social development in the long term. Better policies will require thought and planning to minimize growing threats and ensure the basin's sustainability for future generations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00267-021-01513-7DOI Listing
October 2021

Stream fish metacommunity organisation across a Neotropical ecoregion: The role of environment, anthropogenic impact and dispersal-based processes.

PLoS One 2020 26;15(5):e0233733. Epub 2020 May 26.

Laboratório de Biogeografia e Ecologia Aquática (Bioecol), Universidade Estadual de Goiás, Anápolis, Goiás, Brazil.

Understanding how assemblages are structured in space and the factors promoting their distributions is one of the main goals in Ecology, however, studies regarding the distribution of organisms at larger scales remain biased towards terrestrial groups. We attempt to understand if the structure of stream fish metacommunities across a Neotropical ecoregion (Upper Paraná-drainage area of 820,000 km2) are affected by environmental variables, describing natural environmental gradient, anthropogenic impacts and spatial predictors. For this, we obtained 586 sampling points of fish assemblages in the ecoregion and data on environmental and spatial predictors that potentially affect fish assemblages. We calculated the local beta diversity (Local Contribution to Beta Diversity, LCBD) and alpha diversity from the species list, to be used as response variables in the partial regression models, while the anthropogenic impacts, environmental gradient and spatial factors were used as predictors. We found a high total beta diversity for the ecoregion (0.41) where the greatest values for each site sampled were located at the edges of the ecoregion, while richer communities were found more centrally. All sets of predictors explained the LCBD and alpha diversity, but the most important was dispersal variables, followed by the natural environmental gradient and anthropogenic impact. However, we found an increase in the models' prediction power through the shared effect. Results suggest that environmental filters (i.e. environmental variables such as climate, hydrology and anthropogenic impact) and dispersal limitation together shape fish assemblages of the Upper Paraná ecoregion, showing the importance of using multiple sets of predictors to understand the processes structuring biodiversity distribution.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0233733PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7250414PMC
August 2020

Historical distribution and current drivers of guppy occurrence in Brazil.

J Fish Biol 2020 Apr 27;96(4):877-885. Epub 2020 Feb 27.

Centro de Biologia Marinha, Universidade de São Paulo (CEBIMar-USP), São Sebastião, Brazil.

Humans introduce non-native species by means such as the deliberate release of fish into fresh waters and through commercial trade. The guppy Poecilia reticulata Peters, 1859, is commonly kept in aquaria and controls disease vectors, and now it occurs in many areas outside its natural distribution. Its initial habitat in Brazil was identified, and a study was performed to determine whether the density of guppies can be explained by the density of human population, per-capita gross domestic product, level of human impact on the areas where guppies have been found and fish-sampling effort. A total of 1402 guppy records were found; the southeastern region had the oldest records; and the southeastern, northeastern and central-western regions had the maximum records. Low tolerance to the colder climate may be the reason for the lack of guppy records in the southernmost states. It was also observed that the occurrence of this fish is positively, yet weakly, related to the density of human population, indicating that improved regulations regarding its use in controlling disease vectors, the aquarium trade and education of aquarium hobbyists could help prevent the spread of this species and its potential impacts in Brazil.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jfb.14271DOI Listing
April 2020

and Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Gastric Diseases: Correlation with IL-10 and IL1RN Polymorphism.

J Oncol 2019 6;2019:1785132. Epub 2019 Dec 6.

Department of Health Promotion, Mother and Child Care, Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties "G. D'Alessandro", University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy.

Introduction: and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection have recently been shown to be associated with gastric diseases. Polymorphisms in genes encoding cytokines such as interleukin 10 (IL-10) and interleukin 1 Receptor (IL-1RN) influence cytokine secretion levels and appear to contribute to the risk of developing gastroduodenal diseases. To our knowledge, this is the first preliminary study to address the association of coinfection with and EBV and their correlation with genetic predisposition in the development of gastric diseases.

Methods: Gastric biopsy samples of 96 patients with different gastric diseases were used.

Results: Our results showed that the rate of coinfection was higher in patients with gastric cancer than in patients with normal gastric mucosa, active chronic gastritis, and MALT lymphoma. As regards the characterization of strains, the polymorphism of gene was more frequent in patients with MALT Lymphoma in comparison to others, while the polymorphism was most frequent in patients with normal gastric mucosa. In addition, patients who tested positive for the gene were more frequently those affected with gastric cancer than those with inactive chronic gastritis. Similarly, the patients with gene ON were more frequently those with gastric cancer than those with inactive chronic gastritis.

Conclusion: According to our analysis, there was no correlation between coinfection and polymorphisms in genes encoding IL-10 and IL-1RN. We conclude that various factors can be involved in the development of gastric diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2019/1785132DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6918935PMC
December 2019

High school students' knowledge of endangered fauna in the Brazilian Cerrado: A cross-species and spatial analysis.

PLoS One 2019 25;14(4):e0215959. Epub 2019 Apr 25.

Campus de Ciências Exatas e Tecnológicas (CCET), Universidade Estadual de Goiás, Anápolis, Goiás, Brazil.

The ability of high school students to know endangered species can vary among species (e.g., large body size can influence people's interest) or among municipalities (e.g., more contact with biodiversity can influence people's interest). Thus, in the present paper, we evaluated high school students' knowledge about the endangered and non-endangered mammalian species of the Brazilian Cerrado. We tested whether the recognition of the endangered and non-endangered species varied in a cross-species analysis (twelve total species) according to species characteristics, such as body size, popularity, endangered status and the length of time of inclusion on the endangered species list. Moreover, we tested whether the recognition of the endangered mammal species varied between municipalities (spatial analysis). We interviewed 366 students in their first year of high school in 21 schools (one in each municipality). Our results indicated that the proportion of correctly identified endangered species varied according to species (cross-species). The endangered species that were most often correctly identified were Myrmecophaga tridactyla (known by its popular name, Tamanduá-bandeira, in Brazil), Priodontes maximus (Tatu canastra) and Panthera onca (onça-pintada), with more than 80% correct answers. Thus, students tended to recognize the more popular species and the endangered species more than the non-endangered species. The analysis of student knowledge according to municipality demonstrated that the students' ability to recognize endangered species followed a spatial pattern. Finally, the cross-species and spatial variation patterns detected in the present study indicated the importance of formal education in increasing high school students' knowledge about endangered species and suggested that education should also promote less well-known species, species with smaller body sizes, and other groups of vertebrates and invertebrates and consider local and regional biodiversity whenever possible.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0215959PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6483199PMC
January 2020
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