Publications by authors named "F Klevebro"

40 Publications

Single center consecutive series cohort study of partial stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy for gastric outlet obstruction.

Asian J Surg 2021 Jun 19. Epub 2021 Jun 19.

Department of Upper Abdominal Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital; Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address:

Background/objective: Gastric outlet obstruction can have a large impact on quality of life for patients with upper gastrointestinal cancer or benign obstruction. Partial stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy has previously shown promising outcomes compared to conventional gastrojejunostomy in terms of reduced delayed gastric emptying. The objective of the current study was to present outcomes of partial stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy in a single high-volume center for upper gastrointestinal cancer.

Methods: A retrospective cohort study including all consecutive patients who underwent partial stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy from 2013 to 2020. The primary outcome was oral intake tolerance. A subgroup analysis was performed in all patients with manifest gastric outlet obstruction comparing partial stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy to conventional gastrojejunostomy.

Results: Partial stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy was performed in 32 patients and laparoscopic technique was used in 19 patients (59%). The procedure improved oral intake tolerance defined by gastric outlet obstruction scoring system by 0.63 points on average (P = 0.041). No postoperative complications related to the procedure were observed. Recurrence of gastric outlet obstruction developed in six patients (19%), four patients (13%) required endoscopic reintervention but no patient required surgical reintervention. A comparison between partial stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy and conventional gastrojejunostomy showed no statistically significant differences regarding postoperative nutritional status, length of hospital stay, recurrence or reintervention.

Conclusion: The results of the study show that partial stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy can be an effective surgical treatment for patients suffering from gastric outlet obstruction and that the procedure can be safely performed with laparoscopic technique.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.asjsur.2021.05.047DOI Listing
June 2021

Health-related quality of life following total minimally invasive, hybrid minimally invasive or open oesophagectomy: a population-based cohort study.

Br J Surg 2021 Jun;108(6):702-708

Surgical Care Science, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: Minimally invasive oesophagectomy has been shown to reduce the risk of pulmonary complications compared with open oesophagectomy, but the effects on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and oesophageal cancer survivorship remain unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the longitudinal effects of minimally invasive compared with open oesophagectomy for cancer on HRQoL.

Methods: All patients who had surgery for oesophageal cancer in Sweden from January 2013 to April 2018 were identified. The exposure was total or hybrid minimally invasive oesophagectomy, compared with open surgery. The study outcome was HRQoL, evaluated by means of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer questionnaires QLQ-C30 and QLQ-OG25 at 1 and 2 years after surgery. Mean differences and 95 per cent confidence intervals were adjusted for confounders.

Results: Of the 246 patients recruited, 153 underwent minimally invasive oesophagectomy, of which 75 were hybrid minimally invasive and 78 were total minimally invasive procedures. After adjustment for age, sex, Charlson Co-morbidity Index score, pathological tumour stage and neoadjuvant therapy, there were no clinically and statistically significant differences in overall or disease-specific HRQoL after oesophagectomy between hybrid minimally invasive and total minimally invasive surgical technique versus open surgery.

Conclusion: In this population-based nationwide Swedish study, longitudinal HRQoL after minimally invasive oesophagectomy was similar to that of the open surgical approach.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bjs.11998DOI Listing
June 2021

Patient-reported outcomes after oesophagectomy in the multicentre LASER study.

Br J Surg 2021 May 11. Epub 2021 May 11.

Oesophago-gastric Centre, Churchill Hospital, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

Background: Data on the long-term symptom burden in patients surviving oesophageal cancer surgery are scarce. The aim of this study was to identify the most prevalent symptoms and their interactions with health-related quality of life.

Methods: This was a cross-sectional cohort study of patients who underwent oesophageal cancer surgery in 20 European centres between 2010 and 2016. Patients had to be disease-free for at least 1 year. They were asked to complete a 28-symptom questionnaire at a single time point, at least 1 year after surgery. Principal component analysis was used to assess for clustering and association of symptoms. Risk factors associated with the development of severe symptoms were identified by multivariable logistic regression models.

