Publications by authors named "F J de Ana"

11 Publications

Complications in the Use of Deepithelialized Free Gingival Graft vs. Connective Tissue Graft: A One-Year Randomized Clinical Trial.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 04 23;18(9). Epub 2021 Apr 23.

Departamento de Ciencias Sociosanitarias, Universidad de Sevilla, 41004 Sevilla, Spain.

In the treatment of gingival recession, different surgical options have been described: free gingival grafts (FGG), connective tissue Grafts (CTG), and a more recent technique, de-epithelialized free gingival graft (DFGG). They are not procedures exempt from the appearance of complications. Most publications refer to postoperative complications, and there is limited literature regarding the development of late complications (weeks or months). Our working group carried out a study to describe the development of late complications associated with the use of DFGG in comparison with CTG, providing an incidence rate and a classification. Sixty-eight patients with mucogingival problems were selected, and divided into two groups: the Test Group, for which we used DFGG + Coronal Advancement Flap (CAF), and the Control Group (CTG + CAF). All patients were treated at the University of Seville's dental school to solve mucogingival problems for aesthetic and/or functional reasons. A classification is proposed based on its severity; Major and Minor. Major complications included reepithelialization of the graft, epithelial bands, cul-de-sac, epithelial cysts, and bone exostoses. Minor complications included the graft´s color changes and superficial revascularization. Late major complications were only associated with the use of the DFGG, and the late minor complications developed with the use of the DFGG were much higher than those associated with CTG. CTG appears to be a safer procedure than DFGG in terms of late complications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094504DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8123082PMC
April 2021

Epidermal barrier changes in patients with psoriasis: The role of phototherapy.

Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed 2020 Dec 30. Epub 2020 Dec 30.

Dermatology Department, Hospital Universitario Virgen de las Nieves, Granada, Spain.

Background: Some skin diseases may modify epidermal barrier function. Psoriasis is a chronic multi-systemic inflammatory disease that affects the epidermal barrier. Phototherapy is an option for treating psoriasis, but little is known about how epidermal barrier function is modified by phototherapy in psoriatic patients.

Objectives: (a) To compare skin homeostasis between involved and uninvolved skin in psoriatic patients with healthy controls (b) To evaluate changes in the epidermal barrier function in psoriatic patients treated with phototherapy.

Methods: Sixty patients with plaque-type psoriasis and sixty gender and age-matched healthy controls were enrolled. Temperature, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), stratum corneum hydration (SCH), pH, elasticity, erythema and melanin index were measured using non-invasive tools in the healthy control and involved and uninvolved psoriatic skin before and after phototherapy.

Results: Healthy controls had lower TEWL and erythema index and higher SCH than psoriatic patients, both at uninvolved psoriatic skin and psoriasis plaques. TEWL was higher at psoriasis plaques than at uninvolved skin (19.20 vs 11.57 g/h/m ; P < .001). Following phototherapy, a decreasing trend was observed for TEWL, of 1.03 (SD 0.75) and 0.97 (SD 0.81) g/h/m for uninvolved and involved skin respectively. SCH was significantly lower at psoriatic plaques than at uninvolved skin (7.32 vs 36.62Arbitrary Units [AU]; P < .001). SCH increased by 1.15AU (SD 0.26) on psoriatic plaques after the phototherapy session (P < .001).

Conclusion: Psoriatic plaques showed epidermal barrier dysfunction compared to uninvolved skin and healthy controls. Phototherapy may improve epidermal barrier function in psoriatic patients. SCH increased after a phototherapy session on the psoriatic plaques.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/phpp.12650DOI Listing
December 2020

Mobile applications in oncology: A systematic review of health science databases.

Int J Med Inform 2020 01 19;133:104001. Epub 2019 Oct 19.

Department of Nursing, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain.

Introduction: In recent years there has been an exponential growth in the number of mobile applications (apps) relating to the early diagnosis of cancer and prevention of side effects during cancer treatment. For health care professionals and users, it can thus be difficult to determine the most appropriate app for given needs and assess the level of scientific evidence supporting their use. Therefore, this review aims to examine the research studies that deal with this issue and determine the characteristics of the apps involved.

