Publications by authors named "Evelien P Mauser-Bunschoten"

18 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Viral hepatitis in haemophilia: historical perspective and current management.

Br J Haematol 2021 May 6. Epub 2021 May 6.

Sheffield Haemophilia and Thrombosis Centre, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK.

The introduction of clotting factor concentrates has substantially improved the lives of people with clotting factor deficiencies. Unfortunately, the transmission of blood-borne viral infections through these plasma-derived products led to a huge epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus and viral hepatitis in people with haemophilia (PWH). In a significant proportion of PWH exposed to these viruses, the ensuing decades-long chronic infection resulted in excess morbidity and mortality. Fortunately, developments in the safety of blood products, as well as vaccination and highly effective antiviral treatments have improved the prospects of PWH. The present article reviews the background of the viral hepatitis epidemic in PWH, the natural history of hepatitis B and C infections and their long-term management.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjh.17438DOI Listing
May 2021

ADAMTS-13 and bleeding phenotype in von Willebrand disease.

Res Pract Thromb Haemost 2020 Nov 31;4(8):1331-1339. Epub 2020 Oct 31.

Department of Hematology Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam Rotterdam The Netherlands.

Background: The bleeding phenotype of von Willebrand disease (VWD) varies highly between patients and can only partly be explained by von Willebrand factor (VWF) parameters. By cleaving large VWF multimers into smaller, less active multimers, ADAMTS-13 is an important regulator of VWF activity. However, it is unknown what the role of ADAMTS-13 is in individuals with VWD.

Objectives: We therefore studied how ADAMTS-13 activity is associated with the laboratory and bleeding phenotype in individuals with VWD.

Methods: We measured ADAMTS-13 activity using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer substrate VWF 73 assay in 638 individuals with VWD in the nationwide cross-sectional Willebrand in the Netherlands study and in 36 healthy controls. The bleeding phenotype was assessed using the Tosetto bleeding score.

Results: ADAMTS-13 activity was similar in individuals with VWD (109% ± 20.6%) and controls (110% ± 19.7%). ADAMTS-13 activity was higher in individuals with VWD with type 3 than those with type 1 (mean difference, 11.8%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.9%-20.8%) or type 2 (mean difference, 16.1%; 95% CI, 7.1%-25.1%). ADAMTS-13 activity was not associated with the Tosetto bleeding score (0.1 Tosetto bleeding score increase per 10% ADAMTS-13 increase, 95% CI, -0.2 to 0.3). Furthermore, ADAMTS-13 activity did not differ between individuals with and without a bleeding event during the year preceding blood sampling (mean difference, 1.4%; 95% CI, -2.1% to 4.9%).

Conclusion: ADAMTS-13 activity was highest in individuals with type 3 VWD, but it had only minor associations with VWF parameters. ADAMTS-13 activity does not influence the bleeding phenotype in individuals with VWD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/rth2.12442DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7695560PMC
November 2020

Mortality, life expectancy, and causes of death of persons with hemophilia in the Netherlands 2001-2018.

J Thromb Haemost 2021 03 18;19(3):645-653. Epub 2020 Dec 18.

Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Background: Treatment of patients with hemophilia has advanced over the past decades, but it is unknown whether this has resulted in a normal life expectancy in the Netherlands.

Objective: This observational cohort study aimed to assess all-cause and cause-specific mortality in patients with hemophilia in the Netherlands between 2001 and 2018 and to compare mortality and life expectancy with previous survival assessments from 1973 onward.

Patients/methods: All 1066 patients with hemophilia who participated in a nationwide survey in 2001 were followed until July 2018.

Results: Information on 1031 individuals (97%) was available, of whom 142 (14%) deceased during follow-up. Compared with the general Dutch male population, mortality of patients with hemophilia was still increased (standardized mortality ratio: 1.4, 95% confidence interval: 1.2-1.7). Intracranial bleeding and malignancies were the most common causes of death. Estimated median life expectancy of patients with hemophilia was 77 years, 6 years lower than the median life expectancy of the general Dutch male population (83 years). Over the past 45 years, death rates of patients with hemophilia have consistently decreased, approaching the survival experience of the general population. Over the past decades, mortality due to human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus infections has decreased, death due to intracranial hemorrhages has increased, and death due to ischemic heart disease has remained consistently low over time.

Conclusions: Survival in patients with hemophilia in the Netherlands has improved over time but is still lower than that of the general population.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jth.15182DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7986360PMC
March 2021

Desmopressin treatment combined with clotting factor VIII concentrates in patients with non-severe haemophilia A: protocol for a multicentre single-armed trial, the DAVID study.

