Publications by authors named "Ewelina Pitera"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Role of Promoter Genetic Variants in Chemoresistance and Chemotherapy Induced Neutropenia in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

Int J Mol Sci 2021 Jan 20;22(3). Epub 2021 Jan 20.

Department of Clinical Immunology, Institute of Pediatrics, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 31-663 Kraków, Poland.

Whilst the survival rates of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have increased remarkably over the last decades, the therapy resistance and toxicity are still the major causes of treatment failure. It was shown that overexpression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) promotes proliferation and chemoresistance of cancer cells. In humans, the HO-1 gene () expression is modulated by two polymorphisms in the promoter region: (GT)n-length polymorphism and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) A(-413)T, with short GT repeat sequences and 413-A variants linked to an increased HO-1 inducibility. We found that the short alleles are significantly more frequent in ALL patients in comparison to the control group, and that their presence may be associated with a higher risk of treatment failure, reflecting the role of HO-1 in chemoresistance. We also observed that the presence of short alleles may predispose to develop chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. In case of SNP, the 413-T variant co-segregated with short or long alleles, while 413-A almost selectively co-segregated with long alleles, hence it is not possible to determine if SNPs are actually of phenotypic significance. Our results suggest that HO-1 can be a potential target to overcome the treatment failure in ALL patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms22030988DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7863945PMC
January 2021

The transcriptome-wide association search for genes and genetic variants which associate with BMI and gestational weight gain in women with type 1 diabetes.

Mol Med 2021 01 20;27(1). Epub 2021 Jan 20.

Center for Medical Genomics OMICRON, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland.

Background: Clinical data suggest that BMI and gestational weight gain (GWG) are strongly interconnected phenotypes; however, the genetic basis of the latter is rather unclear. Here we aim to find genes and genetic variants which influence BMI and/or GWG.

Methods: We have genotyped 316 type 1 diabetics using Illumina Infinium Omni Express Exome-8 v1.4 arrays. The GIANT, ARIC and T2D-GENES summary statistics were used for TWAS (performed with PrediXcan) in adipose tissue. Next, the analysis of association of imputed expression with BMI in the general and diabetic cohorts (Analysis 1 and 2) or GWG (Analysis 3 and 4) was performed, followed by variant association analysis (1 Mb around identified loci) with the mentioned phenotypes.

Results: In Analysis 1 we have found 175 BMI associated genes and 19 variants (p < 10) which influenced GWG, with the strongest association for rs11465293 in CCL24 (p = 3.18E-06). Analysis 2, with diabetes included in the model, led to discovery of 1812 BMI associated loci and 207 variants (p < 10) influencing GWG, with the strongest association for rs9690213 in PODXL (p = 9.86E-07). In Analysis 3, among 648 GWG associated loci, 2091 variants were associated with BMI (FDR < 0.05). In Analysis 4, 7 variants in GWG associated loci influenced BMI in the ARIC cohort.

Conclusions: Here, we have shown that loci influencing BMI might have an impact on GWG and GWG associated loci might influence BMI, both in the general and T1DM cohorts. The results suggest that both phenotypes are related to insulin signaling, glucose homeostasis, mitochondrial metabolism, ubiquitinoylation and inflammatory responses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s10020-020-00266-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7818927PMC
January 2021

Decreased Expression of the High Mobility Group Box 1 () Gene in Peripheral Blood in Patients with Mild or Moderate Infection.

Microorganisms 2020 Aug 11;8(8). Epub 2020 Aug 11.

Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 30-688 Krakow, Poland.

Cytokines are mediators of inflammation induced in the course of infection (CDI). High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1) is a cytokine playing an important role in the pathogenesis of numerous inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The aim of the study was to assess the gene expression in the course of CDI. We have performed a prospective case-control study- including 55 adult patients, among them 27 with CDI, who were hospitalized from October 2018 to February 2020 and 28 healthy volunteers. We assessed: a complete blood count with differential leukocyte count, blood creatinine, albumin, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Then, the expression of the gene was evaluated using quantitative Real-Time PCR. Patients with CDI were found to have a significant increase in white blood cells (WBC), neutrophil count, and CRP levels, they also exhibited decreased levels of albumin compared with controls. The gene expression was significantly lower among patients with CDI compared with the control group and significantly, inversely correlated with CRP level in blood. In conclusion, we have observed a decreased expression of the gene in peripheral blood of patients with mild or moderate CDI, which hypothetically could reflect their diminished capability to fight the pathogen.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8081217DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7464922PMC
August 2020

Mitochondrial GWAS and association of nuclear - mitochondrial epistasis with BMI in T1DM patients.