Methodology: This study involved a systematic review of the scientific literature on randomized clinical trials that use apps to improve cancer management among patients, using the Pubmed (Medline), Latin America and the Caribbean in Health Sciences (LILACS), and Cochrane databases. The search was limited to articles written in English and Spanish published in the last 10 years. A search of the App Store for iOS devices and Google Play for Android devices was performed to find the apps identified in the included research articles.

Results: In total, 54 articles were found to analyze the development of an application in the field of oncology. These articles were most frequently related to the use of apps for the early detection of cancer (n = 28), particularly melanoma (n = 9). In total, 21 studies reflected the application used. The apps featured in nine articles were located using the App Store and Google Play (n = 9), of which five were created to manage cancer-related issues. The rest of the apps were designed for use in the general population (n = 4).

Conclusions: There is an increasing number of research articles that study the use of apps in the field of oncology; however, these mobile applications tend to disappear from app stores after the studies are completed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2019.104001DOI Listing
January 2020

Investigation of rat bone fracture healing using pulsed 1.5 MHz, 30 mW/cm(2) burst ultrasound--axial distance dependency.

Ultrasonics 2014 Mar 1;54(3):850-9. Epub 2013 Nov 1.

Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong, China; Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen, People's Republic of China.

This study investigated the effect of LIPUS on fracture healing when fractures were exposed to ultrasound at three axial distances: z=0 mm, 60 mm, and 130 mm. We applied LIPUS to rat fracture at these three axial distances mimicking the exposure condition of human fractures at different depths under the soft tissue. Measurement of LIPUS shows pressure variations in near field (nearby transducer); uniform profile was found beyond it (far field). We asked whether different positions of the fracture within the ultrasound field cause inconsistent biological effect during the healing process. Closed femoral fractured Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into control, near-field (0mm), mid-near field (60 mm) or far-field (130 mm) groups. Daily LIPUS treatment (plane, but apodized source, see details in the text; 2.2 cm in diameter; 1.5 MHz sine waves repeating at 1 kHz PRF; spatial average temporal average intensity, ISATA=30 mW/cm(2)) was given to fracture site at the three axial distances. Weekly radiographs and endpoint microCT, histomorphometry, and mechanical tests were performed. The results showed that the 130 mm group had the highest tissue mineral density; and significantly higher mechanical properties than control at week 4. The 60 mm and 0 mm groups had significantly higher (i.e. p<0.05) woven bone percentage than control group in radiological, microCT and histomorphometry measurements. In general, LIPUS at far field augmented callus mineralization and mechanical properties; while near field and mid-near field enhanced woven bone formation. Our results indicated the therapeutic effect of LIPUS is dependent on the axial distance of the ultrasound beam. Therefore, the depth of fracture under the soft tissue affects the biological effect of LIPUS. Clinicians have to be aware of the fracture depth when LIPUS is applied transcutaneously.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultras.2013.10.013DOI Listing
March 2014

Value driven innovation in medical device design: a process for balancing stakeholder voices.

Ann Biomed Eng 2013 Sep 13;41(9):1811-21. Epub 2013 Mar 13.

Bioventus LLC, 4721 Emperor Blvd, Suite 100, Durham, NC 27703, USA.

The innovation process has often been represented as a linear process which funnels customer needs through various business and process filters. This method may be appropriate for some consumer products, but in the medical device industry there are some inherent limitations to the traditional innovation funnel approach. In the medical device industry, there are a number of stakeholders who need to have their voices heard throughout the innovation process. Each stakeholder has diverse and unique needs relating to the medical device, the needs of one may highly affect the needs of another, and the relationships between stakeholders may be tenuous. This paper describes the application of a spiral innovation process to the development of a medical device which considers three distinct stakeholder voices: the Voice of the Customer, the Voice of the Business and the Voice of the Technology. The process is presented as a case study focusing on the front-end redesign of a class III medical device for an orthopedics company. Starting from project initiation and scope alignment, the process describes four phases, Discover, Envision, Create, and Refine, and concludes with value assessment of the final design features.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10439-013-0779-5DOI Listing
September 2013