BMJ Open 2019 04 23;9(4):e022719. Epub 2019 Apr 23.

Department of Haematology, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Introduction: Haemophilia A is an inherited bleeding disorder characterised by factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency. In patients with non-severe haemophilia A, surgery and bleeding are the main indications for treatment with FVIII concentrate. A recent study reported that standard dosing frequently results in FVIII levels (FVIII:C) below or above FVIII target ranges, leading to respectively a bleeding risk or excessive costs. In addition, FVIII concentrate treatment carries a risk of development of neutralising antibodies. An alternative is desmopressin, which releases endogenous FVIII and von Willebrand factor. In most patients with non-severe haemophilia A, desmopressin alone is not enough to achieve FVIII target levels during surgery or bleeding. We hypothesise that combined pharmacokinetic (PK)-guided administration of desmopressin and FVIII concentrate may improve dosing accuracy and reduces FVIII concentrate consumption.

Methods And Analysis: In the DAVID study, 50 patients with non-severe haemophilia A (FVIII:C ≥0.01 IU/mL) with a bleeding episode or undergoing surgery will receive desmopressin and FVIII concentrate combination treatment. The necessary dose of FVIII concentrate to reach FVIII target levels after desmopressin administration will be calculated with a population PK model. The primary endpoint is the proportion of patients reaching FVIII target levels during the first 72 hours after start of the combination treatment. This approach was successfully tested in one pilot patient who received perioperative combination treatment.

Ethics And Dissemination: The DAVID study was approved by the medical ethics committee of the Erasmus MC. Results of the study will be communicated trough publication in international scientific journals and presentation at (inter)national conferences.

Trial Registration Number: NTR5383; Pre-results.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2018-022719DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6500101PMC
April 2019

Antifibrinolytic therapy for preventing oral bleeding in patients with haemophilia or Von Willebrand disease undergoing minor oral surgery or dental extractions.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2019 04 19;4:CD011385. Epub 2019 Apr 19.

Van Creveldkliniek / Department of Haematology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht, Netherlands, 3584CT.

Background: Minor oral surgery or dental extractions (oral or dental procedures) are widely performed and can be complicated by hazardous oral bleeding, especially in people with an inherited bleeding disorder such as haemophilia or Von Willebrand disease (VWD). The amount and severity of singular bleedings depend on disease-related factors, such as the severity of the haemophilia, both local and systemic patient factors (such as periodontal inflammation, vasculopathy or platelet dysfunction) and intervention-related factors (such as the type and number of teeth extracted or the dimension of the wound surface). Similar to local haemostatic measures and suturing, antifibrinolytic therapy is a cheap, safe and potentially effective treatment to prevent bleeding complications in individuals with bleeding disorders undergoing oral or dental procedures. However, a systematic review of trials reporting outcomes after oral surgery or a dental procedure in people with an inherited bleeding disorder, with or without, the use of antifibrinolytic agents has not been performed to date. This is an update of a previously published Cochrane Review.

Objectives: Primarily, we aim to assess the efficacy of antifibrinolytic agents to prevent bleeding complications in people with haemophilia or VWD undergoing oral or dental procedures.Secondary objectives are to assess if antifibrinolytic agents can replace or reduce the need for clotting factor concentrate therapy in people with haemophilia or VWD and to establish the effects of these agents on bleeding in oral or dental procedures for each of these patient populations.

Search Methods: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Coagulopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), of MEDLINE and from handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We additionally searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews. We searched PubMed, Embase, Cinahl and the Cochrane Library. Additional searches were performed in ClinicalTrials.gov, WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP).Date of last search of the Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Coagulopathies Trials Register: 01 March 2019.

Selection Criteria: Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials in people with haemophilia or VWD undergoing oral or dental procedures using antifibrinolytic agents (tranexamic acid or epsilon aminocaproic acid (EACA)) to prevent perioperative bleeding compared to no intervention or usual care with or without placebo.

Data Collection And Analysis: Two authors independently screened the titles and abstracts of all identified articles. Full texts were obtained for potentially relevant abstracts and two authors independently assessed these for inclusion based on the selection criteria. A third author verified trial eligibility. Two authors independently performed data extraction and risk of bias assessments using standardised forms.

