Mr Evans Asamoah Adu - Department of Molecular Medicine  - Mr

Mr Evans Asamoah Adu

Department of Molecular Medicine

Mr

Kumasi, Ashanti | Ghana

Main Specialties: Cardiovascular Disease, Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism, Medical Genetics, Statistics

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-6374-0979

Mr Evans Asamoah Adu - Department of Molecular Medicine  - Mr

Mr Evans Asamoah Adu

Introduction

Primary Affiliation: Department of Molecular Medicine - Kumasi, Ashanti , Ghana

Specialties:

Education

Aug 2018
Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology
MPhil Chemical Pathology

Publications

6Publications

48Reads

125Profile Views

10PubMed Central Citations

Renal abnormalities among children with sickle cell conditions in highly resource-limited setting in Ghana.

PLoS One 2019 19;14(11):e0225310. Epub 2019 Nov 19.

Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0225310PLOS
November 2019
35 Reads
3.234 Impact Factor

Predictors of Noncompliance to Antihypertensive Therapy among Hypertensive Patients Ghana: Application of Health Belief Model.

Int J Hypertens 2018 19;2018:4701097. Epub 2018 Jun 19.

Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medical Science, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), Kumasi, Ghana.

This study determined noncompliance to antihypertensive therapy (AHT) and its associated factors in a Ghanaian population by using the health belief model (HBM). This descriptive cross-sectional study conducted at Kintampo Municipality in Ghana recruited a total of 678 hypertensive patients. The questionnaire constituted information regarding sociodemographics, a five-Likert type HBM questionnaire, and lifestyle-related factors. The rate of noncompliance to AHT in this study was 58.6%. The mean age (SD) of the participants was 43.5 (±5.2) years and median duration of hypertension was 2 years. Overall, the five HBM constructs explained 31.7% of the variance in noncompliance to AHT with a prediction accuracy of 77.5%, after adjusting for age, gender, and duration of condition. Higher levels of perceived benefits of using medicine [aOR=0.55(0.36-0.82),p=0.0001] and cue to actions [aOR=0.59(0.38-0.90),p=0.0008] were significantly associated with reduced noncompliance while perceived susceptibility [aOR=3.05(2.20-6.25), p<0.0001], perceived barrier [aOR=2.14(1.56-2.92), p<0.0001], and perceived severity [aOR=4.20(2.93-6.00),p<0.0001] were significantly associated with increased noncompliance to AHT. Participant who had completed tertiary education [aOR=0.27(0.17-0.43), p<0.0001] and had regular source of income [aOR=0.52(0.38-0.71), p<0.0001] were less likely to be noncompliant. However, being a government employee [aOR=4.16(1.93-8.96), p=0.0002)] was significantly associated increased noncompliance to AHT. Noncompliance to AHT was considerably high and HBM is generally reliable in assessing treatment noncompliance in the Ghanaian hypertensive patients. The significant predictors of noncompliance to AHT were higher level of perceived barriers, susceptibility, and severity. Intervention programmes could be guided by the association of risk factors, HBM constructs with noncompliance to AHT in clinical practice.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2018/4701097DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6029446PMC
June 2018
12 Reads
2 Citations

Association of Wrist Circumference and Waist-to-Height Ratio with Cardiometabolic Risk Factors among Type II Diabetics in a Ghanaian Population

Journal of Diabetes Research

The study determined the association of wrist circumference (WrC) and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) with cardiometabolic risk factors among diabetics in a Ghanaian population. This cross-sectional study involved 384 diabetic patients at Begoro District Hospital, Ghana. Blood pressure, anthropometrics, and biochemical indices were measured. The overall prevalence of dyslipidaemia, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and hypertension was 42.4%, 76.3%, and 39.8%, respectively. The optimum cut-off range of WrC to identify individuals at increased cardiometabolic risk was 17.5 to –17.8 cm for men and 16.0 to 16.7 cm for women while that of WHtR was 0.52 to 0.61 for men and 0.53 to 0.59 for women. WrC for women was a significant independent predictor for MetS [aOR = 3.0 (1.39–6.72), p=0.005] and systolic blood pressure [aOR = 2.08 (1.17–3.68), p=0.012]. WHtR was a significant positive predictor for triglycerides [aOR = 3.23 (0.10–3.82), p=0.001] for women. Using Framingham risk scores, 61% of the subjects had elevated 10-year risk of developing cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), with no significant difference in gender prevalence. WrC [aOR = 6.13 (0.34–111.4), p=0.107] and WHtR [aOR = 2.52 (0.42–15.02), p=0.309] were associated with statistically insignificant increased odds of moderate-to-high risk of developing CVDs in 10 years. The use of gender-specific cut-offs for WrC and WHtR may offer putative markers for early identification of CRFs.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2018/1838162

View Article
February 2018

5 Citations

Impact Factor 2.890

91 Reads

Top co-authors

Enoch Odame Anto
Enoch Odame Anto

Edith Cowan University

3
Christian Obirikorang
Christian Obirikorang

School of Medical Sciences

3
Peter Kojo Brenya
Peter Kojo Brenya

School of Medical Science

1
Beatrice Amoah
Beatrice Amoah

School of Medical Science

1
Adjei Gyimah Akwasi
Adjei Gyimah Akwasi

Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology

1