BMC Med Genomics 2020 07 7;13(1):97. Epub 2020 Jul 7.

Center for Medical Genomics OMICRON, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland.

Background: BMI is a strong indicator of complications from type I diabetes, especially under intensive treatment.

Methods: We have genotyped 435 type 1 diabetics using Illumina Infinium Omni Express Exome-8 v1.4 arrays and performed mitoGWAS on BMI. We identified additive interactions between mitochondrial and nuclear variants in genes associated with mitochondrial functioning MitoCarta2.0 and confirmed and refined the results on external cohorts: the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) and GTEx data. Linear mixed model analysis was performed using the GENESIS package in R/Bioconductor.

Results: We find a borderline significant association between the mitochondrial variant rs28357980, localized to MT-ND2, and BMI (β = - 0.69, p = 0.056). This BMI association was confirmed on 1889 patients from FHS cohort (β = - 0.312, p = 0.047). Next, we searched for additive interactions between mitochondrial and nuclear variants. MT-ND2 variants interacted with variants in the genes SIRT3, ATP5B, CYCS, TFB2M and POLRMT. TFB2M is a mitochondrial transcription factor and together with TFAM creates a transcription promoter complex for the mitochondrial polymerase POLRMT. We have found an interaction between rs3021088 in MT-ND2 and rs6701836 in TFB2M leading to BMI decrease (inter_pval = 0.0241), while interaction of rs3021088 in MT-ND2 and rs41542013 in POLRMT led to BMI increase (inter_pval = 0.0004). The influence of these interactions on BMI was confirmed in external cohorts.

Conclusions: Here, we have shown that variants in the mitochondrial genome as well as additive interactions between mitochondrial and nuclear SNPs influence BMI in T1DM and general cohorts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12920-020-00752-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7341625PMC
July 2020

Relations between circulating and myocardial fibrosis-linked microRNAs with left ventricular reverse remodeling in dilated cardiomyopathy.

Adv Clin Exp Med 2020 Mar;29(3):285-293

Department of Cardiac and Vascular Diseases, John Paul II Hospital, Kraków, Poland.

Background: Left ventricular reverse remodeling (LVRR) determines clinical status and outcomes in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The extent of myocardial fibrosis is connected to the systolic function of the heart. The recent discovery of the contribution of microRNAs (miRs) to the regulation of cardiac remodeling, LVRR and fibrosis warrants exploration.

Objectives: The aim of the study was to examine the predictive value of circulating and myocardial miR expression for LVRR in DCM.

Material And Methods: Seventy consecutive DCM patients (age 48 ±12.1 years, 90% male, ejection fraction (EF) 24.4% ±7.4%) were included in the study. At baseline, all patients underwent clinical assessment, echocardiography, venous blood sampling, and right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy. Circulating and myocardial miRs (miR-21, -26, -29, -30, -133a, and -423) were measured with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). LVRR was defined as an increase in EF ≥ 10%, accompanied by a decrease in left ventricle end-diastolic diameter (LVEDd) ≥10% or LVEDd ≤ 33 mm/m2 between baseline and 3-month follow-up.

Results: At the 3-month follow-up, 4 patients had died and 3 patients had incomplete data. The remaining patients were divided according to the presence of LVRR into LVRR-present (n = 32, 51%) and LVRR-absent (n = 31, 49%) groups. Out of all the circulating and tissue miRs under study, only myocardial expression of miR-133a significantly differed between the LVRR-present and LVRR-absent group (1.22 (0.47-1.90) vs 0.61 (0.25-0.99) ΔCq, respectively, p < 0.01). miR-133a was found to be a significant LVRR predictor in unadjusted (odds ratio (OR) = 2.81 (1.23-6.40), p < 0.05) and adjusted for duration of disease, left ventricle end-diastolic (LVED) volume (LVEDvol), hs-troponin-T, and NT-proBNP (OR = 5.20 (1.13-24.050, p < 0.05) models.

Conclusions: From all of the circulating and tissue miRs, only myocardial miR-133a showed increased expression in LVRR-present patients and was found an independent LVRR predictor. This indicates a link between miR-133 and cardiac remodeling in DCM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.17219/acem/115088DOI Listing
March 2020

Epigenetic mechanism in search for the pathomechanism of diabetic neuropathy development in diabetes mellitus type 1 (T1DM).

Endocrine 2020 04 4;68(1):235-240. Epub 2020 Jan 4.

University Hospital in Krakow, Kraków, Poland.