Main Results: While there were no eligible trials in people with VWD identified, two randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials (total of 59 participants) in people with haemophilia undergoing dental extraction were included. One trial of tranexamic acid published in 1972 included 28 participants with mild, moderate or severe haemophilia A and B and one of EACA published in 1971 included 31 people with haemophilia with factor VIII or factor IX levels less than 15%. Overall, the two included trials showed a beneficial effect of tranexamic acid and EACA, administered systemically, in reducing the number of bleedings, the amount of blood loss and the need for therapeutic clotting factor concentrates. Regarding postoperative bleeding, the tranexamic acid trial showed a risk difference (RD) of -0.64 (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.93 to - 0.36) and the EACA trial a RD of -0.50 (95% CI 0.77 to -0.22). The combined RD of both trials was -0.57 (95% CI -0.76 to -0.37), with the quality of the evidence (GRADE) for this outcome is rated as moderate. Side effects occurred once and required stopping EACA (combined RD of -0.03 (95% CI -0.08 to 0.13). There was heterogeneity between the two trials regarding the proportion of people with severe haemophilia included, the concomitant standard therapy and fibrinolytic agent treatment regimens used. We cannot exclude that a selection bias has occurred in the EACA trial, but overall the risk of bias appeared to be low for both trials.

Authors' Conclusions: Despite the discovery of a beneficial effect of systemically administered tranexamic acid and EACA in preventing postoperative bleeding in people with haemophilia undergoing dental extraction, the limited number of randomised controlled trials identified, in combination with the small sample sizes and heterogeneity regarding standard therapy and treatment regimens between the two trials, do not allow us to conclude definite efficacy of antifibrinolytic therapy in oral or dental procedures in people with haemophilia. No trials were identified in people with VWD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD011385.pub3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6474399PMC
April 2019

Antifibrinolytic therapy for preventing oral bleeding in people on anticoagulants undergoing minor oral surgery or dental extractions.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2018 07 2;7:CD012293. Epub 2018 Jul 2.

University Medical Centre Utrecht, Poortstraat 95, Utrecht, Netherlands, 3572HG.

Background: Individuals on continuous treatment with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) or direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are at increased risk of bleeding complications during and after oral or dental procedures. Anticoagulant treatment is preferably continued at the same dose, since dose reduction or discontinuation of treatment is associated with an increased risk of thromboembolism. The use of haemostatic measures during or after the procedure (or both) could enable continuation of the oral anticoagulant treatment.

Objectives: We aimed to assess the efficacy of antifibrinolytic agents for preventing bleeding complications in people on oral anticoagulants undergoing minor oral surgery or dental extractions.

Search Methods: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Coagulopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews. We searched PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library. Additional searches were performed using ClinicalTrials.gov, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), the CINAHL database of nursing and allied health services, the open access ProQuest dissertation database, papers and reports from the American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) and abstract books from annual scientific conferences.Date of last search: 04 January 2018.

Selection Criteria: Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials in people on continuous treatment with VKAs or DOACs undergoing oral or dental procedures using antifibrinolytic agents (tranexamic acid (TXA) or epsilon aminocaproic acid) to prevent perioperative bleeding compared to no intervention or usual care with or without placebo.

Data Collection And Analysis: Two authors independently screened the titles and abstracts of all identified articles. Full texts were obtained from potentially relevant abstracts and two authors independently assessed these for inclusion based of the selection criteria. A third author verified trial eligibility. Two authors independently performed data extraction and risk of bias assessments using standardized forms. The quality of the evidence was assessed using GRADE.

Main Results: No eligible trials in people on continuous treatment with DOACs undergoing oral or dental procedures were identified.Three randomised trials and one quasi-randomised trial (follow-up in all was seven days) in people on continuous treatment with VKAs were included with a total of 253 participants (mean age 60 years). Two trials published in 1989 and 1993 compared the antifibrinolytic agent TXA with placebo in people using VKAs. Two other trials were published in 1999 and 2015 and compared TXA with gelatin sponge and sutures, and dry gauze compression, respectively. In all included trials, those who were treated with VKAs had international normalised ratio (INR) values within the therapeutic range and TXA was applied locally, not systemically.The two trials from 1989 and 1993 comparing TXA with placebo showed a statistically significant beneficial effect regarding the number of major postoperative bleeding episodes requiring intervention, with a pooled risk difference (RD) of -0.25 (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.36 to -0.14) (128 participants) (moderate-quality evidence). For the two trials that compared TXA with either gelatin sponge and sutures or with dry gauze compression, there was no difference between the TXA and the standard care group, RD 0.02 (95% CI -0.07 to 0.11) (125 participants) (moderate-quality evidence). The combined RD of all included trials was -0.13 (95% CI -0.30 to 0.05) (moderate-quality evidence). There were no side effects of antifibrinolytic therapy that required treatment withdrawal (128 participants) (moderate-quality evidence). Despite heterogeneity between trials with respect to the different haemostatic measures used in the control groups, the trials were comparable regarding design and baseline participant characteristics.Overall, we considered the risk of bias to be low in the trials comparing TXA with placebo and moderate in the trials comparing TXA with alternative haemostatic measures.

