Publications by authors named "Eva Rychlikova"

4 Publications

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The risk assessment of inorganic and organic pollutant levels in an urban area affected by intensive industry.

Environ Monit Assess 2021 Jan 18;193(2):68. Epub 2021 Jan 18.

Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources, Czech University of Life Sciences in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.

The city of Litvínov (North Bohemia, Czech Republic) is seriously affected by coal mining, coal processing, and intensive industrial activities. Within the urban area, the potential environmental hazard of risk elements (in soil and vegetation) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, in soils) was estimated using selected environmental and human health hazard indices. In total, 24 sites were sampled, including the city center, residential areas, industrialized zone, and areas close to operating and/or abandoned coal mines. The results showed elevated values of As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in soils (the maximum levels of individual pollution indices varied between 3 and 5 for As, Pb, and Zn); the risk assessment code (RAC) values indicated high bioaccessibility of Cd and Zn. The high mobility of Cd was confirmed by their bioaccumulation factors (BAF) in the aboveground biomass of Taraxacum sect. Ruderalia and Polygonum aviculare, reaching up to 1.9 and 2.9, respectively. The Cd content in plants presents a substantial health hazard for herbivores such as Oryctolagus cuniculus living within the urban area. The PAH levels in the soils also showed elevated values; the contents of benzo(a)pyrene exceeded more than 2-fold the indicative values for potential health risk for biota, especially near the abandoned coal mines. The incremental lifetime cancer risks (ILCR) for ingestion of the contaminated soil showed only low or negligible cancerogenic risk, varying between 6.7 × 10 and 1.6 × 10 for children, and between 9.9 × 10 and 2.7 × 10 for adults. However, the potential health impact of the inhalation of the contaminated particulate matter should be included in the further research. Although the contamination level in the investigated area does not represent an imminent environmental and health risk, the potential remediation measures should be considered in the future.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10661-020-08825-xDOI Listing
January 2021

Bioaccessibility of As, Cu, Pb, and Zn in mine waste, urban soil, and road dust in the historical mining village of Kaňk, Czech Republic.

Environ Geochem Health 2018 Aug 15;40(4):1495-1512. Epub 2017 Jun 15.

Institute of Geology, Academy of Science of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Rozvojová 269, 165 00, Prague 6-Lysolaje, Czech Republic.

Historical mining activities in the village of Kaňk (in the northern part of the Kutná Hora ore district, Czech Republic) produced large amounts of mine wastes which contain significant amounts of metal(loid) contaminants such as As, Cu, Pb, and Zn. Given the proximity of residential communities to these mining residues, we investigated samples of mine waste (n = 5), urban soil (n = 6), and road dust (n = 5) with a special focus on the solid speciation of As, Cu, Pb, and Zn using a combination of methods (XRD, SEM/EDS, oxalate extractions), as well as on in vitro bioaccessibility in simulated gastric and lung fluids to assess the potential exposure risks for humans. Bulk chemical analyses indicated that As is the most important contaminant in the mine wastes (~1.15 wt%), urban soils (~2900 mg/kg) and road dusts (~440 mg/kg). Bioaccessible fractions of As were quite low (4-13%) in both the simulated gastric and lung fluids, while the bioaccessibility of metals ranged between <0.01% (Pb) and 68% (Zn). The bioaccessibilities of the metal(loid)s were dependent on the mineralogy and different adsorption properties of the metal(loid)s. Based on our results, a potential health risk, especially for children, was recognized from the ingestion of mine waste materials and highly contaminated urban soil. Based on the risk assessment, arsenic was found to be the element posing the greatest risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10653-017-9999-1DOI Listing
August 2018

Differences between the spectra of respiratory illnesses in children living in urban and rural environments.

Cent Eur J Public Health 2014 Mar;22(1):3-11

A longitudinal study launched in 1994 within the framework of the Teplice Programme aimed at comparing the respiratory morbidity in children born (1994-1998) and living in the districts of Teplice (TE) and Prachatice (PRA) in the Czech Republic. Lists of all illnesses of 960 children from birth to 10 years of age were obtained from paediatric medical records. From 26,471 diagnoses (in ICD-10 codes), 34.7% were diagnoses of upper respiratory infections (URI, J00-02, J06), 11.3% of tonsillitis, 10.2% of influenza, 9.4% of bronchitis, 8.9% of laryngitis/tracheitis (J04), 2.7% of otitis media, and 0.5% of pneumonia. The more polluted district of Teplice was divided into two parts: the town itself (TE-town) and the rest of the district (TE-district). The cumulative incidence rates of the above respiratory illnesses per 100 children per 10 years were 2,212 in TE-town, 2,192 in PRA and 1,985 in TE-district. In the first two years of life, the children from TE-town had a significantly higher incidence of laryngitis/tracheitis, influenza, otitis media, and pneumonia and significantly lower incidence of bronchitis and tonsillitis than children living in PRA. The incidence rates of laryngitis/tracheitis and influenza in TE-town persisted as the highest among the three regions till the age of 10 years. The incidence rates of bronchitis (from the 1st to 5th year) and URI (from 4th to 10th year) were highest in children living in PRA. When compared to TE-town, children in TE-district had a higher incidence of upper respiratory infections (1-8 years) and lower incidence of bronchitis (6-8 years). Children in the district of Prachatice had a significantly higher prevalence of allergic rhinitis and a lower prevalence of wheezing than children in the district of Teplice. Thus, the three regions differed by the spectra of respiratory illnesses rather than by overall morbidity and, hypothetically, the effects of air pollution were obscurred by differences in the degree of urbanization.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21101/cejph.a3950DOI Listing
March 2014

Comparison of child morbidity in regions of Ostrava, Czech Republic, with different degrees of pollution: a retrospective cohort study.

Environ Health 2013 Sep 3;12(1):74. Epub 2013 Sep 3.

Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR, Prague, Czech Republic.

Background: To confirm or refute the hypothesis that the morbidity of children (since birth to age 5) born and living in the heavily polluted (PM10, benzo[a]pyrene) eastern part of Ostrava, Czech Republic, was higher than the morbidity of children living in other parts of the city.

Methods: Ten pediatricians in 5 districts of Ostrava abstracted the medical records of 1878 children born in 2001-2004 to list all illnesses of each child in ICD-10 codes. The children were divided into four groups according to their residence at birth and thereafter. Most of the children in the eastern area were living in the city district Radvanice and Bartovice.

Results: We report on the incidence of acute illnesses in 1535 children of Czech ethnicity in the first 5 years of life. The most frequent acute illnesses (over 45% of all diagnoses) were upper respiratory infections (URI: J00-J02, J06). In the first year of life, the incidence of URI in 183 children in the eastern area - 372 illnesses/100 children/year - was more than twice as high as in the other 3 areas with a total number of 1352 children. From birth to the age of 5 years, the incidences of pneumonia, tonsillitis, viral infections (ICD-10 code B34) and intestinal infectious diseases were also several times higher in children living in the eastern part of Ostrava. The lowest morbidity was found in children living in the less polluted western part of the city.

Conclusions: The children born and living in the eastern part of the city of Ostrava had from birth through 5 years significantly higher incidence rates of acute illnesses than children in other parts of Ostrava. They also had a higher prevalence of wheezing, atopic dermatitis and allergic rhinitis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1476-069X-12-74DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3844449PMC
September 2013