Objective: The aim of this study was to check the hypothesis concerning the crucial role of DNA methylation (one of the epigenetic mechanisms) within selected genes related to the destruction and regeneration of neural cells and its input in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy, using a model of the DNA in peripheral blood cells.

Methods: A cross-sectional, case-control study was conducted, consisting of 24 adult Type 1 Diabetes Melitus (T1DM) patients with autonomic neuropathy (CAN), 25 T1DM patients without neuropathy and 25 matched, healthy adults acting as a control (Ctrl). The Ewing's tests, using the ProSciCard apparatus (Mewicon CATEEM-Tec GmbH), was employed to assess the severity of the patients' symptoms of autonomic neuropathy. For DNA methylation analysis, DNA material of each sample DNA after bisulfite conversion was used for the hybridization of BeadChips (Infinium Methylation EPIC Kit, Illumina), and imaged on the Illumina HiScan. The changes in the expression of selected genes were examined using real-time PCR. Probes were labeled using fluorescein amidite, FAM (Thermo Fisher Scientific). Amplification was performed using the continuous fluorescence detection 7900 HT Fast Real-Time PCR system (Thermo Fisher Scientific). The expression ratio of the target mRNA was normalized to the level of 18s RNA and compared with the control. Statistical analysis was performed using Statistica version 13.1. The statistically significant results were recognized, with a value of p < 0.05.

Results: Clinical analysis of the investigated groups revealed a significantly higher percentage of personal insulin pump users in the group without neuropathy. The glucose metabolic control, based on the HbA1c level analysis, was also significantly better in T1DM patients without CAN. The Bumphunter method for DNA methylation analysis showed statistically significant regions related to the genes involved in nerve regeneration ninjurin 2 (NINJ2) and functionality (BR serine/threonine kinase 2 BRSK2, claudin 4 CLDN4). When compared with T1DM patients without neuropathy, T1DM patients with neuropathy showed significantly increased methylation in the first NINJ2 axon, and a lower level of DNA methylation in the region of the first intron of BRSK2, as well as the CLDN4 5'UTR regions. The qRT-PCR results confirmed the decreased expression of NINJ2 and CLDN4 genes in patients with T1DM with CAN.

Conclusions: The different DNA methylation profiles, correlating with the expression of genes related to nervous tissue development and regeneration in patients with T1DM with autonomic neuropathy provide evidence for the role of epigenetic mechanisms promoting the development of CAN, a chronic complication of T1DM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12020-019-02172-9DOI Listing
April 2020

The relationship between myocardial fibrosis and myocardial microRNAs in dilated cardiomyopathy: A link between mir-133a and cardiovascular events.

J Cell Mol Med 2018 04 29;22(4):2514-2517. Epub 2018 Jan 29.

Department of Cardiac and Vascular Diseases, John Paul II Hospital, Krakow, Poland.

It is unknown whether fibrosis-associated microRNAs: miR-21, miR-26, miR-29, miR-30 and miR-133a are linked to cardiovascular (CV) outcome. The study evaluated the levels of extracellular matrix (ECM) fibrosis and the prevalence of particular microRNAs in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) to investigate any correlation with CV events.

Methods: Seventy DCM patients (48 ± 12 years, EF 24.4 ± 7.4%) underwent right ventricular biopsy. The control group was comprised of 7 patients with CAD who underwent CABG and intraoperative biopsy. MicroRNAs were measured in blood and myocardial tissue via qPCR. The end-point was a combination of CV death and urgent HF hospitalization at the end of 12 months. There were differential levels of circulating and myocardial miR-26 and miR-29 as well as myocardial miR-133a when the DCM and CABG groups were compared. Corresponding circulating and myocardial microRNAs did not correlate with one another. There was no correlation between microRNA and ECM fibrosis. By the end of the 12-month period of the study, CV death had occurred in 6 patients, and a further 19 patients required urgent HF hospitalization. None of the circulating microRNAs was a predictor of the combined end-point; however, myocardial miR-133a was an independent predictor in unadjusted models (HR 1.53; 95% CI 1.14-2.05; P < .004) and adjusted models (HR 1.57; 95% CI 1.14-2.17; P < .005). The best cut-off value for the miR-133a level for the prediction of the combined end-point was 0.74 ΔCq, with an AUC of 0.67. The absence of a correlation between the corresponding circulating and myocardial microRNAs calls into question their cellular source. This study sheds new light on the role of microRNAs in ECM fibrosis in DCM, which warrants further exploration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcmm.13535DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5867126PMC
April 2018