Authors' Conclusions: Based on the results of this Cochrane Review, there seems to be a beneficial effect of locally applied TXA in preventing oral bleeding in people on continuous treatment with VKAs undergoing minor oral surgery or dental extractions. However, the small number of identified randomised controlled trials, the relatively small number of participants included in the trials and the differences in standard therapy and treatment regimens between trials, do not allow us to conclude definite efficacy of antifibrinolytic therapy in this population.We were unable to identify any eligible trials in people on continuous treatment with DOACs undergoing oral or dental procedures. Therefore, a beneficial effect of antifibrinolytic therapy can currently only be assumed based on data from the people using VKAs.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD012293.pub2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6513563PMC
July 2018

Circulating Angiogenic Mediators in Patients with Moderate and Severe von Willebrand Disease: A Multicentre Cross-Sectional Study.

Thromb Haemost 2018 01 5;118(1):152-160. Epub 2018 Jan 5.

Department of Hematology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Inhibition of von Willebrand factor (VWF) expression in endothelial cells results in enhanced, possible dysfunctional angiogenesis, consistent with observations of severe gastrointestinal bleedings caused by vascular malformations in patients with von Willebrand disease (VWD). VWF is stored in endothelial Weibel-Palade bodies (WPB) with several other mediators of angiogenesis, like angiopoietin-2, osteoprotegerin and galectin-3. Increased release of angiopoietin-2 has been observed in medium of endothelial cells lacking VWF, but data on circulating levels of angiogenic factors in patients with VWD are lacking. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate plasma levels of angiogenic factors in patients with various types of VWD to obtain more insight into the pathogenesis of vascular malformations in these patients. We hypothesized that VWF deficiency leads to increased circulating levels of other WPB components. We therefore measured plasma levels of the WPB components angiopoietin-2, osteoprotegerin and galectin-3 as well as two other angiogenic factors (angiopoietin-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF]) that are not stored within WPB. We observed that various angiogenic mediators are significantly different between types of VWD patients. Type 2A VWD patients had higher angiopoietin-1 levels compared with type 2B patients. Patients who have increased VWF clearance had higher angiopoietin-2 levels, whereas patients who have impaired VWF synthesis had higher galectin-3 levels. VEGF levels were negatively associated with VWF levels as type 3 VWD patients had the highest VEGF levels. However, complete VWF deficiency did not lead to increased circulating levels of other WPB components.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1160/TH17-06-0397DOI Listing
January 2018

Management of cardiovascular disease in aging persons with haemophilia.

Hamostaseologie 2017 Aug 14;37(3):196-201. Epub 2016 Dec 14.

Roger E. G. Schutgens, MD, PhD, MSc, Van Creveldkliniek, UMC Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100 3584CX Utrecht, The Netherlands, Tel: +31 88 7558450,

With the aging of the haemophilia population, age related comorbidities become more and more a medical issue. Managing haemophilia patients with cardiovascular disease is a difficult task for many haemophilia-treating physicians. Over the years, insights on prevalence, risk factors and management of cardiovascular disease in haemophilia have improved substantially. It is now recognised that many risk factors, such as hypertension and overweight, occur quite frequently in patients with haemophilia. Several new insights in anticoagulation management of atrial fibrillation and coronary ischaemia in haemophilia have been suggested. This review provides an general overview of the current knowledge of these topics in literature.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5482/HAMO-16-09-0037DOI Listing
August 2017

Nonacog beta pegol (N9-GP) in haemophilia B: A multinational phase III safety and efficacy extension trial (paradigm™4).

Thromb Res 2016 May 2;141:69-76. Epub 2016 Mar 2.

Haemophilia Center, National Blood Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Introduction: Paradigm™4 was an international extension trial investigating the safety and efficacy of nonacog beta pegol, a recombinant glycoPEGylated factor IX (FIX) with extended half-life, in haemophilia B patients (FIX activity ≤2%; aged 13-70years) who had previously participated in phase III pivotal (paradigm™2) or surgery (paradigm™3) trials.

Methods: Patients chose to continue treatment with nonacog beta pegol in either one of two once-weekly prophylaxis arms (10IU/kg or 40IU/kg), or an on-demand arm (40IU/kg for mild/moderate bleeds; 80IU/kg for severe bleeds). The primary objective was to evaluate immunogenicity; key secondary objectives included assessing safety and haemostatic efficacy in the treatment and prevention of bleeds.

