Publications by authors named "Eunbee Park"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Bone Marrow Transplantation Procedures in Mice to Study Clonal Hematopoiesis.

J Vis Exp 2021 05 26(171). Epub 2021 May 26.

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Virginia School of Medicine; Hematovascular Biology Center, Robert M. Berne Cardiovascular Research Center, University of Virginia School of Medicine;

Clonal hematopoiesis is a prevalent age-associated condition that results from the accumulation of somatic mutations in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). Mutations in driver genes, that confer cellular fitness, can lead to the development of expanding HSPC clones that increasingly give rise to progeny leukocytes harboring the somatic mutation. Because clonal hematopoiesis has been associated with heart disease, stroke, and mortality, the development of experimental systems that model these processes is key to understanding the mechanisms that underly this new risk factor. Bone marrow transplantation procedures involving myeloablative conditioning in mice, such as total-body irradiation (TBI), are commonly employed to study the role of immune cells in cardiovascular diseases. However, simultaneous damage to the bone marrow niche and other sites of interest, such as the heart and brain, is unavoidable with these procedures. Thus, our lab has developed two alternative methods to minimize or avoid possible side effects caused by TBI: 1) bone marrow transplantation with irradiation shielding and 2) adoptive BMT to non-conditioned mice. In shielded organs, the local environment is preserved allowing for the analysis of clonal hematopoiesis while the function of resident immune cells is unperturbed. In contrast, the adoptive BMT to non-conditioned mice has the additional advantage that both the local environments of the organs and the hematopoietic niche are preserved. Here, we compare three different hematopoietic cell reconstitution approaches and discuss their strengths and limitations for studies of clonal hematopoiesis in cardiovascular disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3791/61875DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8439117PMC
May 2021

NFAT1 and JunB cooperatively regulate IL-31 gene expression in CD4+ T cells in health and disease.

J Immunol 2015 Feb 16;194(4):1963-74. Epub 2015 Jan 16.

Academy of Immunology and Microbiology, Institute for Basic Science, Pohang 790-784, Republic of Korea; Division of Integrative Biosciences and Biotechnology, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784, Republic of Korea; and

IL-31 is a key mediator of itching in atopic dermatitis (AD) and is preferentially produced by activated CD4(+) T cells and Th2 cells. Although pathophysiological functions of IL-31 have been suggested in diverse immune disorders, the molecular events underlying IL-31 gene regulation are still unclear. In this study we identified the transcription start site and functional promoter involved in IL-31 gene regulation in mouse CD4(+) T cells. TCR stimulation-dependent IL-31 expression was found to be closely linked with in vivo binding of NFAT1 and JunB to the IL-31 promoter. Although NFAT1 alone enhanced IL-31 promoter activity, it was further enhanced in the presence of JunB. Conversely, knockdown of either NFAT1 or JunB resulted in reduced IL-31 expression. NFAT1-deficient CD4(+) T cells showed a significant defect in IL-31 expression compared with wild-type CD4(+) T cells. In agreement with these findings, mice subjected to atopic conditions showed much higher levels of IL-31, which were closely correlated with a significant increase in the number of infiltrated NFAT1(+)CD4(+) T cells into the AD ears. Amelioration of AD progression by cyclosporin A treatment was well correlated with downregulation of IL-31 expressions in CD4(+) T cells and total ear residual cells. In summary, our results suggest a functional cooperation between NFAT1 and JunB in mediating IL-31 gene expression in CD4(+) T cells and indicate that interference with this interaction or their activity has the potential of reducing IL-31-mediated AD symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.1401862DOI Listing
February 2015

6-Methoxyflavone inhibits NFAT translocation into the nucleus and suppresses T cell activation.

J Immunol 2014 Sep 11;193(6):2772-83. Epub 2014 Aug 11.

Academy of Immunology and Microbiology, Institute for Basic Science, Pohang 790-784, Republic of Korea; Division of Integrative Biosciences and Biotechnology, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784, Republic of Korea

NFAT plays a crucial role in the immune system by regulating the transcription of inducible genes during immune responses. In T cells, NFAT proteins govern various cellular events related to T cell development, activation, tolerance induction, and differentiation. We previously reported the NFAT1-dependent enhancer activity of conserved noncoding sequence (CNS)-9, a distal cis-acting element, in the regulation of IL-10 transcription in T cells. In this study, we developed a T cell-based reporter system to identify compounds that modulate the regulatory activity of CNS-9. Among the identified candidates, 6-methoxyflavone (6-MF) significantly inhibited the enhancer activity of CNS-9, thereby reducing IL-10 expression in T cells without affecting cell viability. 6-MF also downregulated the transcription of NFAT1 target genes such as IL-4, IL-13, and IFN-γ. Treatment of 6-MF inhibited the translocation of NFAT1 into the nucleus, which consequently interrupted NFAT1 binding to the target loci, without affecting the expression or dephosphorylation of NFAT1. Treatment of 6-MF to CD4(+) T cells or B cells isolated from mice with atopic dermatitis significantly reduced disease-associated cytokine production, as well as the levels of IgE. In addition, oral administration of 6-MF to atopic dermatitis mice ameliorated disease symptoms by reducing serum IgE levels and infiltrating lymphocytes. Conclusively, our results suggest that 6-MF can be a potential candidate for the development of an effective immunomodulator via the suppression of NFAT-mediated T cell activation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.1400285DOI Listing
September 2014
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