Results: Of 1081 invited patients, 876 (81.0 per cent) responded. Symptoms in the preceding 6 months associated with previous surgery were experienced by 586 patients (66.9 per cent). The most common severe symptoms included reduced energy or activity tolerance (30.7 per cent), feeling of early fullness after eating (30.0 per cent), tiredness (28.7 per cent), and heartburn/acid or bile regurgitation (19.6 per cent). Clustering analysis showed that symptoms clustered into six domains: lethargy, musculoskeletal pain, dumping, lower gastrointestinal symptoms, regurgitation/reflux, and swallowing/conduit problems; the latter two were the most closely associated. Surgical approach, neoadjuvant therapy, patient age, and sex were factors associated with severe symptoms.

Conclusion: A long-term symptom burden is common after oesophageal cancer surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bjs/znab124DOI Listing
May 2021

Burden of in-hospital care in oesophageal cancer: national population-based study.

BJS Open 2021 May;5(3)

Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

Background: Oesophageal cancer management requires extensive in-hospital care. This cohort study aimed to quantify in-hospital care for patients with oesophageal cancer in relation to intended treatment, and to analyse factors associated with risk of spending a large proportion of survival time in hospital.

Methods: All patients with oesophageal cancer in three nationwide registers over a 10-year period were included. In-hospital care during the first year after diagnosis was evaluated, and the proportion of survival time spent in hospital, stratified by intended treatment (curative, palliative or best supportive care), was calculated. Associations between relevant factors and a greater proportion of survival time in hospital were analysed by multivariable logistic regression.

Results: In-hospital care was provided for a median of 39, 26, and 15 days in the first year after diagnosis of oesophageal cancer in curative, palliative, and best supportive care groups respectively. Patients receiving curatively intended treatment spent a median of 12 per cent of their survival time in hospital during the first year after diagnosis, whereas those receiving palliative or best supportive care spent 19 and 23 per cent respectively. Factors associated with more in-hospital care included older age, female sex, being unmarried, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Conclusion: The burden of in-hospital care during the first year after diagnosis of oesophageal cancer was substantial. Important clinical and socioeconomic factors were identified that predisposed to a greater proportion of survival time spent in hospital.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bjsopen/zrab037DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8103496PMC
May 2021

Long-term variation in skeletal muscle and adiposity in patients undergoing esophagectomy.

Dis Esophagus 2021 Apr 5. Epub 2021 Apr 5.

Department of Thoracic Surgery and Thoracic Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA.

This study seeks to define long-term variation in body composition in patients undergoing esophagectomy for cancer and to associate those changes with survival. Assessment of skeletal muscle, visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) was performed using computed tomography (CT) images routinely acquired: at diagnosis; after neoadjuvant therapy, and; >6 months after esophagectomy. In cases where multiple CT scans were performed >6 months after surgery, all available images were assessed. Ninty-seven patients met inclusion criteria with a median of 2 (range 1-10) postoperative CT images acquired between 0.5 and 9.7 years after surgery. Following surgical treatment of esophageal cancer, patients lost on average 13.3% of their skeletal muscle, 64.5% of their VAT and 44.2% of their SAT. Sarcopenia at diagnosis was not associated with worse overall survival (66.3% vs. 68.5%; P = 0.331). Sarcopenia 1 year after esophagectomy was however associated with lower 5-year overall survival (53.8% vs. 87.5%; P = 0.019). Survival was lower in those patients who had >10% decrease in skeletal muscle index (SMI; 33.3% vs. 72.1%; P = 0.003) and >40% decrease in SAT 1 year after surgery (40.4% vs. 67.4%; P = 0.015). On multivariate analysis, a decline in SMI 1 year after surgery was predictive of worse survival (HR 0.38, 95%CI 0.20-0.73; P = 0.004). This study provides new insight relating to long-term variation in body composition in patients undergoing esophagectomy for cancer. Findings provide further evidence of the importance of body composition, in particular depletion of skeletal muscle, in predicting survival following esophagectomy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/dote/doab016DOI Listing
April 2021
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