Results: Seventy-one patients received prophylaxis or on-demand treatment. No patient developed an inhibitor and no safety concerns were identified. The success rate for the treatment of reported bleeds was 94.6%; most (87.9%) resolved with one injection. The median annualised bleeding rate for patients on prophylaxis was 1.36 (interquartile range [IQR] 0.00-2.23) and 1.00 (IQR 0.00-2.03) for the 10 and 40IU/kg treatment arms, respectively. The mean FIX activity trough achieved for 10 and 40IU once weekly was 9.8% and 21.3%, respectively. Fourteen patients on prophylaxis underwent 23 minor surgical procedures; haemostatic perioperative outcomes for all of those evaluated were 'excellent' or 'good'.

Conclusions: Nonacog beta pegol showed a favourable tolerability profile (with no safety issues identified) with good prophylactic protection and control of bleeding in previously treated adult and adolescent haemophilia B patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.thromres.2016.02.030DOI Listing
May 2016

Discontinuing early prophylaxis in severe haemophilia leads to deterioration of joint status despite low bleeding rates.

Thromb Haemost 2016 05 21;115(5):931-8. Epub 2016 Jan 21.

Kathelijn Fischer, MD, PhD, Van Creveldkliniek, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Postzone C01.425, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht, The Netherlands, Tel.: +31 88 755 8450, Fax: +31 88 755 5438, E-mail:

Prophylaxis is the recommended treatment for children with severe haemophilia A, but whether prophylaxis should be continued in adulthood is still under debate. Previous studies with limited follow-up have suggested that some patients may be able to stop prophylaxis in adulthood, while maintaining good joint health. This single-centre observational cohort study examined patients with severe haemophilia A born 1970-1988 without inhibitor development, and assessed the long-term consequences of discontinuing prophylaxis. Patient-initiated changes in prophylaxis, including all switches to on-demand treatment lasting a minimum of two consecutive weeks, were recorded from the time self-infusion began until the last evaluation. Sixty-six patients were evaluated at a median age of 32.4 years: 26 % of patients had stopped prophylaxis for a median of 10 years, 15 % had interrupted prophylaxis and 59 % had continued prophylaxis. Annual joint bleeding rate (AJBR), Haemophilia Joint Health Score (HJHS-2.1; 0-124 points), radiological Pettersson score (0-78 points) and Haemophilia Activities List score (HAL; 100-0 points) were compared between patients who stopped and patients who continued prophylaxis. Although self-reported bleeding rates and functional limitations were similar in both groups (AJBR: 1.5 vs 1.2 and HAL: 84 vs 84 for those who stopped and continued prophylaxis, respectively), objective assessment of joint status showed increased arthropathy after 10 years of on-demand treatment in patients who stopped prophylaxis compared with those who continued (HJHS: 23 vs. 14 and Pettersson: 16 vs 5, respectively; P< 0.01). These results support continuation of long-term prophylaxis in adults and demonstrate the need for objective monitoring of joint status.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1160/TH15-08-0637DOI Listing
May 2016

Antifibrinolytic therapy for preventing oral bleeding in patients with haemophilia or Von Willebrand disease undergoing minor oral surgery or dental extractions.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2015 Dec 24(12):CD011385. Epub 2015 Dec 24.

Van Creveldkliniek / Department of Haematology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht, Netherlands, 3584CT.

Background: Minor oral surgery or dental extractions (oral or dental procedures) are widely performed and can be complicated by hazardous oral bleeding, especially in people with an inherited bleeding disorder such as haemophilia or Von Willebrand disease. The amount and severity of singular bleedings depend on disease-related factors, such as the severity of the haemophilia, both local and systemic patient factors (such as periodontal inflammation, vasculopathy or platelet dysfunction) and intervention-related factors (such as the type and number of teeth extracted or the dimension of the wound surface). Similar to local haemostatic measures and suturing, antifibrinolytic therapy is a cheap, safe and potentially effective treatment to prevent bleeding complications in individuals with bleeding disorders undergoing oral or dental procedures. However, a systematic review of trials reporting outcomes after oral surgery or a dental procedure in people with an inherited bleeding disorder, with or without, the use of antifibrinolytic agents has not been performed to date.

Objectives: The primary objective was to assess the efficacy of local or systemic use of antifibrinolytic agents to prevent bleeding complications in people with haemophilia or Von Willebrand disease undergoing oral or dental procedures. Secondary objectives were to assess if antifibrinolytic agents can replace or reduce the need for clotting factor concentrate therapy in people with haemophilia or Von Willebrand disease and to further establish the effects of these agents on bleeding in oral or dental procedures for each of these populations.

