Publications by authors named "F Jahanmard"

4 Publications

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Toward Antibacterial Coatings for Personalized Implants.

ACS Biomater Sci Eng 2020 10 10;6(10):5486-5492. Epub 2020 Sep 10.

Department of Orthopedics, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht 3584 CX, The Netherlands.

The complex reconstructive surgeries for which patient-specific orthopedic, maxillofacial, or dental implants are used often necessitate wounds that are open for a considerable amount of time. Unsurprisingly, this allows bacteria to establish implant-associated infection, despite the scrupulous sterilization efforts made during surgery. Here, we developed a prophylactic bactericidal coating via electrophoretic deposition technology for two 3D-printed porous titanium implant designs. The surface characteristics, antibiotic release behavior, antibacterial properties, and impact on osteoblast cell proliferation of the optimized coatings were investigated. The results unequivocally confirmed the biofunctionality of the implants in vitro. This study reveals a new avenue for future antibacterial patient-specific implants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsbiomaterials.0c00683DOI Listing
October 2020

A multifunctional silk coating on additively manufactured porous titanium to prevent implant-associated infection and stimulate bone regeneration.

Biomed Mater 2020 10 3;15(6):065016. Epub 2020 Oct 3.

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah 67156-85420, Iran. Department of Orthopedics, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht 3584 CX, The Netherlands.

Despite tremendous progress in the design and manufacturing of metallic implants, they do not outlive the patient. To illustrate, more than half of hip replacements will fail, mainly due to implant infection and loosening. Surface engineering approaches and, in particular, coatings can facilitate implant bio-functionality via the recruitment of more host cells for new bone formation and inhibition of bacterial colonization. Here, we used electrophoretic deposition to apply a silk fibroin solution consisting of tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and vancomycin as a coating on the surface of additively-manufactured porous titanium. Furthermore, the surface properties of the coatings developed and the release kinetics of the vancomycin were studied to evaluate the applied coating. The in vitro antibacterial behavior of the multifunctional coating, as well as the cell viability and osteogenic differentiation of the MC3T3-E1 cell line were extensively studied. The biomaterials developed exhibited an antibacterial behavior with a reduction of up to four orders of magnitude in both planktonic and adherent bacteria for 6 h and 1 d. A live-dead assay, the Alamar Blue activity, the DNA content, and cytoskeleton staining demonstrated a significant increase in the cell density of the coated groups versus the as-manufactured ones. The significantly enhanced calcium deposition and the increase in mineralization for the groups with TCP after 21 and 28 d, respectively, demonstrate upregulation of the MC3T3 cells' osteogenic differentiation. Our results collectively show that the multifunctional coating studied here can be potentially used to develop a new generation of orthopedic implants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1748-605X/aba40bDOI Listing
October 2020

Bactericidal coating to prevent early and delayed implant-related infections.

J Control Release 2020 10 21;326:38-52. Epub 2020 Jun 21.

Department of Orthopedics, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. Electronic address:

The occurrence of an implant-associated infection (IAI) with the formation of a persisting bacterial biofilm remains a major risk following orthopedic biomaterial implantation. Yet, progress in the fabrication of tunable and durable implant coatings with sufficient bactericidal activity to prevent IAI has been limited. Here, an electrospun composite coating was optimized for the combinatorial and sustained delivery of antibiotics. Antibiotics-laden poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly`1q`(lactic-co glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanofibers were electrospun onto lattice structured titanium (Ti) implants. In order to achieve tunable and independent delivery of vancomycin (Van) and rifampicin (Rif), we investigated the influence of the specific drug-polymer interaction and the nanofiber coating composition on the drug release profile and durability of the polymer-Ti interface. We found that a bi-layered nanofiber structure, produced by electrospinning of an inner layer of [PCL/Van] and an outer layer of [PLGA/Rif], yielded the optimal combinatorial drug release profile. This resulted in markedly enhanced bactericidal activity against planktonic and adherent Staphylococcus aureus for 6 weeks as compared to single drug delivery. Moreover, after 6 weeks, synergistic bacterial killing was observed as a result of sustained Van and Rif release. The application of a nanofiber-filled lattice structure successfully prevented the delamination of the multi-layer coating after press-fit cadaveric bone implantation. This new lattice design, in conjunction with the multi-layer nanofiber structure, can be applied to develop tunable and durable coatings for various metallic implantable devices. This is particularly appealing to tune the release of multiple antimicrobial agents over a period of weeks to prevent early and delayed onset IAI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jconrel.2020.06.014DOI Listing
October 2020

Incorporation of F-MWCNTs into electrospun nanofibers regulates osteogenesis through stiffness and nanotopography.

Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl 2020 Jan 5;106:110163. Epub 2019 Sep 5.

Department of Orthopedics, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584, CX, Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Nanotopography and stiffness are major physical cues affecting cell fate. However, the current nanofiber modifications techniques are limited by their ability to control these two physical cues irrespective of each other without changing the materials' surface chemistry. For this reason, the isolated effects of topography and stiffness on osteogenic regulation in electrospun nanofibers have been studied incompletely. Here, we investigated 1. how functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes (F-MWCNTs) loaded in Polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibers control their physical properties and 2. whether the resulting unique structures lead to distinctive phenotypes in bone progenitor cells. Changes in material properties were measured by high-resolution electron microscopes, protein adsorption and tensile tests. The effect of the developed structures on human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) osteogenic differentiation was determined by extensive quantification of early and late osteogenic marker genes. It was found that F-MWCNT loading was an effective method to independently control the PCL nanofiber surface nanoroughness or stiffness, depending on the applied F-MWCNT concentration. Collectively, this suggests that stiffness and topography activate distinct osteogenic signaling pathway. The current strategy can help our further understanding of the mechano-biological responses in osteoprogenitor cells, which could ultimately lead to improved design of bone substitute biomaterials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.msec.2019.110163DOI Listing
January 2020