Search Methods: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Coagulopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), of MEDLINE and from handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We additionally searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews. We searched PubMed, Embase and The Cochrane Library. Additional searches were performed in ClinicalTrials.gov, WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP).Date of last search of the Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Coagulopathies Trials Register: 14 December 2015.

Selection Criteria: Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials in people with haemophilia or Von Willebrand disease undergoing oral or dental procedures using antifibrinolytic agents (tranexamic acid or epsilon aminocaproic acid) to prevent perioperative bleeding compared to no intervention or usual care with or without placebo.

Data Collection And Analysis: Two authors independently screened the titles and abstracts of all identified articles. Full texts were obtained for potentially relevant abstracts and two authors independently assessed these for inclusion based on the selection criteria. A third author verified trial eligibility. Two authors independently performed data extraction and risk of bias assessments using standardized forms.

Main Results: While there were no eligible trials in people with Von Willebrand disease identified, two randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials (total of 59 participants) in people with haemophilia undergoing dental extraction were included. One trial of tranexamic acid published in 1972 included 28 participants with mild, moderate or severe haemophilia A and B and one of epsilon aminocaproic acid published in 1971 included 31 people with haemophilia with factor VIII or factor IX levels less than 15%. Overall, the two included trials showed a beneficial effect of tranexamic acid and EACA, administered systemically, in reducing the number of bleedings, the amount of blood loss and the need for therapeutic clotting factor concentrates. Regarding postoperative bleeding, the tranexamic acid trial showed a risk difference of -0.64 (95% confidence interval -0.93 to - 0.36) and the EACA trial a risk difference of -0.50 (95% confidence interval 0.77 to -0.22). The combined risk difference of both trials was -0.57 (95% confidence interval -0.76 to -0.37), with the quality of the evidence (GRADE) for this outcome is rated as moderate. Side effects occurred once and required stopping epsilon aminocaproic acid (combined risk difference of -0.03 (95% CI -0.08 to 0.13). There was heterogeneity between the two trials regarding the proportion of people with severe haemophilia included, the concomitant standard therapy and fibrinolytic agent treatment regimens used. We cannot exclude that a selection bias has occurred in the epsilon aminocaproic acid trial, but overall the risk of bias appeared to be low for both trials.

Authors' Conclusions: Despite the discovery of a beneficial effect of systemically administered tranexamic acid and epsilon aminocaproic acid in preventing postoperative bleeding in people with haemophilia undergoing dental extraction, the limited number of randomised controlled trials identified, in combination with the small sample sizes and heterogeneity regarding standard therapy and treatment regimens between the two trials, do not allow us to conclude definite efficacy of antifibrinolytic therapy in oral or dental procedures in people with haemophilia. No trials were identified in people with Von Willebrand disease.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD011385.pub2DOI Listing
December 2015

Bleeding spectrum in children with moderate or severe von Willebrand disease: Relevance of pediatric-specific bleeding.

Am J Hematol 2015 Dec 17;90(12):1142-8. Epub 2015 Nov 17.

Department of Hematology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

The bleeding phenotype of children with von Willebrand disease (VWD) needs to be characterized in detail to facilitate diagnosis during childhood and aid in the planning and assessment of treatment strategies. The objective was to evaluate the occurrence, type, and severity of bleeding in a large cohort of children with moderate and severe VWD. We included 113 children (aged 0-16 years) with Type 1 (n = 60), 2 (n = 44), and 3 (n = 9) VWD with von Willebrand factor (VWF) antigen and/or VWF ristocetin cofactor levels ≤ 30 U/dL from a nation-wide cross-sectional study ("Willebrand in the Netherlands" study). Bleeding severity and frequency were determined using the International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis-Bleeding Assessment Tool (ISTH-BAT) with supplementary pediatric-specific bleeding symptoms (umbilical stump bleeding, cephalohematoma, cheek hematoma, conjunctival bleeding, postcircumcision and postvenipuncture bleeding). We found that all 26 postmenarche girls experienced menorrhagia. Other common bleedings were cutaneous (81%), oropharyngeal (64%), prolonged bleeding from minor wounds (58%), and epistaxis (56%). Pediatric-specific bleeding symptoms were present in 44% of patients. ISTH-BAT bleeding score was higher in index cases than in affected family members (median, 12.0 vs. 6.5, P < 0.001), higher in Type 3 VWD than in Type 2 or 1 (17.0 vs. 10.5 or 6.5, P < 0.001) and higher in children with severe (<10 U/dL) than moderate VWD (10-30 U/dL) (11.0 vs. 7.0, P < 0.001). Frequency of any bleeding, epistaxis, and oral cavity was higher in types 2 and 3 than in Type 1 VWD and was associated with VWF levels. We conclude that pediatric-specific bleeding symptoms occurred in a large proportion of children with moderate or severe VWD and should be included when evaluating children for VWD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajh.24195DOI Listing
December 2015

[Von Willebrand disease in the Netherlands: the WiN study].

Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd 2014 ;158:A6518

Mede namens de landelijke WiN-studie-werkgroep.

Von Willebrand disease is the most common inherited bleeding disorder and is characterised by mucocutaneous bleeding. Von Willebrand disease is caused by reduced levels or reduced function of von Willebrand factor. Depending on the cause, von Willebrand disease is distinguished into various types with their own characteristics and treatment options. The frequency and severity of bleeding in patients with von Willebrand disease is strongly determined by von Willebrand factor levels, factor VIII levels and the type of von Willebrand disease. Eighty-five percent of all adult females with von Willebrand disease reports menorrhagia. A high percentage have postpartum excessive blood loss (37% of all deliveries). The quality of life is reduced in patients with von Willebrand disease. Patients with von Willebrand disease have a reduced risk of arterial thrombosis such as a myocardial or cerebral infarction.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 2014

Inhibitor incidence after intensive FVIII replacement for surgery in mild and moderate haemophilia A: a prospective national study in the Netherlands.

Br J Haematol 2012 Jun 26;157(6):747-52. Epub 2012 Apr 26.

Department of Paediatric Haematology, Emma Children's Hospital, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Inhibitor development is currently the most severe complication in mild/moderate haemophilia A patients, causing increased bleeding tendency, hospitalization and mortality. It has been suggested that receiving high doses of factor VIII (FVIII) concentrates for surgical procedures is an important risk factor for inhibitor development in these patients. The current multicentre study aimed to determine prospectively the incidence of inhibitor development after intensive FVIII replacement therapy for surgical procedures in patients with mild/moderate haemophilia A. All consecutive patients with mild/moderate haemophilia A were included when they required at least 10 000 iu of FVIII concentrates (or 250 iu/kg) for 5 or more days for a surgical procedure. Potential clinical risk factors for inhibitor development and results of inhibitor tests were collected. Forty-six patients with a median age of 54 years (interquartile range, 40-59 years) were included in the study. F8 genotyping revealed 20 different missense mutations. Patients received either recombinant (65%) or plasma-derived FVIII concentrates (35%) by intermittent bolus injections (41%) or continuous infusion (57%). Two patients developed a low titre inhibitor post-operatively. The incidence of inhibitor development following intensive treatment for surgery in this unselected prospective cohort of mild/moderate haemophilia A patients was 4% (95% confidence interval, 0·5-14·8).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2141.2012.09119.xDOI Listing
June 2012

How I treat age-related morbidities in elderly persons with hemophilia.

Blood 2009 Dec 16;114(26):5256-63. Epub 2009 Oct 16.

Angelo Bianchi Bonomi Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center, Department of Medicine and Medical Specialties, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Maggiore Hospital, Mangiagalli and Regina Elena Foundation, Milan, Italy.

In persons with hemophilia, life expectancy is now approaching that of the general male population, at least in countries that can afford regular replacement therapy with coagulation factor concentrates. The new challenges for comprehensive treatment centers are thus to provide optimal health care for this aging population of patients, who often present not only with the comorbidities typically associated with hemophilia (arthropathy, chronic pain, blood-borne infections), but also with common age-related illnesses such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. There are no evidence-based guidelines for the management of these conditions, which often require drugs that interfere with hemostasis, enhance the bleeding tendency, and warrant more intensive replacement therapy. At the moment, elderly patients with hemophilia affected by other diseases should be managed like their age-group peers without hemophilia, provided replacement therapy is tailored to the heightened risk of bleeding associated with the need for invasive procedures and drugs that further compromise the deranged hemostasis. More detailed advice is provided on the schedules of replacement therapy needed to tackle cardiovascular diseases, such as acute coronary syndromes and nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, because these conditions will become more and more frequent challenges for the comprehensive treatment centers.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2009-07-215665DOI Listing
December 2009

IgG subclasses of anti-FVIII antibodies during immune tolerance induction in patients with hemophilia A.

Br J Haematol 2008 Aug 28;142(4):644-52. Epub 2008 May 28.

Department of Plasma Proteins, Van Creveld Laboratorium and Landsteiner Laboratorium of the AMC at Sanquin Research, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

The eradication of inhibitory antibodies in patients with haemophilia A can be accomplished by frequent administration of high or intermediate doses of factor VIII (FVIII), so-called immune tolerance induction (ITI). This study monitored the distribution of IgG subclasses of anti-FVIII antibodies during ITI. FVIII-specific antibodies of subclass IgG1 were detected in all inhibitor patients tested, anti-FVIII IgG4 in 16, IgG2 in 10 and IgG3 in one of 20 patients analysed. Levels of anti-FVIII IgG1 and IgG4 correlated well with inhibitor titres as measured by Bethesda assay. In low-titre inhibitor patients, anti-FVIII antibodies consisted primarily of subclass IgG1 whereas, anti-FVIII antibodies of subclass IgG4 were more prominent in patients with high titre inhibitors who needed prolonged treatment or who failed ITI. Longitudinal analysis of 14 patients undergoing ITI revealed that the relative contribution of IgG subclasses was constant for most of the patients analysed. In two patients, the relative contribution of IgG4 increased during ITI. Overall, our findings document the distribution and dynamics of anti-FVIII IgG subclasses during ITI. Future studies will need to address whether monitoring the relative contribution of anti-FVIII subclasses IgG1 and IgG4 may be useful for the identification of patients who are at risk of failing ITI.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2141.2008.07232.xDOI Listing
August 2008

Thirty years of hemophilia treatment in the Netherlands, 1972-2001.

Blood 2004 Dec 12;104(12):3494-500. Epub 2004 Aug 12.

Leiden University Medical Center, Clinical Epidemiology and the Thrombosis and Hemostasis Research Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Since the introduction of replacement therapy in the early 1960s by the infusion of plasma-derived factor VIII and IX preparations, important changes have occurred for hemophilia patients. We studied the medical and social developments over 30 years of hemophilia treatment. Since 1972, 5 cross-sectional national postal surveys among all hemophilia patients in the Netherlands were performed, the latest in 2001. The prestructured questionnaires included items on treatment, the presence of inhibitory antibodies against factor VIII or IX, the annual number of bleeding episodes, use of inpatient hospital care, and hepatitis C and HIV infections. Response rate in 2001 was 70%. Young patients (<16 years) with severe hemophilia showed the largest increase in use of prophylaxis, from 34% in 1972 to 86% in 2001. The occurrence of hemorrhages has gradually decreased. Hospital admissions decreased from 47% of all patients in 1972 to 18% in 2001. Our study shows that the treatment of patients with severe hemophilia in the Netherlands has focused on the use of prophylactic treatment, especially in children. This has resulted in a decrease in bleeding frequency and an improvement of the medical and social circumstances of patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2004-05-2008DOI Listing
December 2004

Inhibition of fibrinolysis by recombinant factor VIIa in plasma from patients with severe hemophilia A.

Blood 2002 Jan;99(1):175-9

Thrombosis and Haemostasis Laboratory, Department of Haematology, Institute of Biomembranes, Van Creveldkliniek, University Medical Centre, Utrecht University, The Netherlands.

Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) is a novel prohemostatic drug for patients with hemophilia who have developed inhibitory antibodies. The postulation has been made that hemophilia is not only a disorder of coagulation, but that hyperfibrinolysis due to a defective activation of thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) might also play a role. In this in vitro study, the potential of rFVIIa to down-regulate fibrinolysis via activation of TAFI was investigated. rFVIIa was able to prolong clot lysis time in plasmas from 17 patients with severe hemophilia A. The prolongation of clot lysis time by rFVIIa was completely abolished by addition of an inhibitor of activated TAFI. The concentration of rFVIIa required for half maximal prolongation of clot lysis time (C(lys 1/2)-VIIa) varied widely between patients (median, 73.0 U/mL; range, 10.8-250 U/mL). The concentration of rFVIIa required for half maximal reduction of clotting time (C(clot 1/2)-VIIa) was approximately 10-fold lower than the C(lys 1/2)-VIIa value (median, 8.4 U/mL; range, 1.7-22.5 U/mL). Inhibition of TFPI with a polyclonal antibody significantly decreased C(lys 1/2)-VIIa values (median, 2.6 U/mL; range, 0-86.9 U/mL), whereas C(clot 1/2)-VIIa values did not change (median, 7.2 U/mL; range, 2.2-22.5 U/mL). On addition of 100 ng/mL recombinant full-length TFPI, a nonsignificant increase of C(lys 1/2)-VIIa values was observed (median, 119.2 U/mL; range, 12.3-375.0 U/mL), whereas C(clot 1/2)-VIIa values did not change (median, 8.8 U/mL; range, 2.6-34.6 U/mL). In conclusion, this study shows that rFVIIa both accelerates clot formation and inhibits fibrinolysis by activation of TAFI in factor VIII-deficient plasma. However, a large variability in antifibrinolytic potential of rFVIIa exists between patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood.v99.1.175DOI Listing
January 2002